Korn Ferry Leadership ??Korn Ferry Leadership Architect™ helps individuals build comprehensive, research-based, and experience-tested ... It is the job of strategic HR and the

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  • Research guide and technical manual

    Korn FerryLeadershipArchitectGlobal competency framework

  • Korn Ferry Leadership ArchitectResearch guide and technical manual

    Korn Ferry 2014-2016. All rights reserved.

    No part of this work may be copied or transferred to any other expression or form without a license from Korn Ferry.

    For the sake of linguistic simplicity in this product, where the masculine form is used, the feminine form should always be understood to be included.

    www.kornferry.com

    Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual

    Item number 82277

    Version 14.2a 01/2016

  • Korn Ferry 20142016. All rights reserved. i

    Table of contents

    Introduction to the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual ...................... ii

    Section I Introduction to competencies and competency modeling.......................................................................... 1

    Section II Competencies that drive business strategy ....................................................................................................... 7

    Section III The foundation of the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect library ...................................................... 25

    Section IV Career Stallers and Stoppers .................................................................................................................................45

    Section V Korn Ferry Leadership Architect relationship to other constructs ..............................................................................47

    Section VI Legacy competency mappings............................................................................................................................. 58

    Section VII Frequently asked questions .................................................................................................................................. 63

    References ...................................................................................................................................................................................................69

  • Korn Ferry 20142016. All rights reserved.ii

    Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual

    Introduction to the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual

    What is the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect?

    The Korn Ferry Leadership Architect is a global competency framework that helps employees perform personal assessments of their strengths and weaknesses or the strengths and weaknesses of others. It can be used in building competency profiles, interviewing, career development, and performance reviews. The Korn Ferry Leadership Architect is also useful in HR planning, such as determining what kinds of key job experiences would be pivotal in developing managers so they can better activate the organizations strategy. In addition, the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect helps individuals build comprehensive, research-based, and experience-tested development plans on the most common development needs.

    This manual is designed primarily as a technical reference to help deepen your understanding of the research background behind the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect.

    You can refer to this technical manual for a variety of purposes:

    Build your knowledge regarding the research studies and empirical research.

    Build your knowledge regarding the research background for the Korn Ferry Leadership Architect.

    Review some key findings from our normative studies and empirical research.

    Find answers to some frequently asked questions.

    Contributors

    Guangrong Dai

    Stacy Davies

    Maynard Goff

    Jeff Jones

    Susan DMello

    J. Evelyn Orr

    Paul Storfer

    King Yii Tang

  • Korn Ferry 20142016. All rights reserved. 1

    Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual

    Section I Introduction to competencies and competency modeling

    For most organizations, the investment in human capital represents a significant proportion of all investments. This is not a foolhardy gamble. Human capital is a lever that has the potential to propel a business to a very competitive position. But, it depends on how well human capital is managed. It is the job of strategic HR and the talent management function in particular to attract, develop, and deploy the right talent for the right roles. When executive teams recognize HR as a strategic and enabling function, leveraging talent becomes a focus and a differentiator for the business.

    Study after study has found that strategic HR is more likely to have a positive impact on business success when there is alignment.

    First, the talent strategy must align to the business strategy. This means that an organizations approach to talent must enable the organizations accomplishment of its business objectives.

    Second, there must be alignment across all talent management practices. When talent management practices are integrated, the different practices and processes reinforce each other and they have a more powerful overall effect on how human capital is positioned to support the business.

    Third, how work is accomplished must be aligned, both to achieve efficiency and to facilitate effective collaboration across all levels of the organization.

    For many organizations, competencies have become the red thread that links all talent management practices together and aligns talent strategy to business strategy. Competencies provide a clear set of expectations that are aspirational in the same way a business strategy is aspirational. Competencies describe leadership skills that are general enough to prepare leaders for a dynamic business environment, one in which jobs are never the same from year to year. And competencies are the how of performance.

    The question then becomes, how can an organization use competencies to advance its business goals? That brings us to the purpose of this technical manualto explore best practices in competency modeling. Based on the collected wisdom and experience of Korn Ferry competency experts, those best practices and recommendations are presented here.

    Competencies are the skills and behaviors required for success that can be observed (Lombardo & Eichinger, 2009). Examples include Business insight, Plans and aligns, Collaborates, and Situational adaptability. Competencies enable us to make meaningful contributions that support the organization. And, because competencies shape our behavior, they determine to a large extent how we do our jobs, how we accomplish goals (Ruyle & Orr, 2011).

  • Korn Ferry 20142016. All rights reserved.2

    Korn Ferry Leadership Architect Research guide and technical manual

    Historical perspective on competencies and competency modeling

    The history of competency modeling can be traced back to the work of psychologist David McClelland. In the article Testing for Competence Rather Than Intelligence, McClelland (1973) argued that assessment tools such as intelligence tests predict academic performance more than success on the job. Instead of testing for traits related to intelligence that are far removed from practical outcomes, McClelland suggested that the best test for selection and employment purposes would be one that assesses real job skills.

    Shortly after this article was published, job analysis techniques and assessment centers were increasingly implemented in organizations. The objective of job analysis is to identify work activities involved in a job and specify what is required of the worker. Assessment centers evaluate job candidates on these worker requirements through techniques such as work simulations, in-basket exercises, and leaderless group discussions. During the 1970s, things began to change when the results of assessment centers began to influence the field (Bray, Campbell, & Grant, 1974). Practitioners and researchers discovered that many organizations using assessment centers were assessing roughly the same skills. They found substantial overlap across the skill sets for different jobs in different organizations. It became clear that a common set of competencies could specify the job requirements for a wide range of jobs across industries (Thornton & Byham, 1982).

    These findings from assessment centers spurred the competency modeling movement during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Competency modeling had made enough of an inroad that in 1997, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology commissioned a task force to investigate and review the practice of competency modeling (Schippmann et al., 2000). The task force identified some key benefits of competency modeling over traditional job-analysis techniques.

    Schippmann et al. (2000) found that competency modeling and competencies (a) establish a link between roles and business goals and strategies, (b) serve as a platform for training and development applications, (c) emphasize long-term organizational fit versus short-term job match, (d) capture value and personality orientations that are not typically seen in job analysis, and (e) enhance face validity through the language and spirit that is important to the organizations. Despite the identified benefits, some experts involved in this study were skeptical about the viability of competency modeling and expected it to die quickly.

    To the contrary! Competency modeling has continued to gain popularity during the past decade. This popularity was probably aided by the shift in the nature of workfrom routinized tasks and activities to knowledge-based work. Competencies made it easier to observe and measure the quality of work output.