Past, Present and Future Water Supply Planning and Present and Future Water... · Past, Present and…

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  • Past, Present and Future Water Supply Planning and Needs

    By Bill HagenBurger, P.E.Plant Engineer

  • Presentation Outline

    Creation of Beaver Lake

    Formation of Beaver Water District

    Evolution of Beaver Water District

    Beaver Water District Now

    Future Transmission Line Plans

    Future Water Demand Projections

  • Whats Happening in NWA Circa 1950

    1950 Sam Walton purchased a store in Bentonville and opened Waltons 5 & 10

    1952 Don Tyson Graduates From the University of Arkansas

    Late 1950s Meatpackers begin to base operations in NWA

    1958 Tysons Randall Road Plant Opens Joe Steele looking to expand his canning company

  • Lets Look at Historical Population Growth

    0

    10,000

    20,000

    30,000

    40,000

    50,000

    60,000

    70,000

    80,000

    90,000

    100,000

    1830 1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970

    Po

    pu

    lati

    on

    Year

    Washington & Benton County Populations 1840 to 1960

    Washington County

    Benton County

  • Whats Holding Us Back?

    By the 1950s, the springs that had always watered the area could not produce enough water to supply the areas growth Quote about Springdale from the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture

  • NWA Water Sources

    Water Supply Sources

    Fayetteville: West Fork/Clear Creek/Lake Fayetteville/Lake Sequoyah

    Springdale: Spring Creek Springs/Shiloh Springs/Fulbright Springs/Little Osage Creek

    Rogers: Frisco Spring/Diamond Spring/Deep well/Lake Atalanta

    Bentonville: Unnamed spring/Ford Spring

  • What are we going to do DAM IT! 1927: Flooding results in

    almost 100 deaths and 1 million in damages

    1929: COE begins study of White River basin

    1938: FDR signs Flood Control Act

    Flood Control Act authorized civil engineering projects such as dams, levees, dikes, and other flood control measures through the United States Army Corps of Engineers

  • The Birth of Beaver Lake

    1940s a group of NWA businessman push for the construction of a dam near Eureka Springs

    Beaver Dam Association Formed after WWII

    1954: Congress adds Beaver Reservoir to the Flood Control Act for the purpose of:

    Flood Control

    Power Generation

  • Ok we are all set BUT HOLD ON!

    COE performs Cost Benefit analysis based on Flood Control Power generation

    Cost GREATER Than Benefits 1958 Congress passes the Water Supply Act Water Supply Act allows COE to include Municipal

    Water Supply in Cost Benefit analysis Benefits GREATER Than Cost CAVEAT

  • The Birth of Beaver Water District Federal Water Supply Act requires a local sponsor to

    pay for the water supply portion of the lake Arkansas Legislature passes Act 114 of 1957

    Creating Regional Water Distribution Districts

    August 27, 1959 Beaver Water District is Born! Includes Benton & Washington Counties Sells water to cities of Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers &

    Bentonville Governed by a Six member publicly elected Board of

    Directors

  • Beaver Dam

    1960 Construction Begins By 1966 Dam is

    complete and Beaver lake is filling with Water

  • Beaver Water District South Intake

    Constructed before the lake was filled

    Capacity of 80 MGD

    BWDs only intake till 2006

  • Beaver Water District Treatment Plant

    Completed 1966

    Capacity of 10 MGD

    Serves City of Springdale only

  • Beaver Water District Treatment Plant

    Newspaper article about the new WTP going onlineThe following article, by NEWS staff writer

    Mike Snipes, describes the complicated and expensive procedures required to provide Northwest Arkansas with its biggest asset the key to industrial and

    agricultural development pure water.

  • Treatment Plant 1978

    Capacity of 50 MGD

    1971 Rogers & Bentonville start receiving water

    1972 Fayetteville starts to receive water

    Joe M. Steele WTP

  • Treatment Plant 1993

    Total Capacity of 80 MGD

    Hardy Croxton WTP added 40 MGD

  • North Intake

    Pumping Capacity of 70 MGD

    Online 2006

    Hydraulic Capacity of 140 MGD

    BWD Intakes Total Capacity of 220 MGD

  • Treatment Plant Today

    Solids Handling Facility Capacity of 140 MGD

    Renovated Joe M. Steele WTP

    Six Mega Watts of Emergency Power

    Administration Center with Visitors Center and Education Center

  • Lets Look at Historical Population Growth Again

    010,00020,00030,00040,00050,00060,00070,00080,00090,000

    100,000110,000120,000130,000140,000150,000160,000170,000180,000190,000200,000210,000220,000230,000240,000

    1830 1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020

    Po

    pu

    lati

    on

    Year

    Washington & Benton County Populations 1840 to 2010

    Washington County

    Benton County

  • Beaver Water Districts Future

    Western Corridor pipeline project Construction for additional Emergency Power Continue to be proactive about drinking water

    regulations Be involved with local and national drinking

    water associations

    Continue with our Watershed Protection Program

  • Regional Growth Study

    Completed in January 2006

    Develop population forecasts and water demand projections through 2055

    Investigate the need for a new transmission line to serve existing & future customers

  • Population Density

    0 2 4 6 Mi les

    2010 Pop Density0 - 5050 - 100100 - 200200 - 300300 - 500500 - 700700 - 10001000 - 15001500 - 20002000 - 25002500 - 35003500 - 45004500 - 65006500 - 1050010500+

    N

    2010 Benton and Washington County Population Density(per square mile)

    20100 2 4 6 Mi les

    2055 Pop Density0 - 5050 - 100100 - 200200 - 300300 - 500500 - 700700 - 10001000 - 15001500 - 20002000 - 25002500 - 35003500 - 45004500 - 65006500 - 1050010500+

    N

    2055 Benton and Washington County Population Density(per square mile)

    2055

    Benton & Washington County Population Density (per square mile)

  • 0 2 4 6 Mi les

    Water Demands0.00 - 0.010.01 - 0.020.02 - 0.040.04 - 0.060.06 - 0.100.10 - 0.200.20 - 0.300.30 - 0.500.50 - 0.750.75 - 1.001.00 - 1.501.50 - 2.002.00 - 3.003.00 - 4.004+

    N

    Benton and Washington County 2055 Maximum Day Water Demands (MGD per square mile)

    0 2 4 6 Mi les

    Water Demands0.00 - 0.010.01 - 0.020.02 - 0.040.04 - 0.060.06 - 0.100.10 - 0.200.20 - 0.300.30 - 0.500.50 - 0.750.75 - 1.001.00 - 1.501.50 - 2.002.00 - 3.003.00 - 4.004+

    N

    Benton and Washington County 2010 Maximum Day Water Demands (MGD per square mile)

    Water Demand Density

    2010 2055

    Benton & Washington County Water Demands (MGD per square mile)

  • Key Findings

    Growth will create water demands that will exceed BWDs deliverable capacity

    Development Could Box-in BWD

    Rapid growth (residential congestion)

    Future water demands will occur West of current service area

    Increasing easement costs

  • Western Corridor Pipeline Project Currently obtaining easements

    for two future 60 dia. pipelines

    Cross I-49 then parallel future 412 Bypass to east of Hwy. 112

    Construct Pump Station near Willis Shaw Elementary School

    Customer Cities Future Pipelines will go the new PS

  • 2015 Master Plan

    Population Projections

    Water Demand Projections

    Regulatory Review

    Capital Improvement Program

    Facility Review and Evaluation

  • Population Projections - NWARPCTable 2-1. Service Area Historic Population

    City/Regional Area 19801 1990 2000 2010

    Bentonville 8,756 11,257 19,730 35,301

    Bella Vista (85%)2 2,201 7,721 14,095 22,492

    Cave Springs 429 465 1,103 1,729

    Bentonville Regional Subtotal 11,386 19,443 34,928 59,522

    Rogers 17,429 24,682 38,829 55,964

    Lowell (5%)2 54 61 251 366

    Rogers Regional Subtotal 17,483 24,743 39,080 56,330

    Springdale 23,458 29,945 45,798 69,797

    Lowell (95%)2 1,024 1,163 4,762 6,961

    Bethel Heights 296 281 714 2,372

    Elm Springs 781 898 1,044 1,532

    Tontitown 615 450 942 2,460

    Johnson (50%)2 260 300 1,160 1,677

    Springdale Regional Subtotal 26,434 33,036 54,420 84,799

    Fayetteville 36,608 42,247 58,047 73,580

    Johnson (50%)2 260 300 1,160 1,677

    Farmington 1,283 1,322 3,605 5,974

    West Fork 1,526 1,628 2,042 2,317

    Greenland 622 757 907 1,259

    Elkins 579 692 1,251 2,648

    Goshen - 589 752 1,071

    Fayetteville Regional Subtotal 40,878 47,535 67,764 88,526

    Total Four Primary Cities 86,251 108,131 162,404 234,642

    Total Service Area 96,180 124,757 196,191 289,177

    1. All data sourced from available U.S. Census Bureau. 2. Number in parentheses represents percentage of the wholesale

    customer serviced by the primary customer city.

    Table 2-2. Service Area Population Projections

    City/Regional Area 20201 2030 2040 Growth %

    Bentonville 47,323 59,345 71,367 3.4%

    Bella Vista (85%)2 29,878 37,263 44,649 3.3%

    Cave Springs 2,361 2,993 3,625 3.7%

    Bentonville Regional Subtotal 79,562 99,601 119,641 3.4%

    Rogers 71,600 87,236 102,872 2.8%

    Lowell (5%)2 519 672 824 4.2%

    Rogers Regional Subtotal 72,119 87,908 103,696 2.8%

    Springdale 89,725 109,653 129,581 2.9%

    Lowell (95%)2 9,860 12,759 15,658 4.2%

    Bethel Heights 3,418 4,463 5,509 4.4%

    Elm Springs 1,856 2,177 2,499 2.1%

    Tontitown 3,460 4,460 5,460 4.1%

    Johnson (50%)2 2,366 3,055 3,743 4.1%

    Springdale Regional Subtotal 110,685 136,566 162,450 3.1%

    Fayetteville 89,321 105,061 120,801 2.1%

    Johnson (50%)2 2,366 3,055 3,743 4.1%

    Farmington 8,300 10,626 12,952 3.9%

    West Fork 2,672 3,027 3,383 1.5%

    Greenland 1,510 1,761 2,013 2.0%

    Elkins 3,626 4,604 5,582 3.7%

    Goshen 1,312 1,553 1,795 2.3%

    Fayetteville Regional Subtotal 109,107 129,687 150,268 2.3%

    Total Four Primary Cities 297,969 361,295 424,621 2.7%

    Total Service Area 371,473 453,761 536,056 2.8%

    1. All data sourced from available U.S. Census Bureau. 2. Number in parentheses represents percentage of the wholesale customer serviced by the primary customer city.

  • Population Projections - NWARPC

  • City Per Capita Demands

  • City Per Capita Demands

  • Water Demand Projections

    Table 2-14. Average Day Projections

    Year Average Day (mgd)

    Bentonville Rogers Springdale Fayetteville BWD Sales BWD Production

    2015 8.93 9.32 16.06 14.79 49.10 50.57

    2020 10.22 10.47 18.18 16.33 55.19 56.85

    2025 11.51 11.61 20.31 17.87 61.29 63.13

    2030 12.79 12.76 22.44 19.41 67.39 69.41

    2035 14.08 13.90 24.56 20.94 73.49 75.69

    2040 15.37 15.05 26.69 22.48 79.59 81.98

    Table 2-17. Max Day Projections

    Year Max Day Capacity (mgd)

    Bentonville Rogers Springdale Fayetteville BWD Sales BWD Production

    2015 16.98 19.09 29.92 30.02 96.01 98.89

    2020 19.43 21.43 33.88 33.15 107.89 111.13

    2025 21.88 23.78 37.84 36.28 119.78 123.37

    2030 24.33 26.13 41.80 39.40 131.66 135.61

    2035 26.77 28.47 45.76 42.53 143.54 147.85

    2040 29.22 30.82 49.72 45.66 155.42 160.09

  • Water Demand Projections

  • Closing Thoughts

    Beaver Lake is needed to meet the future drinking water demands of the region

    Beaver Lake has been a tremendous investment for the region

    Beaver Lake is a very important asset for the region and it needs to be treated as such

  • Questions?

    ????????

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