of 20/20
office: 604.796.4300 | classifieds: 604.796.4300 | newsline: 604.796.4302 The Observer THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010 Agassiz Y Harrison $1 NEWS SERIES Part Two: A look at run-of-river technology at Harrison Lake See Page 5 Agassiz man saved by concerned co-workers Jessica Peters THE OBSERVER A group of concerned co-workers likely saved an Agassiz man from carbon monoxide poisoning on Sunday morning. When the man didn't arrive for work that day, his co-workers found that out of character, and decided to go check up on him at his Morrow Road home. They found him in bed, alive but unable to get up. They quickly called 911, and Agassiz ÀreÀghters arrived on scene, Chief Wayne Dyer said. "The place was full of carbon monoxide," he said. "If it wasn't for the co-workers showing up to see why he didn't show up, he would have perished." FireÀghters carry around C02 monitors, and the alarm went off immediately when they entered the man's home. The man did not have a C02 monitor, which would have gone off and alerted him to the gases that were building up in his home. Dyer says the build up was the result of "issues with his gas furnace, and the hot water tank." He stresses that anyone who has a gas appliance in their home should deÀnitely have a carbon monoxide monitor. The gas is virtually undetectable, and can cause death with long exposure. Even low exposures to carbon monoxide can cause symptoms, such as nausea, headaches and dizziness. Dyer says the man will now be susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning even in small doses. He was taken to Chilliwack Hospital, and then to Vancouver for treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. "This was the result of a blocked chimney," Dyer says. "People need to pay attention to their gas appliances. If you have any gas appliances, you need to have a monitor." Other incidents the Agassiz Fire Department responded to in the last few weeks include a debris Àre on McRae Road (Nov. 2), lines down on Pioneer and Heath (Nov. 3), a tree Àre on the Lougheed Hwy. (Nov. 4) and a call to some burn piles on Mt. Woodside (Nov. 5). On November 7, a young woman was kicked off a horse on Cemetery Road, and landed on her back. There were no serious injuries in that incident, and she was treated by B.C. Ambulance paramedics. An ATV was in a motor vehicle incident on Tuyttens Road on November 13, requiring an emergency call out. And while there was the smell of smoke in a building on Hwy. 9, on Nov. 8, there was no Àre. Also that day, they responded to a call about a broken gas line on Birch Road. There were false commercial alarms on Elm Road (Nov. 12) and Tower Road (Nov. 6). [email protected] Cadet Jessica Sparks stands at attention while Reverend Mary Duncan lays a wreath at the cenotaph in Vimy Park in Agassiz on Remembrance Day. For more photos, see pages 2 and 3. Honouring the fallen INSIDE THE OBSERVER news . . . . . . . . . . 2 opinion . . . . . . . . 6 mailbag. . . . . . . . 7 sports . . . . . . . . 13 echoes . . . . . . . . 15 classifieds . . . . . 17 ahobserver.com JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER Carbon monoxide poisoning could have been fatal ‘If it wasn’t for the co-workers showing up ... he would have perished’ Agassiz Fire Chief Wayne Dyer Limited time offer . * ® © 2010 A&W Trade Marks Limited Partnership *Price plus tax. 45921 Wellington, Chilliwack • 604-793-9766 lli starting at $ 399 www.jballamfurniture.com Recliners 7-09 JB23 7070 Pioneer Ave., Agassiz BC _ ZZZFDVFDGHODZFRP MARCO D. CEDRONE 3(5621$/ ,1-85< /$:<(5 NOTARIES PUBLIC Real Estate Transfers|604.796.2925 &

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Life in Agassiz Harrison BC

Text of November 18 2010

  • o f f i c e : 6 0 4 . 7 9 6 . 4 3 0 0 | c l a s s i f i e d s : 6 0 4 . 7 9 6 . 4 3 0 0 | n e w s l i n e : 6 0 4 . 7 9 6 . 4 3 0 2

    The ObserverT H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 8 , 2 0 1 0

    Agassiz Y Harr ison

    $1

    NEWS SERIESPart Two: A look at run-of-river technology at Harrison LakeSee Page 5

    Agassiz man saved by concerned co-workers

    Jessica PetersTHE OBSERVER

    A group of concerned co-workers likely saved an Agassiz man from carbon monoxide poisoning on Sunday morning.

    When the man didn't arrive for work that day, his co-workers found that out of character, and decided to go check up on him at his Morrow Road home.

    They found him in bed, alive but unable to get up.

    They quickly called 911, and Agassiz re ghters arrived on scene, Chief Wayne Dyer said.

    "The place was full of carbon monoxide," he said. "If it wasn't for the co-workers showing up to see why he didn't show up, he would have perished."

    Fire ghters carry around C02 monitors, and the alarm went off immediately when they entered the man's home.

    The man did not have a C02 monitor, which would have gone off and alerted him to the gases that were building up in his home. Dyer says the build up was the result of "issues with his gas furnace, and the hot water tank."

    He stresses that anyone who has a gas appliance in their home should de nitely have a carbon monoxide monitor. The gas is

    virtually undetectable, and can cause death with long exposure.

    Even low exposures to carbon monoxide can cause symptoms, such as nausea, headaches and dizziness.

    Dyer says the man will now be susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning even in small doses. He was taken to Chilliwack Hospital, and then to Vancouver for treatment in a hyperbaric chamber.

    "This was the result of a blocked chimney," Dyer says. "People need to pay attention to their gas appliances. If you have any gas appliances, you need to have a monitor."

    Other incidents the Agassiz Fire Department responded to in the last few weeks include a debris re on McRae Road

    (Nov. 2), lines down on Pioneer and Heath (Nov. 3), a tree re on the Lougheed Hwy. (Nov. 4) and a call to some burn piles on Mt. Woodside (Nov. 5).

    On November 7, a young woman was kicked off a horse on Cemetery Road, and landed on her back. There were no serious injuries in that incident, and she was treated by B.C. Ambulance paramedics.

    An ATV was in a motor vehicle incident on Tuyttens Road on November 13, requiring an emergency call out.

    And while there was the smell of smoke in a building on Hwy. 9, on Nov. 8, there was no re. Also that day, they responded to a call about a broken gas line on Birch Road.

    There were false commercial alarms on Elm Road (Nov. 12) and Tower Road (Nov. 6).

    [email protected]

    Cadet Jessica Sparks stands at attention while Reverend Mary Duncan lays a wreath at the cenotaph in Vimy Park in Agassiz on Remembrance Day. For more photos, see pages 2 and 3.

    Honouring the fallen

    INSIDETHE OBSERVER

    news . . . . . . . . . . 2opinion . . . . . . . . 6mailbag . . . . . . . . 7

    sports . . . . . . . .13echoes . . . . . . . .15classi eds . . . . .17

    ahobserver.com

    JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER

    Carbon monoxide poisoning could have been fatal

    If it wasnt for the co-workers showing up ... he would have

    perished

    Agassiz Fire Chief Wayne Dyer

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  • 2 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

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    OBSERVERnews

    An Agassiz legion member lays down a wreath at the Agassiz cenotaph on Remembrance Day.

    Lest we forget

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    OBSERVERnews

    Remember me, your beloved sonRemember me, your special one

    Remember me, remember meYour long lost angel - your beloved son

    Soldiers dyingPeople crying

    Families torn apartNo one is happy

    Everyone is snappyPeople with broken hearts

    The war is over! Happy at lastWhat about the soldiers who died

    The people criedThe ones who feared

    Who shed a tearStill crying

    Their hearts are dyingSometimes even wishing they were dead

    Remember me, Remember me. Nicole Striker, 10

    Agassiz

    (Top) Former Agassiz music teacher Bob Tunbridge plays The Last Post on the trumpet at 11 a.m. on Remembrance Day in Agassiz, at the cenotaph at Vimy Park. (Centre) The Harrison Highlanders marched in the parade between AESS and the cenotaph. (Bottom) Hundreds of people attended the cer-emonies at the high school and the cenotaph, to pay respect to veterans. A handful of veterans attending the ceremonies at both AESS and the cenotaph. JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER

    Two minutes to remember

  • 4 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

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    OBSERVERnewsGreen waste closure leads to Harrison curbside pickup Jessica PetersTHE OBSERVER

    Green waste will now be picked up curbside in Harrison Hot Springs.

    The decision follows the closure of the green waste collection site, which was becoming a nancial burden to the Village coffers.

    The closure caused a bit of an uproar in the community,

    and plenty of discussion in council meetings.

    The Village held several community discussions to nd a way to either keep the site open, or nd a suitable alternative.

    Economic development of cer Andre Isakov brought a report to council two weeks ago announcing that First Class Waste Services would be

    the company to bring curbside collection to Harrison. The services will begin on January 1, following a series of two open houses. One was held on Tuesday, and another is scheduled for today.

    The services will include garbage pickup, unlimited household recycling and weekly green waste pickup.

    It will be mandatory for all

    single family and duplex units, of which there are about 575 units. The service will be billed through the municipality.

    Multi-family dwellings will have the option of using the service as well, and will be encouraged to contact the Village for arrangements.

    For more information on the open houses, phone the Village at 604-796-2171.

    Proposal made for Agassiz spray parkJessica PetersTHE OBSERVER

    Agassiz could one

    day boast a water park, if a request for provincial funding comes through.

    District of Kent staff has prepared a request to build a spray park and playground in and around the existing playground at Pioneer Park.

    Under the proposal, the current playground

    equipment would also be replaced. The estimated costs of such a project is about $270,000 plus taxes, based on an analysis by van der Zalm + associates.

    A request for funding will be put through the Towns for Tomorrow program, run by the provincial government.

    That's the same program that helped fund the current renovations at Harrison Memorial Hall.

    Towns for Tomorrow offers up to 80 per cent of the cost of infrastructure development. For a project of the estimated cost of the spray park, that would equal a grant

    of about $216,000. The district's portion of the total would come from development cost charges.

    Staff is hoping a spray park would help stimulate the downtown core businesses, and boost participation in events such as the Summer Concert Series and Farmers' Market.

    Stabbing at Kent prisonA ght that broke out

    in the gymnasium of Kent Institution Sunday night ended with one man being sent to hospital.

    Kent of cials say the ght started at

    about 6:45 p.m., during some recreation time. One inmate was stabbed, but is now in stable condition. He is expected to survive his injuries.

    A weapon was

    found on scene, and the assailant has been identi ed and put into the segregation unit. The institution was in lockdown until a search was completed, with all regular visits cancelled.

    Do you use public trails, regional parks or other outdoor playgrounds?

    The Fraser Valley Regional District is hoping anyone who enjoys outdoor recreation will give a few minutes of their time this month.

    The FVRD is working with Metro Vancouver to develop a plan for outdoor recreational demands and trends, and they've created an online survey to target speci c needs.

    The survey asks for general information, along with detailed information about what the types of outdoor activities you participate in, and exactly which large park areas you use, including Harrison area parks.

    It also asks how often you participate in each activity, how far you would travel to enjoy the outdoors and what services you would expect once you get there, such as washrooms, water fountains, children's play areas, marked trails and showers.

    There is also a chance to be heard in regards to what you may feel is lacking in regional parks.

    The survey can be found at www.fvrd.bc.ca, under the heading Hot Topics. It takes about 10 minutes to complete, and will be available online for the public to access until sometime in mid to late November.

    [email protected]

    Local hikers, bikers have a chance to discuss trails

    Anyone who uses the outdoors as a playground is invited to fill out a questionaire online, as part of a FVRD info-gathering process. JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER

  • OBSERVERnews

    Jessica PetersTHE OBSERVER

    Run-of-river projects are stirring up a bit of controversy, as more of the water-diverting power plants are quietly popping up in the Fraser Valley hinterlands.

    But, as our need for power continues to grow, so does the need for power sources, said Graham Horn, executive vice president of Cloudworks Energy. And run-of-river technology has been chosen by B.C. Hydro as a "clean energy" source, offering contracts to companies to construct and operate projects around the province. Cloudworks is among a handful of companies which have won bids to build those projects. While these are being built in many small communities, Cloudworks is focused on areas around Stave Lake and Harrison Lake.

    The basic technology behind these projects is nothing new, Horn explains. Hydropower has been used in North America since the late 1800s, about the time Niagara Falls started

    powering street lights in that city. But even before then, waterwheels (hydropower in its most basic form) were used by ancient civilizations; the Chinese, Romans and Indians all engineered hydropower in some form, often to power machines such as gristmills.

    But there has been a resurgence of the technology, and Horn acknowledges that the projects have some people worried. (See related story below.) When Cloudworks nishes their next projects in the area, they'll have six in total here (producing about the same amount of power needed to run a city the size of Chilliwack). While some people, such as local MLA Barry Penner, tout the wonders of run-of-river projects, others, such as pundit Rafe Mair, use the run-of-river projects to denounce the Liberal party.

    Much of the worry is about effects on the environment. The concerns are valid, Horn told media during a recent trip to Tipella, tiny community within

    the Douglas First Nations at the northern tip of Harrison Lake.

    Yes, Horn admits, they are altering the natural course of waterways, and constructing pipelines and buildings in riparian zones.

    "We do alter the waterways. We do affect the salmon habitat," Horn said, during a helicopter ride to the remote area. "We try to avoid it ... we try to compensate for it."

    In fact, it's a Department of Fisheries and Oceans requirement that they compensate for any environmental impacts.

    "It's very strictly regulated. Our goal is to create more habitat than when we started," he said. "We've spent $3.5 million on compensation channels, and there are already coho and sockeye (in those channels)."

    The media tour he's organized is an attempt to shed some light on the projects, and their long-term goal. Most people will never get to see a run-of-river

    Graham Horn, execu-tive vice president ofCloudworks Energy,points out a fish com-pensation project nearthe Tipella Creek proj-ect. Visible in the back-ground is the penstockand powerhouse. Hornsays that the area sur-rounding the penstockhas been replanted, andeventually wont be sovisible.

    JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER

    Rivers being used for power

    Paddler: Creeks could be dangerousJessica PetersTHE OBSERVER

    Most people will never have the chance to see a run-of-river power station. Most of these hydropower projects are tucked away in hard-to-get-to, heavily-forested corners of the province.

    But Ryan Bayes has seen his fair share of them in the past few years. As an avid white water kayaker and owner of an Abbotsford-based canoe and kayak supply store, he's kayaking

    in local creeks anywhere from 200 to 300 days of the year.

    And so far, he doesn't like what he's seeing.

    Environmentally, Bayes questions the compensation process that businesses like Cloudworks are required to go through. At Tipella Creek, at the north end of Harrison Lake, a pond was built near the powerhouse to offer an alternative habitat for displaced sh. While he admits he's "no sh expert" he feels

    commonsense says it's probably not enough.

    "They say they compensate because they build a little pond," Bayes says. He doesn't feel that's enough for the amount of de-watering that happens at each creek that's been developed. He also worries that the altering of the water ow will change the way sh migrate.

    At one creek, there was a 10 foot ledge that sh could not have

    CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

    CONTINUED ON A3

    AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 5

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  • 6 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

    OBSERVERopinion

    Reason can still prevail on HSTPeter Kingma addressed Harrison Hot Springs council and spoke to the public in November last year, regarding his companys pur-chase of several hundred acres of land within the Village of Harrison.

    Kingma consultation

    Hard road paved for LiberalsGordon Campbells slow fade-to-black

    resignation leaves the Liberals with quite the political challenge.

    Clearly, his decision was made, at least in part, for the bene t of the party. As the most unpopular premier in recent history, the longer that Campbell stayed on, the longer the public discontent with the present government.

    From that perspective, a fast-tracked change of leadership would be a clear advantage to the Liberals.However, its not that simple. The party has two choices available to it select a leader from among its sitting MLAs, or, give someone else the opportunity.

    Its easier and quicker to do the former, yet that carries a serious downside. Anyone from the Liberal benches is an integral part of the governments decisions if not in personal philosophy, certainly by direct association.

    And that will invariably impact votes in the next provincial election.

    On the other hand, if the Liberals clear the way for an outsider, such as Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts who some experts say has strong potential to pull the party from the political re the process is far more complicated.

    Because she doesnt have the pro le of the possible inside contenders, such as Abbotsford MLA Mike de Jong, Watts would have to move fast and effectively to gain enough party support.

    Even so, if Watts or another external candidate were to win the Liberal leadership race, she or he would then need to win a byelection in a vacant constituency to take part in the spring session of the legislature that begins in February. The window for that is very narrow.

    Either way, the Liberals have no easy political road to travel. And theyll do so in a very large shadow, unless Campbell speeds his exit.

    Abbotsford News, Black Press

    B.C. VIEWSTom Fletcher

    Published at Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs, Popkum/Bridal Falls, Rosedale and surrounding areas by the Black Press Group Ltd.Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #116572Copyright and/or property rights sub sist in all material appearing in this issue. Thepublisher shall not be liable for minor changes or er rors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The pub lish ers liability for other errors or omis sions is limited to publication of the ad ver tise ment in a subsequent issue or refund of monies paid for the ad ver tise ment.BC Press Council: The Observer is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the provinces newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to :B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2.For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

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    PUBLISHERANDREW FRANKLIN604-796-4300

    OFFICE HOURSMon-Fri 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed Thur., Sat. and Sun.

    VICTORIA B.C.s rst-ever citizen initiative ballot question couldnt be much simpler.

    Next Sept. 24, those voters who take the time to head down to the polling booth will check Yes or No to the following:

    Are you in favour of extinguishing the HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) and reinstating the PST (Provincial Sales Tax) in conjunction with the GST (Goods and Services Tax)?

    When Premier Gordon Campbell announced a few weeks ago that the government would abide by a simple majority vote, I said it would be mission impossible for the HST to survive. Its chances may now have improved from none to slim.

    The question at least frames the only practical choice. Keep the HST or go back to sales tax status quo, without the refund that petitioner Bill Vander Zalm conjured up to attract signatures.

    I asked Finance Minister Colin Hansen about the question, the fate of the proposed refund and the impact of the 15 per cent personal income tax cut imposed by the outgoing premier.

    Hansen agreed that its important to have a simple question, although the implications for the economy go far beyond the tax at the bottom of your sales slip.

    As for the supposed refund, Vander Zalms proposed HST Extinguishment Act calls for the old PST to be restored retroactive to last July, with any extra tax collected under the new system repaid on an averaged basis.

    But in fact what happens this year is that we would collect slightly less under the HST system than we would have collected had the PST system continued in place, Hansen said. So there would not be any extra revenues to the province, and therefore the whole thing is moot.

    Making the PST retroactive would also mean somehow collecting back taxes on 15 months worth of expenditures that are reduced under HST, such as disposable diapers, hotel rooms and business phone services. This would be administratively as well as politically impossible.

    In short, Vander Zalms proposal cant be done, and the refund he dangled doesnt exist. Its too bad more people didnt understand this before they signed the petition.

    So if you vote Yes next fall, you will still pay the federal GST, and you will get back some form of the old PST, once the provincial government rehires hundreds of tax staff transferred to the federal government.

    A nance ministry brie ng memo, released last week, points out that if B.C. ip- ops and brings back the PST, businesses might leave the province. Some rms that signed contracts based on HST input tax credits may sue the government to recover their losses. B.C.s reputation as a stable place to invest will be damaged.

    Then there is the personal income tax cut, which like the HST is intended to attract investment and jobs. Hansen has already noti ed the Canada Revenue Agency of the 15 per cent reduction, so the income tax deducted from your paycheque will be reduced starting Jan. 1.

    That tax cut will put about $600 million a year into the B.C. consumer economy, a stimulus that will show up in government revenues. But the ministry forecasts it will be several years before growth lls the revenue hole.

    Hansen insisted that even with the income tax cut, the B.C. government can still get out of de cit by 2013 and have some exibility in this springs budget.

    All this of course rests on the assumption of an economy growing and recovering from recession.

    Indulging in the latest wacky B.C. political protest would almost certainly weaken that recovery.

    Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com.

    t [email protected]

    T LOOKING BACK - NOVEMBER 2009

  • OBSERVERmailbag Letters appearing on this page represent the opinions of the letter writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Agassiz-Harrison Observer or its employees.

    1/09

    _QO

    W21uest ion of the week

    Last Weeks Results:

    Do you oppose the run of river projects?

    YES: 26% NO: 73%

    Is the new curbside pickup in Harrison the

    right decision?

    Go to www.ahobserver.com to answer this week's poll

    Q

    War vet lost small medal at ceremoniesDear Editor, I had the pleasure of visiting

    Agassiz last week.Thursday being Remembrance

    Day, my daughter and son-in-law took me to the local high school to take part in your town's commemoration of this special day.

    Wherever I happened to be at the eleventh day of the eleventh month I would take time out to remember.

    This year it was Agassiz. I was very impressed with the planned events.The chosen M.C. kept everything running smoothly. The community's churches chose the

    appropriate readings from holy scripture. The hymn "Make me a channel of your peace" struck me as the correct theme for all mankind to follow. The young people took their part, as did the cadets and military.

    To crown an orderly event, the high school orchestra rendition

    of the New World Symphony was a perfect conclusion before marching to the lay the wreathes. Congratulations to all who worked to make your remembrance very special.

    I am a Second World War veteran. Sadly, I lost a small medal I was given in the Netherlands when

    I visited the liberation event in Holland. If someone nds it please drop it off at this newspaper and they will make sure it is returned to me.

    Thank you for a great visit one I will remember.

    Eileen LittleNanaimo

    Yard clippings dont belong near the riverDear Editor,Two planting of the Miami

    River were done in the rst week of November. The rst on November 2 saw over 20 volunteers from Harrison, Agassiz and Chilliwack plant over 700 shrubs along the 200-block of Miami River Drive. Blackberry removal and knotweed treatment prior to the planting prepared the site for a variety of owering and bank-stabilizing native shrubs. This work is a joint project of the Village of

    Harrison Hot Springs and the Miami River Stream Keepers. The Miami Creek Water Quality Improvement and Environmental Damages Restoration Initiative Project is funded by Environment Canada. The MRSk extend a very big thank you to all volunteers including Mayor Becotte and members of the Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition.

    The second planting took place on November 4 after September removal

    of yellow iris, which, like blackberries, can overwhelm and destabilize the riparian foreshore. Environmental compensation money provided in 2007 to the Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition for the Miami River funds this work. Four leadership students from the Agassiz high school helped members of the MRSk and the FVWC to complete this job on Cedar Avenue. Again, MRSk extend a big thank you to these volunteers.

    The Streamkeepers will help monitor both sites for invasive plants.

    Without routine maintenance, new plantings cannot be successful. Along the Miami River several noxious (legislative backing) and invasive (a plant that has spread and out competed native plants) weeds threaten the environmental health of the system.

    Two major culprits are Japanese Knotweed and Himalayan blackberry.

    The Fraser Valley Invasive Plant Council treated the knotweed in August and September and the Village of Harrison Hot Springs removed blackberry before the 200-block planting.

    H o m e o w n e r s inadvertently introduce two other invasive plants, lamium or silver nettle plant and English ivy. Walk the 400-block of the Miami river Trail to see for yourself. Where these two plants grow sword fern and other

    shrubby natives are lost. Please put your yard waste at a green dump. Never dump yard clippings in the woods or along the river.

    The Miami River Trail network improvements will bene t the health of the river and of local citizens as they get out walking.

    You may meet Ruth Altendorf bumbering along. Thanks again for your support.

    Janne Perrin, for the Miami River Streamkeepers

    AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 7

    Of ce Hours9:00 am - 5:00 pm Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Fridayclosed Thursdays

    Deadlinesadvertising: 4:00 pm Fridayclassifi eds: 10:00 am Tuesday

    Agassiz Harr ison

    604.796.4300#1-7026 Pioneer Ave

    In print every Thursday or see us online 24/7: ahobserver.com

    observer [uhb-zur-ver] noun.

    1.someone or something that observes.

    2.a delegate to an assembly or gathering, who is sent to observe and report but not to take part officially in its activities.

    3. HISTORY in the MAKING.

    SudokuNov. 18, 2010

    Intermediate Level

    Rave Reviews...Rave Reviews...While on vacation in Mexico,

    Chloe, a ritzy Beverly Hills chihuahua, finds herself lost and in need of

    assistance in order to get back home.

    The Observer, Petros Pizza, The Video Station, and The Adventure Park at Tugboat Junction are inviting kids up to the age of 12 years to join the Observer Fun Club. When your name appears in this section, come in to the Observer offi ce with this clipping and you will receive:

    a free pizza from Pizza Plus a free movie rental from the Video Station a free activity pass from The Adventure Park at Tugboat Junction

    a free book from the Agassiz Public Library upon presenting the birthday letter to them. Agassiz Harr ison

    FUNclubFUNclub

  • OBSERVERcommunity

    project, because of their locations, and Horn is hoping to inform the public through newspaper and magazine stories. They also held a public information meeting last

    week in Chilliwack. The tour was

    thorough, with a y-over of current and proposed projects, a tour of the generating station and powerhouse at Tipella Creek, along with a hike to the original Tipella

    Creek waterfall, where water continues to fall during the freshet.

    And this is how it works, as explained through the tour.

    Run-of-river works best in waterfalls with a grade of at least 10 per

    cent, because the force of the water moving downward is what's causing the energy.

    "The higher the elevation, the better," Horn said.

    Water is diverted into a generating station, after falling through a screen that lters out sh and river debris. Only the water that's needed goes through the screen and into the station. The rest of the water carries down the hill, as it would have naturally.

    The captured water falls through a pipeline, called a penstock. Sometimes that penstock is buried, other times it sits above the ground, depending

    on the topography of each project. The development of these penstocks has created clearcut swaths through the forest, visible from land and the air. These have been replanted and will eventually be virtually undetectable, Horn said. And at Tipella, Douglas First Nation elders made the decision as to what trees and shrubs would be planted.

    The water is sent to a powerhouse, where it ows through two turbines. The turbines create the energy, which is sent to a switchyard. Some of the energy is siphoned off right away, for Cloudworks to power its operations.

    (One powerhouse requires about 10 times the average household.) The rest of the energy ows into B.C. Hydro's main power supply.

    Back at the powerhouse, once the water ows through the turbines, it ows out into what is called the tailrace. The tailrace is essentially a new waterway that connects the water that was diverted back to the natural water ow.

    From that convergence, the river carries on as it would have.

    The Douglas First Nation sees the projects as a step forward.

    Daryl Peters, former Chief of the band, said

    the project strengthens the small community's economy, and produces less of a footprint than logging.

    It also comes at a time when B.C. Hydro and three communities at the north end of Harrison have nally connected. As of November 12, the power lines that have hovered over their heads for 30 years are now connected to their homes.

    That means no more diesel generators burning fuel night and day, to provide power for the 50 people who live on the reservation.

    "We're hoping to catch up to the rest of B.C. now," he said. [email protected]

    moved through. However, development turned that ledge into a rolling incline, allowing sh to move further upstream.

    The sh are an important factor in river health, but there are other impacts Bayes feels should be considered.

    There is a "global paddling community" that sees B.C., and notably the Fraser Valley, as one of the most pristine areas to enjoy white water activities. Many

    of his customers are European tourists, here speci cally to paddle our rivers. They tell Bayes that in Europe, run-of-river projects have been built on virtually every river that was previously a paddling spot.

    That's because run-of-river projects and paddling are done in the same ideal locations glacier-fed rivers with high inclines and plenty of water supply.

    There are about 10 rivers that are "paddlable" in the Harrison Lake area. Three of those are

    either already sites of power projects, or slated to become them. Those are Douglas Creek, Fire Creek and Tipella Creek. The development means a loss in paddling areas, and Bayes says tourists are taking note.

    "They rent a kayak and go tour around, and they come back and say 'you guys are doing what we did. We ruined it.'" Bayes says.

    While paddlers could, and do, portage around the areas used by power companies, there are new dangers in those waterways now, he says.

    The power plant can unexpectedly ush large amounts of water into a creek. For a paddler downstream, that could be not only dangerous,

    but lethal. "There's warning

    signs," he says, but no warning as to when it may happen.

    Bayes has been to a public information meeting on the subject, held recently in Chilliwack. But he also has spoken out online. There is a government website page that is open to comment on the subject, and Bayes has contributed to a blog, as well.

    Public comment is open until November 25.

    For more information, visit fraservalleywhitewater.com/misc/bc-creeks-need-your-help/ or www.fraservalleywhitewater.com. [email protected]

    CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

    The higher the elevation, the better

    High inclines best for paddlers, tooCONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

    8 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

    15TH ANNUAL15TH ANNUAL

    Fraser Valley

    Bald Eagle Bald Eagle Festival

    ALSOALSOFEATURING:FEATURING:

    Join the fun... Join the fun... and become a steward

    of the Fraser Valley. 4 eagle viewing sites and

    8 activity sites from Mission to Chilliwack

    NEW FOR 2010 IS THE ADDITION OF THE

    STSAILES HEALING CENTRE.Indoor Green ExpoEagle ViewingJet Boat ToursSonsie the EagleVancouver ZooExpert SpeakersEducational DisplaysChildrens CraftsWalking ToursArtisans DemosSouvenirsWildlife ViewingGreat Food

    The of cial EAGLE FLYERS are now out, pick up your copy today at the Mission Regional Chamber of Commerce or download online.

    Grab your 2010 Souvenir Button and visit Harrisons Hot Spots to nd out what special perks are waiting just for you.

    wwwwww.fraservalleybaldeaglefestival..fraservalleybaldeaglefestival.caca

    FOR MORE INFO VISIT

    NOVEMBER 20-21NOVEMBER 20-21STST

    SPONSORED BY

    Agassiz Y Harr ison

    chilliwack bruins

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    Kick back and relax in the chic, lodge-style one bedroom suite complete with replace, private deck and full kitchen. Enjoy 2, one hour massages - together, or individually in your own private spa room. Stroll the streets of nearby Courtenay, then enjoy dinner at the Old House Restaurant. Read all the details at www.getawaybc.com then enter to win!

    a romantic getaway to

    OLD HOUSE VILLAGE HOTEL & SPA in the heart of the Comox Valley.

    Saturday, December 4th HHS Elementary School Gym

    9 am & 10:30 am seatingsTickets $5

    Includes pancake breakfast made fresh by Oasis Bistro, craft table, colouring

    contest, story time with librarian Terrell, music, & a raffle that includes a chance to win a Nintendo DSI XL!

    Breakfast with SANTA

    For tickets call: [email protected]

    PRESENTED BY Harrison Hot Springs Preschool,After School Care

    and The Village of Harrison Hot Springs

  • AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 9NO

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    /P.POUIMZ1BZNFOUT

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    BIWEEKLY/ 84 MONTHSWITH $1,049 DOWN

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    4."35163$)"4&'*/"/$*/(

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    Call Gardner Chevrolet Buick GMC at 604-869-9511, or visit us at 945 Water Avenue, Hope. [License #7287]

    Ruby Creek Art GalleryRuby Creek Art Gallery5 t h A n n u a l

    Chr istmasChristmasOpen HouseOpen HouseNovember 20th3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

    Featuring Guest Artist:Crystal Chapman-Prevost

    Art & MusicRefreshments & Door Prizes

    5 8 6 1 1 Lougheed Hwy. , A g a s s i z , BC 5 8 6 1 1 Lougheed Hwy. , A g a s s i z , BC || 604 - 7 96 -0740 604 - 7 96 -0740

    OBSERVERcommunity

    Four AESS leadership students helped the Fraser Valley Watershed Coalition with planting along the Miami River on November 4. The FVWCs planting coordinator Rachel Drennan is at the far right. The students are (from left) Kassandra Morin, Andy Phillips, Brittlene Schindle and Jolene Baker.

    Planting the future

    SUBMITTED PHOTO

  • 10 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

    *Based on total service disruptions and outages experienced by clients in the past year. Offer available until December 31, 2010, to residential clients in select locations. Plan rates apply to direct-dialled long distance calls only. Calls terminating in the 218 and 712 areacodes and overseas calls terminating on a wireless phone or audio text facilities may be subject to higher rates. 911 fees and taxes are extra. TELUS Long Distance terms of service apply; visit telus.com for details. **Does not include extension of network facilities. Onlyavailable in deregulated local service areas. Visit about.telus.com/publicpolicy/LSlookup.html to see if your local service area is deregulated. 2010 TELUS.

    Call 310-1144 or visit telus.com/homephone

    Now you can get the most reliable Home Phone* in a bundle for only $21/month.

    TELUS Home Phone works even during a power outage, which not every home

    phone service can claim. Switch to TELUS and youll also get:

    1 Calling Feature of your choice

    4/minute long distance calling within Canada and to the U.S.

    No installation fees**

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    Visit our other Black Press sites

    4BWF5JNF4BWF.POFZ

    OBSERVERcommunityThe 13th Annual Fraser Valley Metis

    Association Harvest Dinner & Dance will be held on Saturday November 27 at Yarrow Community Hall.

    Doors open at 6 p.m. Harvest Dinner Prayer at 6:30 p.m. (only 200 tickets will be sold)

    Tickets are $20, available at Bigfoot Moccasin, or by calling 604-853-3936 (Abbotsford), Chilliwack Metis Association President Les Mitchell at 604-823-4533, or Marie Carter at 604-859-8789.

    Metis traditional food will be served

    with entertainment. Jigging & ddling will be by Lisa Shepherd, Amy Eusterling, Keith Hill & Ron Gerard.

    Betty Gladue will be giving a lesson in playing the spoons.

    Please bring a non-perishable donation for the Blade Runners Program.

    Metis Harvest dinner in Yarrow

    The AESS grad class has found a way to put fun back into fundraiser.

    They'll be holding their AESS Grad Fashion Show on Thursday, November 25 in the school gymnasium.

    Doors open at 6 p.m. and show time is at 7 p.m.

    There will be a loonie concession and a silent auction. Tickets are $5 and children under ve years of age get in free.

    Fashion show for AESS grads

    Are you in the market for a new pair of eyeglasses? Chances are, someone in developing countries would love to receive your old pair.

    The Agassiz Harrison Lions Club collects old eyeglasses and helps distribute them to people in need around the world. You can drop your unused pairs at locations around Agassiz, including The Observer.

    Eyeglass donations

  • AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 11

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    2006 AUDI A4 CABRIO22222000000000066666 AAAAAUUUUUDDDDDIIIII AAAAA44444 CCCCCCAAAAABBBBBRRRRRIIIIIOOOOOO

    $$19,99819,998

    Air, Tinted glass, Keyless Entry

    109,000kmsstk#7010b

    $$9,9989,998

    2005 MAZDA 3 SEDAN22222200000000000055555 MMMMMMAAAAAAZZZZZZDDDDDDAAAAAA 333333 SSSSSSEEEEEEDDDDDDAAAAAANNNNNN

    SL A.W.D SUN-ROOF ALLOYS,

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    74,000kmsstk#CM219

    2006 MAZDA TRIBUTE F.W.D.22222000000000066666 MMMMMAAAAAZZZZZDDDDDAAAAA TTTTTRRRRRIIIIIBBBBBUUUUUTTTTTEEEEE FFFFF.WWWWW.DDDDD.

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    1 owner, Local, Auto, A/C, Spoiler

    101,000kmsstk#1437A

    2004 MAZDA 6 GS22222000000000044444 MMMMMAAAAAZZZZZDDDDDAAAAA 66666 GGGGGGSSSSSS

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    3 to choose from incl. a speed, all under 65,000kms

    stk#CM244

    2004 MAZDA MIATA22222000000000044444 MMMMMAAAAAZZZZZDDDDDAAAAA MMMMMIIIIIAAAAATTTTTAAAAA

    $$13,99813,998

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    6 SPEED, LEATHER, SUNROOF,

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    5 SPEED ONLY 71000 KM, CM280

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  • 12 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

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    STRESS Take a

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    Leau de Vie is a beautiful, relaxing spa where once ensconced, you will oat away from everyday stresses and nd your inner calm.

    Simply bring your entry form to the Observer of ce at 7026 Pioneer Avenue, Agassiz by 4 pm, November 22nd, 2010. Prize is as awarded.

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    Agassiz Harr ison

    OBSERVERsports

    C.E. Barrys Justin Dolan battles for the ball in a game versus the Agassiz grade 7 boys at Agassiz on Monday. Hope was beaten earlier by Chilliwack Middle School but rallied to tie Agassiz 20-20 in the final game. Agassiz had edged CMS in the first game of the three-school round robin.

    High school hoops

    BARRY STEWART/ BLACK PRESS

    604-796-4302

    SHARE SOME NEWS!

    If you have any stories or events that you

    would like to see in the Observer, either

    email a letter to the editor at:

    [email protected]

    or call at:

  • OBSERVERcommunityDr. Pearson to speak at bald eagle festival

    Sonsie the eagle looks at her handler at the 2009 Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival.

    JESSICA PETERS / OBSERVER

    An evening with Dr. Mike Pearson has been added to the list of events for the Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival.

    The festival runs throughout this weekend, in key points around the Valley, celebrating the annual return of the eagles to this region.

    The festival is designed for the entire family. It is educational, fun and with eleven venues participating, nding a location to enjoy the eagles is easy. It features excellent eagle watching, a wide range of activities, environmental presentations, nature walks, displays, speakers and more.

    Dr. Pearson will be speaking about "Species at Risk in the Eastern Fraser." That will be at Kilby Historic Site on Sunday, November 21, at 1 p.m. Dr. Pearson, an Agassiz-based ecologist, will speak on habitat restoration and species at risk in our region.

    He'll use photographs and maps to introduce local species at risk, particularly lesser known examples. He will discuss the state of habitat protection in British Columbia and common trends in the Fraser Valley area. He'll also discuss local species recovery efforts.

    Dr. Pearson holds a Ph.D. in Resource Management and

    Environmental Science from UBC for his work on the biology and management of two endangered sh; the Salish sucker and the Nooksack dace. He currently runs Pearson Ecological, a small consulting rm specializing in species at risk and aquatic habitat restoration. He is also lead author

    of the web site Species at Risk and Local Government: A Primer for British Columbia.

    For more information, call Kilby Historic Site at 604-796-9576. Or to download your 2010 Eagle Festival Program, visit www.fraservalleybaldeaglefestival.com.

    Got a sports tip, photo or story?

    email: [email protected]

    AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 13

    0%PURCHASE FINANCING

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  • 14 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

    When your child chooses science, theyre choosing more than a rewarding career. Theyre choosing to contribute, achieve and have their thinking recognized. And to start

    them off right, were even offering one potential scientist a $25,000 scholarship.

    To learn more, visit yearofsciencebc.ca

    F i n e J e w e l l e r y S i n c e 1 9 8 1

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    we buy gold!

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    Pursuant to Section 26(3) of the Community Charter, the District of Kent intends to lease the property at 1989 Green Road.1) The legal description of the property is: PID: 003-418-308 Legal Description: Lot 45 District Lot 19 Group 1 New Westminster District

    Plan 63921 As shown as hatched area below.

    The District of Kent intends to lease the property as a protective services residence to encourage members to reside in the community. If the District cannot secure an applicable protective services tenant, the option to lease would be extended to the general public.

    The lease shall commence in January 2011. The property would be leased at a minimum of $30,600 over a THREE (3) year period, plus utilities.Wallace MahChief Administrative Of cer

    Public NoticeProposed Property Disposition

    Partnership Lease

    OBSERVERcommunity

    Submitted by Hans Mulder SECOND LIEUTENANT, 1789 ROYAL CANADIAN ARMY CORPS

    After hosting an air cadet squadron from PEI in 2009, 2010 was the

    1789 Royal Westminster Regiment Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps turn to travel.

    For the 2010

    I n t e r p r o v i n c i a l Exchange, 1789 was selected to visit 213 Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps QuAppelle

    in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Twenty cadets and two of cers left Abbotsford International Airport at 6:30 a.m. on October 14. Upon arrival in Winnipeg, the corps moved into the transient quarters at CFB Winnipeg 17 Wing.

    The following morning, the Army and Sea Cadets met at the Manitoba Legislature for a tour of the building and grounds, graciously hosted by the Manitoba Attach for Military Affairs.

    After an excellent lunch at 17 Wings All Ranks Mess, the combined corps marched over to Hanger 16 for a look at the C130 Hercules and more. Split up into several groups, the cadets received an introduction to the Hercules, a SAR techs job and equipment, the Dash-8 radar operator training craft, and the aircraft maintenance shop.

    For such an excellent tour, many thanks to the CF members based out of Hanger 16. In gratitude, these members received the 1789 Royal

    Westminster Regiment RCACC commemorative coin.

    That evening, the cadets gathered at the Unique Corral for a sample of ranch life, including a cadet-sized western town, moonlight hay rides by James and Jade (the Clydesdales) and hot chocolate and cookies around a roaring bon re.

    For Saturday, the two corps were introduced to early life on the prairie at Fort Whyte. The enlightening tour included baking bannock on a stick over the re (and eating it!), learning about various useful plants, visiting both a tipi and a sod house, and learning to hunt bison the native way. This included lessons in throwing spears and how to construct and use a crush to stampede and capture the herd. After a morning in bracing wind it was nice to get into the warmth at the Royal Canadian Mint. Here, all of Canadas circulation coins are produced, as well as coins for more than 70 other countries.

    We are happy to report there were no arrests as a result of this tour, mostly because the gold bar had a logging chain attached to it, and two watchful and armed mint of cers. Unfortunately, photographs were not permitted.

    That evening before the Manitoba Moose hockey game, we paid a visit to 213 RCSCCs home; Winnipegs stone frigate HMCS Chippewa. This was quite interesting as it also houses the Manitoba Maritime museum. There was a quiz to follow the tour, with the prizes including Navy thunder sticks, perfect for cheering on the Vancouver Canucks farm team.

    Unfortunately, the Manitoba Moose lost to the Grand Rapids Grif ns, 3-2, despite the massive sea and army cadet cheering section, which made it onto the Jumbotron several times.

    For their last day together, the sea and army cadet corps toured the Manitoba Museum. The tour started with

    fossils and dinosaurs and progressed to native bison and caribou hunting, the fur trade and the formation of the Hudsons Bay Company. This was particularly exciting, as the Museum houses the replica of the Nonesuch, HBCs rst ship, reconstructed and sailed from Portsmouth for the 300 year anniversary of the company. After silent Charlie Chaplin icks in the 1930s Winnipeg exhibit, the cadets took in lms about the Swiss Alps and about whales and dolphins at the IMAX.

    Then it was time to prepare for the mess dinner.

    Uniforms were washed and pressed, shirts were starched, and the navy mess rules fervently memorized. Despite all this preparation, several cadets were tried and convicted by the head table presiding over kangaroo court for various infractions, real or imagined. The guards (cadets who forgot their Westie challenge coins) were unable to protect the gavel (or complicit in the plot), and hilarity continued for some time. A paddle with marvellous rope work was presented to 1789 RCACC on the occasion of their visit, which was reciprocated by the presentation of a handsome Royal Westminster Regiment plaque. After the Loyal Toast, the mess was adjourned and cadets socialized and danced the night awayor at least until 11:30 p.m. Then with declarations of eternal friendship and email addresses yelled from the bus windows, we left 213 RCSCC for our last night at 17 Wing before ying home.

    Local cadets tour cool Winnipeg spots

  • AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010 15

    Victims Matter.

    The Government of Canada is taking action for victims of crime. So can you.

    Find the information you need at:

    VictimsMatter.gc.ca1 800 O-Canada

    OBSERVERcommunity

    Golf pro Rhodes honoured 50 Years Ago, 1960In the 1960s the Fraser Valley Regional

    Library offered its services to rural residents by providing a book van which made stops every second Tuesday at Lake Errock, Harrison Mills, Harrison River, Mountain (now known as Mount Woodside), and the Sasquatch. The schedule was listed in the local paper for residents reference.

    The Agassiz Library was situated in the Kent Municipal Hall and the Harrison Hot Springs branch operated in their Village Hall.

    The local golf pro at the Harrison Golf Course, Hal Rhodes, was honoured by being made a life member of the BC Professional Golfers Association, joining a very select and small number of people.

    By this time, Mr. Rhodes had mastered four highly successful careers encompassing a wide variety of interests. He had been a successful land surveyor with his own company, a businessman marketing outdoor goods, a respected professional golfer and a high-quality professional photographer.

    He attributed his success to admitting

    his own lack of knowledge and weighing the ideas of experienced men under him before deciding how to proceed.

    The rst rugby match between the Old Boys and the high school players was played in November of 1960. It was reported that the Old Boys took the match by using their experience to capitalize on a few lucky breaks and by kicking the ball out of bounds whenever they needed a rest.

    Echoes From the Past is submitted weekly by the Agassiz Harrison Historical Society.

    ECHOES FROM THE PAST

    Recognition for peace officers at All Saints

    Peace of cers and correctional of cers don't have the easiest jobs.

    And a day has been set aside to recognize the hard, and sometimes dangerous, work that they carry out every day, in an effort to make our communities safer.

    The Second Annual Peace Of cers and Correctional Of cers Appreciation Day will be held on Sunday, November 21 this year.

    And to mark the day, a special service will once again be held at All Saints Anglican Church.

    The celebration will begin in the regular church service, beginning at 10 a.m. Lunch, pipers and special guest speakers from the correctional system will follow.

    For more information, phone 604-796-3103.

    The All Saints Anglican Church is located at 6904 Lougheed Hwy., in Agassiz.

    Observer staff

    Food driveThe annual Agassiz re ghters food drive will take place on Thursday, December 2 this year.

    Fire ghters will spend the evening going door to door, collecting donations for the Agassiz Community Services food bank.

    Watch for them from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and have your non-perishable food items ready to donate.

    AGASSIZ-HARRISON MILLS DRAINAGE AREA

    Annual General Meeting Centennial Center in Municipal Hall7XHVGD\z1RYHPEHUUG

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  • OBSERVERcommunity

    Harrison teen heading to World Youth Day in Madrid Ruth AltendorfFOR THE OBSERVER

    Regina Wenk is only 18 years of age, but has achieved so much already.

    After graduating with honour in eight subjects from Agassiz senior secondary, she is now enrolled in a Bachelor of Arts program at the University of British Columbia.

    Regina grew up in Harrison Hot Springs. She took dancing lessons since she was ve years of age, was a member of the Agassiz High School Band (one of her honour subjects) and has become an accomplished dancer, musician and vocalist.

    But while reading Reginas portfolio, it becomes quite clear that, though she excelled in all her school subjects, she never lost sight at all of the other parts of life and,

    as a result, has a very well-rounded education.

    She has been a member of the Agassiz St. Anthonys Youth Group, has sponsored a ve year old boy from the Philippines, and has been volunteering for the Harrison Festival of the Arts, to name only a few of her endeavors.

    Currently, while living at UBC, she is now a certi ed member of the PS98 Music Ministry and is involved with a group of talented young musicians.

    The group will be part of a Grace and Gratitude Concert on November 27, 2010 at the Christian School in Agassiz. Their aim is to raise funds for a trip to the World Youth Day 2011 which will take place in Madrid, Spain.

    To take part in the World Youth Day 2008 in Sydney, Australia

    must have been an unforgettable experience for these young people.

    Should you not be able to attend the concert in Agassiz, you can help the group by buying their PS98 Grace and Gratitude CD which will, and I quote, present stunning arrangements and sparklig original compositions and share the amazing faith experience from their journey to the World Youth Day 2008 in Sydney, Australia.

    Should you be interested in more information, contact Emee Wenk, the current St. Anthonys Youth Coordinator, at 604-796-3116.

    While reading Reginas portfolio, I could not help but be very impressed.

    I am looking forward to hear more about her in the future and wish her the best in all her undertakings!Regina Wenk is fundraising for a trip to attend World Youth

    Day in Madrid next year.

    Meet the ProsTo be featured inBEST Rates! Chris @ 604.796.4301

    16 AGASSIZ-HARRISON OBSERVER Thursday, November 18, 2010

    Community CornerNovember 2010The ObserverAgassiz Harr isonUnited Church Christmas Tea, Bazaar & Bake Sale - Sat., Nov. 20th 1:30 - 3 pm Donations at the door. (Agassiz)

    Preschool Storytime @ Agassiz Library. Every Friday, 10:15 am Fun, stories, a little noise, a snack & coffee break too. Free program, drop-in, all welcome.

    Breakfast with Santa presented by Harrison Hot Springs Preschool & After School Care & The Village of Harrison Hot Springs, Saturday December 4 at HHS Elementary School Gym, 9am and 10:30am seatings. Tickets $5. Includes pancake breakfast made fresh by Oasis Bistro, craft table, colouring contest, story time with librar-ian Terrell, music, and a raf e that includes a chance to win a Nintendo DSI XL! For tickets call 604-796-8738. [email protected]

    Lego Build-Up @ Agassiz Library. Nov. 18, with a special building day on Friday Nov. 19 at 3:30 pm. Awards day, Saturday, Nov. 20. All ages welcome. FMI call your library 604-796-9510.

    PS98 (Psalm 98) Music Minis-trys Grace and Grati