Nutrition Workshop Proceedings 2011

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  • Dairy CattleNutrition WorkshopContinuing education for feed industry professionals and nutritional consultants

    2011 PROCEEDINGS

    November 8-10, 2011Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA

    Presented by the Penn State Extension Dairy Team

  • 2011 Dairy Cattle Nutrition Workshop

    Agenda

    November 8, 2011

    12:00 1:00 Registration

    1:00 5:00 Feed Management Certifi cation Workshop

    7:00 9:00 Everything You Need to Know about Farm Ammonia Emissions (RSVP required)

    November 9, 2011

    7:00 8:15 Registration

    Balchem Corporation Preconference Symposium

    8:00 8:25 Coff ee and Danish

    8:25 8:30 Introduction

    8:30 9:10 Environmental Impact of Feeding Cows from a Nitrogen Effi ciency Perspective, Dr. Gert van Duinkerken, Wageningen UR Livestock Research, the Netherlands

    9:10 9:50 Practical Nutrition: Amino Acid Supply in Diets Containing Corn Silage and Byproducts, Dr. Paul Kononoff , University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    9:50 10:20 Break

    10:20 11:00 Lysine in Dairy Cows: From Digestion to Milk Protein, Dr. Hlne Lapierre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

    11:00 11:20 Precision Release Nutrition - What You Need to Know, Dr. Ryan Ordway, Balchem Corporation

    11:20 12:00 Measuring Feed Effi ciency on the Back of a Napkin, Dr. Robert Fry, Atlantic Dairy Management Services

    12:00 12:15 Questions and Wrap Up

    12:15 2:00 Lunch

    12:15 1:30 ARPAS Northeast Chapter annual meeting

    12:00 8:00 Exhibit hall open

    2:00 3:15 Afternoon workshop - session 1

    3:15 3:30 Break Sponsored by Balchem Corporation

    3:30 4:45 Afternoon workshop - session 2

    5:00 ARPAS Exam off ered

    5:00 7:00 Reception in exhibit area Sponsored by Alltech Inc.

    7:15 9:30 Evening Session and Dinner Sponsored by Alltech Inc. (RSVP required)

    Moldy Silage Syndrome and Climate Eff ects on Crops, Nick Adams, Alltech

    YouTube-proofi ng Agriculture: Lessons Learned from H$U$ and Social Media AGvocacy, Mr. Andy Vance, Agricultural Journalist and Commentator

  • Mark your calendars!Future Dates for the Penn State Dairy Cattle Nutrition Workshop

    November 13 - 14, 2012 November 12 - 13, 2013

    Grantville, PA

    November 10, 2011

    6:30 7:45 Breakfast (RSVP required)Sponsored by Lallemand Animal Nutrition

    Ketosis in Dairy Herds: Clostridial Silages and Other Factors, Dr. Gary Oetzel, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    6:45 7:45 RegistrationCoff ee and Danish

    7:00 - 3:00 Exhibit hall open

    8:00 8:45 Managing the Rumen Environment to Control Milk Fat Depression, Dr. Tom Jenkins, Clemson University

    8:45 9:30 Whats Happening in Nutrient Management in the Chesapeake Bay?, Dr. Doug Beegle, Penn State

    9:30 10:15 Starch Digestibility in Ruminants, Dr. Bill Mahanna, Pioneer Hi-Bred, A DuPont Business

    10:15 10:45 Break

    10:45 11:45 Morning workshop - session 1

    11:45 12:00 Break

    12:00 - 1:00 Morning workshop - session 2

    1:00 2:00 Lunch, Sponsored in part by Novus International

    2:00 3:00 Afternoon workshop session

    2:00 ARPAS Exam off ered

    Coff ee service and breaks sponsored by Prince Agri-Products, Varied Industries Corporation, and Virtus Nutrition

    Post-conference Seminar Sponsored by Novus International Inc. (RSVP required)

    3:15 5:30 Removing Limitations on Cow Performance through Improved Cow Comfort

    Welcome, Dr. Robin Rastani, Novus

    The Novus C.O.W.S. Benchmark and Assessment Program: An Introduction, Mr. Ed Galo, Novus

    Removing Limitations on Cow Performance through Behavior, Management, and Housing Design, Dr. Cassandra Tucker, University of California, Davis

    Novus C.O.W.S. Implementation and Key Learnings, Ms. Kiyomi Ito, Novus

    Wrap-up, Mrs. Suzy Demeester, Novus

  • 2011 Dairy Cattle Nutrition Workshop

    Contents of Proceedings

    Improving Nitrogen Effi ciency of Dairy Cows and Its Environmental Impact G. van Duinkerken, A. Bannink, C. J. A. M. de Koning, J. Dijkstra, L. B. J. ebek, J. W. Spek, and A. M. van Vuuren, Wageningen University, the Netherlands ...................................................................... page 1

    Practical Nutrition: Amino Acid Supply in Diets Containing Corn Silage and Byproducts P. J. Kononoff and H. Paz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln ..................................................................................page 15

    Lysine in Dairy Cows: From Digestion to Milk Protein H. Lapierre and D. R. Ouellet, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; L. Doepel, University of Calgary; and G. E. Lobley, University of Aberdeen .................................................................................................................page 19

    Precision Release Nutrition What You Need to Know Ryan Ordway, Balchem Corporation ..........................................................................................................................page 27

    Measuring Feed Effi ciency: Why and How on the Back of a Napkin Robert C. Fry, Atlantic Dairy Management Services .............................................................................................page 29

    Managing the Rumen Environment to Control Milk Fat Depression T. C. Jenkins, Clemson University ................................................................................................................................page 31

    Whats Happening in Nutrient Management in the Chesapeake Bay? Douglas B. Beegle, Penn State ......................................................................................................................................page 39

    Starch Digestibility in Corn Grain and Silage Bill Mahanna, Pioneer Hi-Bred, A DuPont Business ..............................................................................................page 49

    Byproduct Feeds and Milk Fat Depression H. A. Ramirez-Ramirez and P. J. Kononoff , University of Nebraska-Lincoln ..................................................page 75

    TMR AuditsTM Improve TMR Consistency Tom Oelberg, Diamond V ...............................................................................................................................................page 81

    Meeting Calves Needs: Winter Feeding and Amino Acids Mark Hill, Gale Bateman, Jim Aldrich, and Rick Schlotterbeck, Nurture Research Center ......................page 87

    Energy and Protein Nutrition for Transition Cows Ric R. Grummer and Ryan Ordway, Balchem Corporation .................................................................................page 93

    Current Concepts in Time Budgeting for Dairy Cattle Rick Grant, Miner Institute .......................................................................................................................................... page 101

    Novus C.O.W.S. Program: On-farm Assessments to Improve Cow Comfort K. Ito, Novus International .......................................................................................................................................... page 113

    Exhibitor Directory .................................................................................................................................................................... page 119

  • 2011 Penn State Dairy Cattle Nutrition Workshop 1

    Improving Nitrogen Effi ciency of Dairy Cows and Its Environmental Impact

    G. van Duinkerken1*, A. Bannink1, C. J. A. M. de Koning1, J. Dijkstra2, L. B. J. ebek1, J. W. Spek1,2 and A. M. van Vuuren1

    1Wageningen UR Livestock Research, Edelhertweg 15, 8219 PH Lelystad, The Netherlands2Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University, Marijkeweg 40, 6709 PG Wageningen, The Netherlands

    *Email: gert.vanduinkerken@wur.nl

    SUMMARYIn lacta ng dairy ca le, the nitrogen use e ciency may vary between 16 to 36%. Advances in dairy cow nutri on and innova ons in management tools enable a substan- al increase in the nitrogen use e ciency of dairy ca le. In many countries, laws and regula ons on environmen-tal protec on challenge the dairy produc on chain to increase the nitrogen e ciency on farm level. Prac cal opportuni es and restraints in this area are discussed and improvement in nitrogen use e ciency of dairy ca le is put into the perspec ve of other environmental sustain-ability objec ves, animal health and farm economics.

    INTRODUCTIONNitrogen use e ciency (NUE) at whole-farm level var-ies between 8% and 64% and declines as stocking rates increase (Powell et al., 2010). The NUE at animal level is the ra o between nitrogen (N) in milk and N intake. The maximum NUE of lacta ng dairy cows (producing 25 kg milk/day) is 43% (van Vuuren and Meijs, 1987). Howev-er, this is a theore cal maximum, based on assump ons for inevitable nitrogen (N) losses for maintenance and milk produc on. Van Vuuren and Meijs (1987) assumed that for maintenance these losses accumulate to 67 g N/day including N in skin and hair, endogenous urinary N, and endogenous fecal N. Furthermore, there is a minimum loss of 4.1 g N/day inherent to the produc- on of 1 kg milk, including ine ciencies in amino acid u liza on in the intermediary metabolism, inevitable losses due to addi onal ruminal synthesis of microbial nucleic acids and addi onal endogenous fecal N losses (van Vuuren and Meijs, 1987).

    Achieving this theore cal maximum NUE of lacta ng dairy cows is not feasible in prac ce due to subop mal N diges bility of diets (van Vuuren and Meijs, 1987) and subop mal amino acid composi on of ileal digested protein (Misciatelli et al., 2003; No sger and St. Pierre, 2003; van Vuuren and Meijs, 1987). Various studies on NUE of dairy ca le in prac ce indicate that, in de-

    veloped areas, the common range of NUE in