OpenTV Home Networking White Paper

  • Published on
    20-May-2015

  • View
    1.375

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • 1. White PaperOpenTV IPTV Solutions September 2005OpenTV, Inc. 275 Sacramento StreetSan Francisco, CA 94111 This document contains information that is proprietary to OpenTV, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction or disclosure of this information in whole or in part is prohibited.

2. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaper Copyright and reproduction noticeCopyright 2005 by OpenTV, Inc. All rights reserved. No part or contents of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted inany form or by any means without the written permission of OpenTV, Inc., located at 275 Sacramento Street, San Francisco,California 94111-3810, U.S.A. PatentsOpenTVs software and services are protected by and/or access, perform, or enable methods and systems protected by one or morepatents and/or patent applications in the U.S. and other countries. TrademarksOpenTV, the OpenTV logo, OpenTV Core middleware, and OpenTV PVR 2.0 are service marks, trademarks, or registeredtrademarks of OpenTV, Inc. in the United States of America and other countries. This is not an exhaustive list.Sun, Sun Microsystems, the Sun Logo, Solaris, Java, and the Java logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems,Inc. in the United States and other countries. Adobe, Acrobat, PostScript and Display Postscript are trademarks or registeredtrademarks of Adobe Systems, Inc. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Warranty disclaimerTHIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED AS IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUTNOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT.THIS PUBLICATION COULD INCLUDE TECHNICAL INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLYADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN; THESE CHANGES MAY BE INCORPORATED IN NEW EDITIONS OF THE PUBLICATION.OPENTV AND/OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES IN THE PRODUCT(S) AND/OR THEPROGRAM(S) DESCRIBED IN THIS PUBLICATION AT ANY TIME. Copyright 2005 OpenTV, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2 of 21 3. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaperTable of Contents 1.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................................................... 42.IPTV OVERVIEW .............................................................................................................................................. 52.1 WHAT IS IPTV?........................................................................................................................................... 52.2 IPTV MARKET TRENDS................................................................................................................................ 52.3 FIRST GENERATION IPTV ............................................................................................................................ 62.4 NEXT GENERATION IPTV............................................................................................................................. 7 3.THE VALUE OF MIDDLEWARE ...................................................................................................................... 94.OPENTV IPTV MIDDLEWARE ....................................................................................................................... 104.1 OPENTV DIGITAL TV SOLUTIONS ............................................................................................................... 104.2 OPENTV CORE MIDDLEWARE .................................................................................................................... 114.3 OPENTV CORE FOR IPTV ......................................................................................................................... 134.4 OPENTV ENTERPRISE PRODUCTS FOR IPTV.............................................................................................. 14 5.OPENTV IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR CABLE OPERATORS............................................................................. 165.1 TRADITIONAL QAM CABLE DEPLOYMENTS WITH OPENTV ........................................................................... 165.2 OPENTV HYBRID IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR CABLE OPERATORS ...................................................................... 165.3 WHY CONSIDER IPTV? ............................................................................................................................. 17 6.OPENTV IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR SATELLITE OPERATORS...................................................................... 186.1 TRADITIONAL QPSK SATELLITE DEPLOYMENTS WITH OPENTV.................................................................... 186.2 OPENTV HYBRID IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR SATELLITE OPERATORS................................................................. 186.3 WHY CONSIDER IPTV? ............................................................................................................................. 18 7.OPENTV IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR TELECOM OPERATORS........................................................................ 197.1 TRADITIONAL TELCO TV (IPTV) DEPLOYMENTS WITH OPENTV ................................................................... 197.2 OPENTV HYBRID IPTV SOLUTIONS FOR TELECOM OPERATORS .................................................................. 207.3 WHY CONSIDER IPTV? ............................................................................................................................. 20 8.SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................................................... 21 Copyright 2005 OpenTV, Inc. All Rights Reserved.3 of 21 4. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaper 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) is a fast growing digital TV delivery technology that enables cable, satellite and telecommunication providers to launch PayTV services either on their own or in partnership with other operators to create hybrid IPTV solutions. Factors driving the increased interest in IPTV solutions include telecommunication companies facing increased competition, from both other Telcos and from digital cable operators who are offering triple-play services of voice, video and data. Cable companies are exploring the opportunity to partner with Telcos or even lease lines from Telcos allowing them to expand their services beyond the reach of their existing cable infrastructure. Satellite operators are also exploring relationships with Telcos to leverage high speed DSL services to enable two-way services for their consumers. All of these initiatives are driving these companies to adopt technology that is suited for the delivery of television, voice, and data over their existing infrastructure or hybrid models in offering the most compelling service bundle to their consumers. OpenTV has developed a standards-based IPTV solution that implements IPTV using a mature, proven, embedded STB middleware platform used today by most of the leading suppliers of STB technology. Our solution empowers cable, satellite and telcos to deliver stand-alone and hybrid IPTV solutions that best fit their business needs. Copyright 2005 OpenTV, Inc. All Rights Reserved.4 of 21 5. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaper 2. IPTV OVERVIEW2.1What is IPTV? It is important to first define what is meant by IPTV and how it differs from to traditional video streaming over the Internet. IPTV is the delivery of traditional PayTV services, including broadcast television, pay- per-view, VOD, PVR, interactive TV and applications over a closed, two-way broadband IP network to an IP enabled set-top box. With IPTV, the network operator (cable, satellite, telco or DTT) controls the user experience, the programming and applications delivered, and the quality of service (QOS) of the broadband IP pipe to the subscriber, whether xDSL or cable modem. IPTV includes support for both standard and high definition television (HDTV) and is not necessarily tied to any particular video format (e.g. MPEG-2 or MPEG-4). What IPTV is not, is about allowing any content provider to stream live, full-screen broadcast video over the Internet directly to subscribers without network operator control since no end-to-end QOS can be guaranteed. IPTV does not preclude these services, or services such downloadable movies by third-parties over the Internet (e.g. MovieLink) but the expectation from consumers when subscribing to IPTV is a digital television service that is as reliable or more reliable than todays cable, satellite or DTT services. 2.2IPTV Market Trends In recent years the interest in IPTV delivery of traditional PayTV services has grown significantly not only from telecommunications operators wishing to enter the PayTV market, but from cable and satellite operators who can also benefit from the cost savings of IPTV delivery and the advantages of moving from a broadcast to a two-way broadband delivery of digital television services. This new interest is driven by a number of market forces currently in effect. The Growth of Broadband Worldwide The availability of two-way broadband, both cable and xDSL, has exploded in recent years driven primarily by consumer demand for fast Internet access to support not only more feature rich web content, but services such as media streaming for music and video (e.g. Rhapsody and MovieLink), on-line gaming for game consoles and PCs (e.g. xBox Live! and GameSpy), new communication applications that support VOIP (e.g. Yahoo! Messenger and Skype), and personal media sharing and publishing services such as photo sharing and video blogging services (e.g. Snapfish). This increased deployment of broadband services creates economies of scale for delivering IPTV to consumers as part of a triple-play of voice, video and data.Moores Law and Reduced Equipment Costs Moores Law has driven down the cost of all equipment required by an operator to deliver PayTV services over two-way broadband IP networks, from video encoding hardware to core and access network equipment to customer premises equipment (set-tops) needed to decode and deliver protected digital television experiences to consumers. Interchangeable, standards-based hardware and software has given operators to pick and choose vendors from which to deliver IPTV services. The reduced cost allows operators to deploy access network equipment such as DSLAMs closer to the home. In many regions, telcos are deploying fiber to the curb, while builders of apartment complexes are increasingly wiring their buildings with Ethernet in addition to twisted pair or coax. This trend is especially evident in new construction of single and multi-unit dwellings. In addition, new wireless transmission schemes such as WiMax will offer alternative access to the home at very high bit rates.Copyright 2005 OpenTV, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5 of 21 6. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaperThe Growth of the Home Network and Connected Devices In addition to the continuing decline in cost for set-top boxes, cheaper PCs, home networking equipment such as WIFI routers and consumer electronic devices such as digital cameras and portable media players has led to an increased demand from consumers to connect these devices so that media is accessible on- demand and on devices and times that are most convenient to the user. This growth when combined with IPTV helps build the backbone needed by operators to deliver PayTV and other triple play services to consumers. The Reemergence of the Triple-Play Competitive pressure among cable, satellite and telecom operators when combined with lower equipment costs and home networking is bringing new importance to the bundling of voice, video and data services in a way that is relevant to subscribers. Network operators need to deliver these bundled services with a common infrastructure (i.e. OSS/BSS) and a common user experience in order to maximize revenue and maintain customer loyalty. Improvements in Bandwidth Efficiency with Next Generation Media Formats The advancements in broadband penetration and declining equipment costs have been further enhanced by improvements in media compression from traditional MPEG-2 to newer, more bandwidth efficient formats including AVC (aka MPEG4-10, H.264) and VC1 (aka VC9, WM9) formats. These new compression techniques can offer operators up to a 3 to 1 compression advantage over MPEG-2, allowing content to be delivered to consumers more cost effectively. Hardware solutions that support real-time MPEG4 encoding are already available from companies such as TANDBERG Television and Harmonic, as well as set-top boxes that support hardware decoding of these new media formats, creating the economic conditions necessary for IPTV delivery of both standard and high-definition TV programming. Regulatory Changes Force Broadband Competition Regulation has also played an important role in building an economic base for the IPTV markets. In many markets, regulators have forced ILECs to un-bundle the local loop and have regulated access to the cabinets in the local exchange as well as control over leased lines. These policies have allowed third parties to compete with ILECs in offering price competitive broadband access services. 2.3First Generation IPTV First generation IPTV deployments consisted of telcos deploying terminal-style set-top boxes running web browsers, where all applications subscribers interacted with, such as the program guide, VOD portals, and channel changing resided in centralized servers. Broadcast programming was delivered as either unicast or multicast streams to set-top boxes and VOD and EPG data is delivered using proprietary formats. When the user decides to switch channels for example, the STB sends a proprietary command encapsulated in HTTP to the server farm, which triggers routing of the appropriate multicast through the access network to the appropriate home. The IPTV client establishes the descrambling / decoding session in the STB through proprietary extensions to the HTML / JavaScript DOM. A similar scenario applies for VOD sessions, which are initiated by the IPTV client through proprietary commands to the server farm. While this server-based solution offers some benefits to operators, including a familiar model used to deploy broadband services on a large scale to PCs and simplified network architecture, it also presents a number of drawbacks, including Copyright 2005 OpenTV, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6 of 21 7. OpenTV Home Networking White Paper WhitePaper Poor User Experience The reliance of HTML and a round-trip communication significantly slows the user experience for applications that are user interaction intensive, such as the EPG, not allowing operators to deliver PayTV services that are competitive with todays cable and sate...

Recommended

View more >