Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, Second Edition

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Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, Second Edition. Chapter 7 Advanced Installation. Objectives. Describe the types and structure of SCSI devices Identify default IRQs, I/O addresses, and DMAs Explain how Plug-and-Play can be used to assign configuration to peripheral devices - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, Second EditionChapter 7Advanced Installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • ObjectivesDescribe the types and structure of SCSI devicesIdentify default IRQs, I/O addresses, and DMAsExplain how Plug-and-Play can be used to assign configuration to peripheral devicesExplain how APM and ACPI can be used to control power to peripheral devices

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Objectives (continued)Outline the steps used to install Linux from source files on a DVD, hard disk, or network serverUnderstand methods used to automate the Linux installationInstall Red Hat Fedora Linux using a kickstart fileTroubleshoot the installation process

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Advanced Hardware Configuration: SCSI Hard Disk Drive ConfigurationTerminator: Prevents signals from bouncing back and forth on a cableSCSI ID: Uniquely identifies devices attached to a SCSI controllerTarget IDIdentifies priorityLogical Unit Number (LUN): Unique ID for each device attached to a node in a SCSI chain

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Advanced Hardware Configuration: SCSI Hard Disk Drive Configuration (continued)Figure 7-1: Connecting SCSI devices

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Advanced Hardware Configuration: SCSI Hard Disk Drive Configuration (continued)Table 7-1: Common SCSI standards

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Advanced Hardware Configuration: SCSI Hard Disk Drive Configuration (continued)Figure 7-2: A 50-pin Centronics SCSI connectorFigure 7-3: A 50-pin LPT SCSI connector

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Advanced Hardware Configuration: SCSI Hard Disk Drive Configuration (continued)Figure 7-4: A 68-pin LPT SCSI connector

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O AddressesIRQs: Method for peripheral devices to share processor timePrioritize simultaneous service requestsPolling: Processor polls devices to determine tasks to be runDifficult to prioritizeInterruption: Processor interrupted by devices when resources neededPrioritize via IRQ

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses (continued)Figure 7-5: IRQ priorities

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses (continued)Table 7-2: Default IRQ assignments

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses (continued)I/O address: Identifies working space in RAM for peripheral devicesDMA: Allows devices direct physical memory access via unique channelsImproves system performance

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses (continued)Table 7-3: Default I/O address assignments

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Mainboard Flow Control: IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses (continued)Table 7-4: Default DMA assignments

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Plug-and-PlayPnP: Automatically assigns configuration information to devicesIRQs, I/O addresses, DMAsUses BIOS information to avoid conflictsComplimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS): Memory on mainboard used to store configuration information for boot process

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • APM and ACPIAPM: Shuts off power to peripheral components as neededConfigured in BIOSAdvanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI): Configures peripherals power setting from OSMonitor CPU temperature and battery powerStandby mode and sleep modeLinux ACPI Client: Utility used to view ACPI settings

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • RAID ConfigurationFault tolerant: Device exhibiting minimum downtime after failureRedundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID): Combines several HDDs storage spaceHardware- or software-basedSeven raid configurations

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • RAID Configuration (continued)Spanning: Two HDDs seen as one volumeRAID level 0, not fault tolerantDisk striping: Write separate information to different HDDsRAID level 0, not fault tolerantDecreases read/write timeDisk mirroring: Two identical hard disksRAID level 1, fault tolerant

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • RAID Configuration (continued)Disk striping with parity: Write separate information to HDDs and maintain parity informationRAID level 5, fault tolerantParity bits indicate what data is whereCan be used to re-generate data when HDD failsRequires three HDDs minimumMost common RAID configuration

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • RAID Configuration (continued)Figure 7-6: Organization of data on RAID level 5

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Installation MethodsInternational Standards Organization (ISO) image: Large file containing exact copy of contents of a CD-ROM or DVDCD-ROM is the most common and easiest method for installing LinuxOther methods for installing Linux DVDNetwork serverLocal hard disk

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • DVD InstallationSimilar to CD-ROM installationOnly one DVD required, as opposed to multiple CD-ROMs

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk InstallationMay install Linux directly from ISO images on hard diskMust have sufficient free space outside partition containing ISO imagesCreate installation startup CD-ROM or bootable USB flash memory driveBoot from this to start installationInstallation will be text-based

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk Installation (continued)Figure 7-7: Installation welcome screen

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk Installation (continued)Figure 7-8: Language selection screen

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk Installation (continued)Figure 7-9: Keyboard selection screen

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk Installation (continued)Figure 7-10: Selecting an installation method

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Hard Disk Installation (continued)Figure 7-11: Specifying source file location for a hard disk-based installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Network-Based InstallationsRequires installation startup CD-ROM or bootable USB flash memory driveContains NIC drivers and programs allowing connection to serverInstallation via one of following protocols:Network File System (NFS)File Transfer Protocol (FTP)Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)Must configure network settings

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Network-Based Installations (continued)Figure 7-12: Configuring local network settings

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Network-Based Installations (continued)Figure 7-13:Specifying source file location for an NFS-based installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Network-Based Installations (continued)Figure 7-14: Specifying source file location for an FTP-based installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Network-Based Installations (continued)Figure 7-15: Specifying source file location for an HTTP-based installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Automating Linux InstallationsDeploy several Linux servers and workstations requiring same configurationDisk imaging software: Duplicates HDD contents from one computer to anothere.g., Symantec GhostTypically loaded from boot floppy diskCopy whole partitions or HDDs to other HDDsLocally or across network

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Automating Linux Installations (continued)Figure 7-16: Symantec Ghost

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Automating Linux Installations (continued)Kickstart file: Automated installation scriptSpecifies normal OS installation choicesks.cfgKickstart Configuration: Configure a new kickstart fileTo use ks.cfg: Format floppy with ext2, copy ks.cfg to itBoot from installation startup CD-ROMAt welcome screen, specify ks.cfg file

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Automating Linux Installations (continued)Figure 7-17: The Kickstart Configurator

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Troubleshooting InstallationComputers typically have different BIOS configurationsInstalling on different computers is rarely the sameProblems primarily related to hardware support or configurationTypically fixed by changing hardware configuration

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems Starting the InstallationCheck BIOS boot orderCheck BIOS for reserved peripheral configurations (IRQ, I/O addresses, DMA)

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems During InstallationFor graphical installation, video card must be detected Appropriate drivers must be loadedVideo card may not be supported by mode and resolution of graphical installationUse Linux nofb or linux lowres installationMouse does not workUse text-based installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems During Installation (continued)Installation freezesDisable PnP support in BIOS prior to installationInstallation ends abnormally fatal signal 11 error displayedCould be problem with RAMOften fixed by turning off CPU cache memory or increasing number of wait states in the BIOSCould also be RAM or CPU voltage issue

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems During Installation (continued)Other failure causes include bad memory chips, an AMD K6 processor, laptop power management conflicts, overclocked CPUsOverclocked: Running a processor at a higher speed than it is rated forMay lead to increased performanceProduces more heat on processor May result in computer crashes

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems After InstallationMay have problems if installation program did not detect computer hardware properly or certain programs were not installedInstallation log file: Records actions that occur or fail during installation/root/install.log: Lists packages installed/root/install.log.syslog: Lists all system events that occurred during installation

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems After Installation (continued)To verify hardware settings, examine contents of /proc directory or boot-up log filesTo view hardware detected at boot time, use dmesg command

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems After Installation (continued)Table 7-5: Files commonly found in the /proc directory

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

  • Problems After Installation (continued)Table 7-5 (continued): Files commonly found in the /proc directory

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, 2e

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