Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification Chapter Three Linux Installation and Usage.

  • Published on
    11-Jan-2016

  • View
    213

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • ObjectivesInstall Linux Red Hat 7.2 using good practicesOutline the structure of the Linux interfaceEnter basic shell commands and find command documentationProperly shut down the Linux operating system

  • Installing LinuxInstallation methodsInstallation from an FTP server across the networkInstallation from an HTTP Web server across the networkInstallation from an NFS server across the networkInstallation from packages located on the hard disk

  • Creating Boot DisksBoot diskBootable floppy disk that can be used to start a Linux system or initiate a Linux installationRawriteWindows utility that can be used to create installation boot disks

  • Creating Boot Disksboot.imgUsed to create a floppy disk for a CD-ROM or hard disk installationbootnet.imgUsed to create a floppy disk for an installation from a server across the networkpcmcia.imgUsed to create a floppy disk for an installation on portable laptop computers

  • Starting the InstallationFigure 3-1: Beginning a Red Hat installation

  • Starting the InstallationBy far, the largest problem during installation is initiating a graphical installationFramebuffersAbstract representations of video adapter card hardware that programs may use instead of directly communicating with the video adapter card hardware

  • Choosing the Language, Keyboard, and MouseFigure 3-2: Selecting an installation language

  • Choosing the Language, Keyboard, and MouseFigure 3-3: Verifying keyboard configuration

  • Choosing the Language, Keyboard, and MouseFigure 3-4: Verifying mouse configuration

  • Choosing the Language, Keyboard, and MouseFigure 3-5: Welcome screen

  • Providing Installation OptionsFigure 3-6: Choosing installation options

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskFigure 3-7: Choosing a partitioning method

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskVirtual memoryAlso known as swap memoryConsists of an area on the hard disk that can be used to store information that would normally reside in physical memory, if the physical memory is being used excessively

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskTable 3-1: Common Linux filesystems and sizes

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskEach of the filesystems described in Table 3-1 may be of different typesThe most common types used today are:Ext2Ext3VfatREISER

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskJournaling filesystemKeeps track of the information written to the hard drive in a journalDisk DruidEasy-to-use graphical partitioning programUsing Disk Druid, you can delete existing partitions, create and edit new ones, or even create a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskFigure 3-8: Disk Druid

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskFigure 3-9: Adding a partition

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskFigure 3-10: Formatting partitions

  • Partitioning the Hard DiskFigure 3-11: The fdisk utility

  • Configuring the Boot LoaderBoot loaderProgram started by the BIOS ROM after POST, which loads the Linux kernel into memory from a hard disk partition inside the computer but can also boot other operating systems if they exist on the hard driveThere are two available boot loaders that one may choose during the Red Hat Linux installation:LInux LOader (LILO)GRand Unified Bootloader (GRUB)

  • Configuring the Boot LoaderLarge Block Addressing 32-bit (LBA32)Parameter that may be specified that enables Large Block Addressing in a boot loaderRequired only if a large hard disk that is not fully supported by the system BIOS is used

  • Configuring the Boot LoaderFigure 3-12: Configuring the boot loader

  • Configuring the Network and FirewallFigure 3-13: Configuring the network

  • Configuring the Network and FirewallFigure 3-14: Configuring a firewall

  • Choosing a System Language and Time ZoneFigure 3-15: Configuring a language support

  • Choosing a System Language and Time ZoneFigure 3-16: Selecting a time zone

  • Creating User Accounts and Configuring AuthenticationFigure 3-17: Configuring the root password

  • Creating User Accounts and Configuring AuthenticationFigure 3-18: Configuring a regular user account

  • Creating User Accounts and Configuring AuthenticationFigure 3-19: Configuring the type of authentication

  • Selecting PackagesFigure 3-20: Selecting packages to install

  • Selecting PackagesFigure 3-21: Refining individual package selection

  • Configuring the Video HardwareFigure 3-22: Verifying video hardware

  • Installing Packages and Creating Boot DisksFigure 3-23: Copying packages to the hard disk

  • Installing Packages and Creating Boot DisksFigure 3-24: Creating a boot disk

  • Selecting Monitor and X Windows SettingsFigure 3-25: Choosing a monitor

  • Selecting Monitor and X Windows SettingsFigure 3-26: Configuring X Windows

  • Selecting Monitor and X Windows SettingsFigure 3-27: Completing the installation

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelTerminalChannel that allows a certain user to log in and communicate with the kernel via a user interfaceShellUser interface that accepts input from the user and passes the input to the kernel for processingShell used by default in Linux is the BASH Shell (Bourne Again Shell)

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelFigure 3-28: Shells, terminals, and the kernel

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelFigure 3-29: The gdm (GNOME Display Manager)

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelTable 3-2: Common Linux terminals

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelFigure 3-30: A GNOME terminal

  • Shells, Terminals, and the KernelFigure 3-31: A KDE terminal

  • Basic Shell CommandsCommandsIndicate name of the program to execute and are case sensitiveOptionsSpecific letters starting with a dash - and appearing after command name to alter way the command worksArgumentsSpecify the parameters that the command works upon, which are not predetermined by the person who developed the command

  • Basic Shell CommandsTable 3-3: Some Common Linux commands

  • Shell MetacharactersMetacharactersKey combinations that have special meaning in the Linux OSOne of the most commonly used metacharacters is the $ character

  • Shell MetacharactersTable 3-4: Common BASH Shell metacharacters

  • Getting Command HelpMost distributions of Linux contain more than 1000 different Linux commands in common configurationsManual pagesCommonly referred to as man pagesThe most common set of local command syntax documentation, available by typing the man command-line utility

  • Getting Command HelpTable 3-5: Manual page section numbers

  • Getting Command HelpInfo pagesSet of local, easy-to-read command syntax documentation available by typing the info command-line utilityToday, both the info pages and the manual pages are used to find documentation because manual pages have been used to find documentation in Linux since its inception

  • Shutting Down the Linux SystemTable 3-6: Commands to halt and reboot the Linux operating system

  • Chapter SummaryMost software information can be specified at the time of installationHowever, the network configuration and package selection should be carefully planned before installationCD-ROM-based installation is the easiest, most common method for installing Linux and seldom requires the creation of an installation boot disk

  • Chapter SummaryA typical Linux installation prompts the user for information such as language, boot loader, hard disk partitions, network configuration, firewall configuration, time zone, user accounts, authentication, and package selectionUsers must log into a terminal and receive a shell before being able to interact with the Linux system and kernelRegardless of the type of terminal that you use, you are able to enter commands, options, and arguments at a shell prompt to perform system tasks, obtain help, or shut down the Linux system

Recommended

View more >