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Nomadic Design

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Guest lecture by Emma Bown

Text of Nomadic Design

  • Nomadic Design Emma Bowen Mobility and Territory, March 19, 2013

    Nomad camp near Tan Tan, South Morocco. Harry Gruyaert, 1986 for Magnum Photos.

    !

  • Oxford Dictionarys Definition of Nomad: nomad Syllabification: (nomad) Pronunciation: /nmad/ noun a member of a people having no permanent abode, and who travel from place to place to find fresh pasture for their livestock. a person who does not stay long in the same place; a wanderer. Origin: late 16th century: from French nomade, via Latin from Greek nomas, nomad - 'roaming in search of pasture', from the base of nemein 'to pasture

    Nomadic Design (Fall 2013) Students Definition of Nomad: nomad Syllabification: (nomad) Pronunciation: /nmad/ noun a member of a community of adapters.

    Nomadic Design Introduction

  • Constant movement in space hones the senses differently. The unique sensibility is also the end product

    of a life of constant and complete integration with the landscape: the nomadic tradition embraces a different

    sensibility about the natural environment than that found in the Western sedentary tradition. The extent of human life is not to oppose and endeavor to control nature, but

    rather to maintain a dialogue with the natural environment in order to find union with it; only by doing

    so can the nomad survive.

    !

    - Labelle Prussin, African Nomadic Architecture

    Nomadic Design Introduction

  • [Home]is a world in which a person can create a material environment that embodies what he or she

    considers significant. In this sense the home becomes the most powerful sign of the self of the inhabitant who

    dwells within.

    - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Eugene Rochberg-Halton, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self

    Nomadic Design Introduction

  • Gypsies, 1961, Wladyslaw Slesicki Nomadic Design Introduction

  • Nomadic Design Themes and Lessons

    1. Cultivating a symbiotic relationship with the environment.

    The extent of human life is not to oppose and endeavor to control nature, but rather to maintain a dialogue with the natural environment in order to find union with it; only by

    doing so can the nomad survive. !

    "!Labelle!Prussin,"African"Nomadic"Architecture"

  • Nomadic Design Themes and Lessons

    2. Creating rituals steeped in human interaction within and outside of the community.

    Gypsy culture is created sometimes through conflict and usually through specific exchange. In contrast to the classical paradigms, Gypsy culture emerges from culture

    contact, rather than being an isolate destroyed or undermined by contact. !

    "!Judith!Okely, Deterritorialised and Spatially Unbounded Cultures within Other Regimes"

  • 3. Creating a material culture of bricolage.

    One skirt or a blouse was often made from several pieces of material colored and patterned in different ways.We must not forget, however, that the clothing of some

    Romanies did not reflect so much the countries they passed through as rather poverty, which was their permanent traveling companion.

    !

    - Jana Horvthov, Devleskere have: Svedectvom Starch Pohladnc

    Nomadic Design Themes and Lessons

  • Vincent Van Gogh, Detail of Gypsy

    Camp, 1888. Oil on canvas. Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Martin Marencin for The New York Times,

    April 2, 2010 Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

    Aaron Huey for National Geographic, http://

    www.aaronhuey.com/#/national-geographic-magazine---pine-ridge/

    PINERIDGE_1200p_114

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

    Scene from The Long, Long Trailer, 1953

    Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Space is a fundamental category for any form of power.

    - Anselm Franke (2003) Territories in Territories: Islands, Camps and other States of Utopia

    Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Quinn Norton, 2011 for Wired. Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other Kevin Hagen, 2011

    For New York Daily News.

  • Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other (or, On Nomadism and Capitalism)

  • Michel Foucault Edward Said Labelle Prussin

    Nomadic Design Nomadism as Other

  • Nomadic Design Appropriation as Control or Flattery?

  • Nomadic Design Subverting Control through Design

  • Tokyo Blues: Settlement (Park)

    III, Nurri Kim Nomadic Design Subverting Control through Design

  • Nomadic Design As Our Present and Future

    XS House, Tumbleweed Tiny

    Houses

  • Nomadic Design As Our Present and Future

    Tahrirs Summer Canopy in

    Egypt Reports, Sharif Abdel Kouddous,

    July 10, 2011

  • Nomadic Design As Our Present and Future

    "Now that our smartphones and tablets and pocketbooks have made us wireless and have set us free we are able to work everywhere and anytime we want; sitting down in a caf, laying still in bed, walking in the fields, doing shopping, in flight and in waiting or at the kitchen table to search for some recipes at the same time. As a result we no longer need a desk or an office and are able to completely reinvent our existence and timetables.We are free to roam and wander... under this influence we will again become nomadic and are without knowing it going back to the beginning of mankind.The prognosis is that our species will in fact become super nomads with our world as their field of action.

  • 175 million people on the planet living in more or less voluntary exile; about 10 million more every year; professional nomadism increasingly commonplace; unprecedented circulation of goods and services; the formation of transnational political entities

    couldnt this novel situation give rise to a new way of conceptualizing cultural identity?

    For contemporary creators are already laying the foundations for a radicant artradicant being a term designating an organism that grows its roots and adds new ones as it advances. To be radicant

    means setting ones roots in motion, staging them in heterogeneous contexts and formats, denying them the power to completely define ones identity, translating ideas, transcoding

    images, transplanting behaviors, exchanging rather than imposing.

    - Nicolas Bourriaud, The Radicant

    Nomadic Design As Our Present and Future