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Distributor Training Program HVAC/Indoor Air Quality

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Page 1: HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Distributor Training Programassets.fluke.com/FACT/HVACIndoorAirQuality.pdf · and outdoor air pollution. The relative importance of any single source ... maintenance

Distributor Training Program

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality

Page 2: HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Distributor Training Programassets.fluke.com/FACT/HVACIndoorAirQuality.pdf · and outdoor air pollution. The relative importance of any single source ... maintenance

Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

Indoor Air Quality

Product Knowledge

It’s been a problem for tens of thousands of years. Maybe it’s time to fix it. From the Padahlin caves in Myan-mar to New Mexico’s Tsankawi Mesa pueblos, ancient human dwellings are stained with soot from cooking fires. Paleolithic people had problems with air quality indoors before they even had doors.

Fast forward to the twenty-first century. We’ve quit barbecuing cave bear in the living room, but indoor air quality (IAQ) is still an issue. Problems appeared to increase after the �970s energy crisis, when architects and owners redesigned HVAC systems, adjusted operations and sealed buildings more effec-tively in an effort to conserve energy.

The term “sick building syndrome” (SBS) describes situations when building occu-pants experience health and comfort effects that appear to be linked to time spent in a building, but no specific illness or cause can be found. Professionals use the term “build-ing related illness” (BRI) when symptoms of diagnosable illness can be attributed directly to airborne building contaminants.

The effectsHealth effects from indoor air pollutants may be experienced soon after exposure or, possi-bly, years later.

Immediate effects include irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, headaches, dizzi-ness, and fatigue. Such immediate effects are usually short-term and treatable. Some-times the treatment is simply eliminating the person’s exposure to the source of the pollu-tion, if it can be identified.

Certain immediate effects are similar to those from colds or other viral diseases, so it’s often difficult to determine if the symptoms are a result of exposure to indoor air pollution. For this reason, it’s important to pay attention to the time and place symptoms occur. If the symptoms fade or go away when a person is away from home, for example, an effort should be made to identify home indoor air sources that may be possible causes. Some effects

may be made worse by an inadequate supply of outdoor air or from the heating, cooling, or humidity conditions prevalent in the home.

What do we mean by indoor air quality?Humidity and temperature are important comfort factors, and failure to manage them can create other problems — allowing the growth of mold, or turning chillers into biol-ogy experiments.

Common indoor air pollutants include tobacco smoke; biological agents like animal dander, bacteria and mold; airborne particu-lates; volatile organic compounds like glue, solvents, cleaning agents; carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide; and pesticides.

Many of these materials are found in minute amounts in most indoor environments. When concentrations or combinations of pollutants rise excessively, however, IAQ deteriorates. IAQ problems can result from a host of factors.

What Causes Indoor Air Problems?Indoor pollution sources that release gases or particles into the air are the primary cause of indoor air quality problems in homes. Inad-equate ventilation can increase indoor pollut-ant levels by not bringing in enough outdoor air to dilute emissions from indoor sources and by not carrying indoor air pollutants out of the home. High temperature and humid-ity levels can also increase concentrations of some pollutants.

Pollutant Sources

Product KnowledgeIndoor Air Quality

What you will learn in this module:

• What are the origins of indoor air quality problems?

• How can one evaluate an indoor environment?

• What steps can be taken to improve indoor air quality?

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Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

Indoor Air Quality

Product Knowledge

There are many sources of indoor air pollu-tion in any home. These include combustion sources such as oil, gas, kerosene, coal, wood, and tobacco products; building materials and furnishings as diverse as deteriorated, asbestos-containing insulation, wet or damp carpet, and cabinetry or furniture made of certain pressed wood products; products for household cleaning and maintenance, personal care, or hobbies; central heating and cooling systems and humidification devices; and outdoor sources such as radon, pesticides, and outdoor air pollution.

The relative importance of any single source depends on how much of a given pollutant it emits and how hazardous those emissions are. In some cases, factors such as how old the source is and whether it is properly main-tained are significant. For example, an improperly adjusted gas stove can emit significantly more carbon monoxide than one that is properly adjusted.

Some sources, such as building materials, furnishings, and household products like air fresheners, release pollutants more or less continuously. Other sources, related to activities carried out in the home, release pollutants intermittently. These include smoking, the use of unvented or malfunctioning stoves, furnaces, or space heaters, the use of solvents in cleaning and hobby activities, the use of paint strippers in redecorating activities, and the use of cleaning products and pesticides in house-keeping. High pollutant concentra-tions can remain in the air for long periods after some of these activities.

Amount of VentilationIf too little outdoor air enters a home, pollutants can accumulate to levels that can pose health and comfort problems. Unless they are built with special mechanical means of ventilation, homes that are designed and constructed to minimize the amount of outdoor air that can “leak” into and out of the home may have higher pollutant levels than other homes. However, because some weather conditions can drastically reduce the amount of outdoor air that enters a home, pollutants can build up even in homes that are normally considered “leaky”.

How Does Outdoor Air Enter a House?Outdoor air enters and leaves a house by:

infiltration, natural ventilation, and mechani-cal ventilation. In a process known as infiltra-tion, outdoor air flows into the house through openings, joints, and cracks in walls, floors, and ceilings, and around windows and doors. In natural ventilation, air moves through opened windows and doors. Air movement associated with infiltration and natural venti-lation is caused by air temperature differences between indoors and outdoors and by wind. Finally, there are a number of mechanical ventilation devices, from outdoor-vented fans that intermittently remove air from a single room, such as bathrooms and kitchen, to air handling systems that use fans and duct

work to continuously remove indoor air and distribute filtered and conditioned outdoor air to strategic points throughout the house. The rate at which outdoor air replaces indoor air is described as the air exchange rate. When there is little infiltration, natural ventilation, or mechanical ventilation, the air exchange rate is low and pollutant levels can increase.

Keys to IAQ: design, operation and maintenance of HVAC systemsPoor design of buildings and HVAC systems is one cause. An air intake located above a load-ing dock, for instance, could draw in vehicle exhaust and distribute carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and diesel soot to every

INDOORS

ROOM(S)

OU

TDO

ORS

TEMPERATURE SENSOR

AIR CONTROL DAMPER

CENTRAL AIR HANDLING UNIT

UNIT VENTILATOR

AIR FILTER(S)DRAIN PAN

COOLING COILHEATING COIL

BLOWER

RETURN AIR STAT

MIXED AIR STAT

FREEZE STAT

RETURNDAMPER

OUTDOOR AIR DAMPER

EXHAUSTDAMPER

EXHAUST AIR

OUTDOOR AIR

RESET ORECONOMIZER STAT

MIXED AIR

RETURN AIRSUPPLY AIR

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Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

Indoor Air Quality

Product Knowledge

cubicle. Systems without sufficient fresh air exchange can allow CO� and volatile organic compounds to build up. The wrong construc-tion materials can emit excessive chemicals from glue and paint.

Another big factor is system operation. Air pressure, temperature, humidity and operat-ing cycles must all be properly adjusted to balance operating efficiency with the comfort of building occupants. Leaving systems off until occupants arrive in the morning might save money, for instance, but allow pollutants to build up in the air. Better to start systems early and condition the air before people show up. Leaving doors or windows open between office space and a shop floor could virtually guarantee IAQ problems.

The third big IAQ determinant is system maintenance. Even the best building and HVAC design won’t deliver the results it should if electrical systems or vents fail, filters aren’t frequently changed or correctly installed, fan and compressor motors malfunc-tion or controls fail to perform.

Evaluating relative humidity: Key factors and measurementsUnderstanding the relationship between dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, relative humidity, and dew point temperature is essential in all facets of air conditioning.

The good news, strangely enough, is that poor humidity and temperature levels are likely to cause occupant discomfort.

Dry bulb temperature: Air temperature determined by an ordinary thermometer.

Wet bulb temperature: Represents the cooling effect of evaporating water, the temperature air will cool to when water evaporates into unsaturated air.

Relative humidity: Ratio of water vapor pressure (amount currently in the air) to the saturation vapor pressure (the amount the air can hold) at a given air temperature.

Dewpoint temperature: The temperature under which water will condense out of the air.

FungusConditions for fungal growth include spores settling on a surface, a micro-environment ensuring oxygen, optimal temperatures, nutri-ents, and moisture. Four of these conditions are found in nearly every environment. The most controllable variant is moisture.

Relative humidity above 60% can support

fungal growth on hygroscopic surfaces, ones that readily take up and retain mois-ture. Nearly all surfaces are, or can become, hygroscopic and include painted surfaces, gypsum dry wall, carpets, wall coverings, and masonry products. Even glass with a dirt film and dust on it can support fungal growth.

Masonry products such as brick, cinder block and concrete are excellent sorbents and can absorb vast quantities of moisture and become an inviting breeding environment for molds.

CondensationConditions that allow condensation to form on surfaces are more obvious, so action can be taken immediately. When a surface tempera-ture is at or below the dew point temperature, condensation will form. Likely places for this to occur are on basement surfaces, crawlspace surfaces, cold water pipes, on air handling equipment and duct work, and unseen within envelope walls.

In cooling systems, relative humidity in supply ducts can be 95 % or higher, and evaporators and condensate pans will be wet. So, since moisture control is not feasible, control of airborne spores and food (dust and airborne particles) with good, tight fitting filtration systems in place is essential to control fungus growth.

Chapter Summary

Origins of indoor air quality problems

• (SBS) Sick Building Syndrome — building occupants experience health and comfort effects, but no specific cause is found

• Effects can be irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, headaches, dizziness and fatigue

• Common indoor air pollutants include tobacco smoke; biological agents like animal dander, bacteria and mold; airborne particulates; volatile organic componds like glue, solvents, cleaning agents and carbon monoxide

Ventilation

• If too little outdoor air enters a home, pollut-ants can accumulate to levels that can pose health and comfort problems

• Outdoor air enters and leaves a house by infiltration, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation

Design, operation and maintenance of HVAC systems

• Poor design of buildings — an air intake above a loading dock, systems without fresh air exchange, wrong construction materials

• System operation — don’t leave systems off until occupants arrive in the morning, other-wise pollutants will build up in the air, and open windows between office space and the shop floor can generate air quality problems

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Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

Indoor Air Quality

Product Knowledge

Fluke.Keeping your world up and running.

Chapter Summary (continued)

• Maintenance — if electrical systems or vents fail, filters aren’t frequently changed or correctly installed, fan and compressor motors malfunction or controls fail to perform, systems will not scrub the air efficiently or correctly

Relative Humidity

• Dry bulb temperature — air temperature determined by an ordinary thermometer • Wet bulb temperature — represents the cooling effect of evaporating water • Relative humidity — Ratio of the water currently in the air to the amount the air can hold,

at a given temperature • Dew point temperature — The temperature under which water will condense out of the air

Fungus

• Relative humidity above 60% can support fungal growth on surfaces that readily take up and retain moisture

• Masonry products such as brick, cinder block and concrete can absorb vast quantities of moisture and become an inviting breeding environment for molds

Condensation

• When a surface temperature is at or below the dew point temperature, condensation will form.

Test your knowledge

Fluke Corporation PO Box 9090, Everett, WA USA 98�06

For more information call: In the U.S.A. (800) ���-585� or Fax (��5) ��6-5��6 In Canada (800)-�6-FLUKE or Fax (905) 890-6866 Web access: http://www.fluke.com

©�009 Fluke Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. Phase �, Module 7, Rev �

1. Outdoor air enters and leaves a house by:

A. infiltration

B. natural ventilation

C. mechanical ventilation

D. All of the above

2. It’s a good idea to leave HVAC systems off until occupants arrive in the morning.

A. True B. False

3. When a surface temperature is at or below the _________ temperature, condensation will form.

A. wet bulb

B. dry bulb

C. dew point

D. ambient

4. _________ above 60% can support fungal growth on surfaces that readily take up and retain moisture.

A. Heat levels

B. Relative humidity

C. Surface grades

D. All of the above

1. D 2. B 3. C 4. B

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Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

Dirty coils, fans, and filters increase static pressure by reducing airflow, causing HVAC equipment to work harder to meet occupant loads thus increasing energy costs. With HVAC energy costs often comprising over 50% of the total energy bill, tighter monitoring and control of HVAC airflow can have a direct impact on the bottom line.

How HVAC airflow impacts operating costs• In a study� on coil cleaning and energy savings in a New York City high rise, pres-sure monitoring and visual inspection led to restoration of the coils and components. The restoration resulted in a �4% decrease in pressure drop across the coils, a 25% increase in the coil’s thermal efficiency, and energy savings of up to $40,000 in the first year.• EPA studies2 show that a �5 cfm airflow differential can impact annual HVAC energy costs by up to 8 % depending upon the HVAC system and variations in climate.

Air quality test instruments must deliver accurate and verifiable performance, both to ensure precise and reliable air quality diagno-sis, and to provide credible answers if results or procedures are challenged. The air qual-ity professional’s reputation depends on the quality and performance of the test tools in� Baker, Robert G.; Montgomery, Ross D. “Coil Cleaning and its Resultant Energy Savings and Maintenance Enhancements.” Indoor Air Quality Conference Proceedings, 2006:22-27.2 “Energy Cost and IAQ Performance of Ventilation Systems and Controls, Project Report #4.” United States Environmental Protection Agency, January 2000:�0.

use, as well as on their understanding of instrument specifications, technologies, applications and maintenance.

ProductsAir velocity is a key parameter in evaluatingairflow system performance. As part of basictesting, adjusting and balancing of HVAC air distribution systems, technicians measure airvelocity at grilles/ registers/diffusers within a duct or in open space.

Fluke 975 AirMeter™Five powerful tools in one, with simple one-touch air velocity allowing your customer to optimize HVAC systems which manage energy costsThe Fluke 975 test tool combines five powerful air quality tools into one, pack-aged as a rugged and easy-to-use handheld device. Use the Fluke 975 to optimize HVAC ventilation settings for ASHRAE 62 recom-mendations, actively monitor conditions that promote a productive environment, and quickly and accurately address occupant comfort complaints the first time. The Fluke 975 measures and simultaneously displays temperature, humidity, CO2 and CO, and at the press of a button it quickly measures air flow velocity and percentage of outside air.

Use the Fluke 975 AirMeter test tool to: • Respond to comfort-related calls from occupants• Verify the operation of building HVAC control

systems• Determine whether adequate ventilation exists

Product KnowledgeHVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

What you will learn in this module:

• How HVAC airflow impacts operating costs

• Products• Features and Benefits• Airborne particle

detection• Why particle counts

matter• What is carbon

monoxide (CO)?• Why true-rms matters

for HVAC technicians

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Page 2 Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

• Monitor air flow and velocity• Test for dangerous carbon monoxide leaks• Perform duct traversals• Wet bulb and dew point temperature• % of outside air calculation• CO2 and CO field calibration feature• Automatically compensates for barometric

pressure changes• Min/Max/Average on all measured and

calculated readings• Audible and visual threshold alarms• Extensive discrete or continuous data

logging capacity, downloadable to PC via USB interface

Fluke 922 Airflow Meter

The way to measure airflow, easily.Today’s HVAC technicians want a simple solu-tion for diagnosing ventilation issues. Differ-ential pressure measurements only tell part of the story. Technicians also want to measure air velocity and flow, without having to resort to expensive, difficult to use, specialist tools. The Fluke 922 makes airflow measurements easy by combining three tools: differential pressure, airflow, and velocity into a single, rugged meter.

Fluke 922 was designed and built for how (and where) your customer does their job. The bright white display and ruggedized holster with a wrist strap let them take the instrument into less than ideal environments. Specially designed color-coded hoses help keep track of where the readings are coming from.

Used with any pitot tube, the Fluke 922 is the perfect entry point for technicians

measuring air flow for the first time, yet powerful enough for advanced users. This powerful meter provides differential and static pressure, air velocity and flow readings to measure pressure drops across key HVAC equipment which drive peak performance to extend equipment life.• Monitor indoor vs. outdoor pressure relation-

ships and manage the building envelope • Promote indoor comfort and quality • Perform duct traversals for accurate airflow

readings • Match ventilation to occupant loads• User-defined duct shape and size for maxi-

mum airflow accuracy• Convenient colored hoses help proper

interpretation of pressure readings and easy connection

• Bright, backlit display for clear viewing in all environments

• Resolution down to 0.00� in H2O • 99 point data storage capacity • Min/Max/Average/Hold functions for easy

data analysis

Did you know?Studies indicate that productivity can increase anywhere from 0.5% to 5% given a comfortable work environment. Fluke has products designed to monitor and maintain a comfortable indoor air environment.

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Page � Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

Fluke 971 Temperature Humidity MeterTemperature and humidity are two impor-tant factors in maintaining optimal comfort levels and good indoor air quality. Quickly and conveniently take accurate humidity and temperature readings with the Fluke 97�, an instrument that will prove invaluable for facility maintenance and utility technicians, HVAC-service contractors, and specialists who assess indoor air quality (IAQ). Lightweight and easy to hold, the Fluke 97� is the perfect tool for monitoring problem areas. With a rugged holster and twist-open protective sensor cover, the Fluke 97� is built to perform and made to last. • Backlit dual display of humidity and

temperature, measures dew point and wet bulb temperatures

• Quick-response capacitance sensor with twist-open protective cover

• Compact and lightweight at �88 g (6.6 oz)• Temperature range from -20 °C to 60 °C (-4 °F

to �40 °F)• Relative humidity from 5% to 95%

Duct temperaturesUse the Fluke 97� and an infrared thermome-ter to monitor duct temperatures at the regis-ter. Easily calculate dewpoint with the Fluke 97�, then compare it to register temperatures to see if they fall below the dewpoint. Use an infrared thermometer in this application as a

general indicator only. Many factors come into play when taking IR measurments, such as emissivity and spot-to-distance ratio. Lower temperatures can lead to condensation form-ing on ductwork. If uninsulated, moisture can fall onto ceiling materials and cause potential mold issues and water damage.

Airborne particle detectionOver the past several years, indoor air quality (IAQ) has been a much debated and publicizedtopic, especially as it concerns public health. The EPA estimates that we spend approxi-mately 90% of our time indoors, and further studies indicate that indoor air in some commercial settings is up to five times morepolluted than outdoor air. Airborne particu-lates come in a variety of forms ranging fromanimal dander, plant pollen, and airborne bacteria, to fiberglass, asbestos, and combus-tion particles. Motionless, human beings alone shed up to 500,000 particles (0.�μm) per minute. When active, this level can reach up to 45,000,000 particles per minute. Humidity and temperature play a significant role in the generation rate of these pollutants. To properly identify and troubleshoot IAQ problems, the technician needs a tool that not only reads particle concentrations, but also provides insight into the environment that causes pollutants to grow.

Why particle counts matterDifferent locations have varying levels of acceptable particulate concentrations, driven primarily by health and comfort concerns(i.e. homes, offices, paint booths) or contami-nation (i.e. hospitals, food and beverage plants, cleanrooms). Excessive levels canresult in medical conditions such as Sick Building Syndrome, lower productivity, contaminated product, or all of the above.

Maintaining acceptable air quality levels may not only lower the costs associated with downtime, but also reduce or remove costs associated with expensive fixes in the future. The first step in establishing an IAQ mainte-nance program is to determine if a problem currently exists.

Fluke 983 Particle CounterThis tool is a portable solution for determining airborne particle concentra-tions. Use the Fluke 98� to immediately respond to occupant complaints, or as part of a comprehensive preventive maintenance program.

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Page 4 Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

With the Fluke 983, you can: • Measure filter efficiency • Monitor industrial cleanrooms • Pre-screen indoor air quality and confidently

work with IAQ specialists • Locate particle sources for remediation • Report the effectiveness of repairs to

customers • Drive additional business by demonstrating

the need for maintenance and repair With expanded data logging and six-channel particle size display, the Fluke 98� allows users to run more tests quickly, with less time spent cycling through screens to obtain the data. The Fluke 98� is lightweight and easy to use in any position, with a comfortable hand strap and rugged rubber holster.

This instrument holds 5000 logged samples including date, time, counts, sample volume, temperature and relative humidity. Data is easily downloaded using the included windows compatible utility software.

• Graphic liquid crystal display with backlight• Simple connection to computer or printer• Selectable sample time, count data and

programmable delay• Set sample size to cubic feet or liters, set

temperature measurements to °C or °F • Data displayed in totalize or concentration

modes• Battery or ac operation with internal

rechargeable battery

Every year, over 200 people in the United States die from CO produced by fuel-burning appliances (furnaces, ranges, water heaters, room heaters). Others die from CO produced while burning charcoal inside a home, garage, vehicle or tent. Still others die from CO produced by cars left running in attached garages. Several thousand people go to hospital emergency rooms for treatment for CO poisoning.

What is carbon monoxide (CO)?Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas with potentially serious healthconsequences given adequate exposure.CO levels Exposure symptoms

70 to �00 ppm Mild headaches Sore eyes Runny nose Mild nausea Shortness of breath

�50 to �00 ppm Dizziness Headaches Drowsiness Vomiting

400 and higher ppm Unconsciousness Brain damage Death

Treatment optionsGet victim to fresh air immediately. If you can’t get victim out of the building open all windows and doors.

Take victim to a hospital emergency room for a carbon monoxide blood test.

CO-220 Carbon Monoxide MeterQuickly and accurately measure CO levels with this easy-to-use compact meter

Featuring the newest generation of electrochemical sensors, the CO-220 responds very quickly to ambient changes in carbon monoxide concen-tration without the use of a pump.

The CO-220 is the perfect instru-ment for technicians and other professionals who need to measure CO levels within spaces such as industrial environments, commercial buildings, or residential dwellings where accumulation of combustion gas is possible. • Standalone CO meter that does not

require a digital multimeter• Bright back-light allows easy screen viewing

under dim lighting conditions• CO levels from 0 to �000 ppm

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Page 5 Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

• Beeper triggers with increasing frequency as CO levels rise

• MAX hold function stores and displays the maxi-mum CO level

• Automatic sensor zeroing and self-test upon startup

Why true-rms matters for HVAC techniciansNon-linear loads need a true-rms test tool for accurate readings For today’s HVAC technician, troubleshooting electrical problems is becom-ing more difficult without the use of true-rms test tools. This is due in part to the prolifera-tion of new solid state adjustable speed motor drives and heating controls containing power semiconductors or rectifiers. These loads are referred to as “non-linear.” Non-linear loads draw current in short pulses rather than the smooth sine wave drawn by a linear load such as an induction motor. The current wave shape can have a drastic effect on a test tool reading.

Fluke 902 True-rms HVAC Clamp Meter

Heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) technicians require a service tool that can consistently keep up with their demands, one designed for the systems they service and install daily. With True RMS technology and a CAT III 600V rating, HVAC technicians can troubleshoot and maintain HVAC equipment safely and with confidence in the results.

Use the Fluke 902 to get more done: • Capture flue gas temperatures • Conduct flame rod testing • Measure start and run motor capacitors • Measure supply side current and voltage as

well as load side current and voltage • Measure current and voltage phase balance

on � phase systems • Troubleshoot compressor electrical motor

faults • Measure performance of variable frequency

drives

Features: • Designed for HVAC applications with capaci-

tance, DC Current (μA), and temperature measurements

• Small body and jaws fit perfectly in your hand and into tight places

• Handy ‘Display Hold’ button keeps measure-ments on the display

• Meter controls are positioned so current measurements can be done with one hand (index finger on clamp opening lever and thumb on rotary switch)

• Large, backlit display is easy-to-see in less than ideal conditions

• Auto shut-off maximizes battery life so the meter works when you need it

• Three year warranty

Fluke 561 HVACProMultipurpose thermometer for heating, ventilation, air conditioning & refrigeration inspections

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Page 6 Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

The Fluke 56� HVACPro provides both non-contact and contact temperature measure-ments, replacing several other test tools. It is fast, efficient and easy to use, saving your customer valuable time and effort.

Use the infrared (IR) thermometer to measure hot, moving, electrically energized and hard-to-reach objects instantly. Check motors, insulation, breakers, radiant heat-ing, pipes, corroded connections and wires plus scan ducts in the ceiling from the floor without a ladder.

Compare contact measurments with IR, a handy velcro pipe probe is included for superheat and sub-cooling contact measure-ments. Your customer can also plug in their own industry-standard K-type thermocouple probes to obtain other contact measurment comparisons.

• IR thermometer for quick measurements up close or at a distance, without a ladder

• Compatible with all standard mini-connector K-type thermocouples

• Velcro pipe probe for superheat, sub-cooling or other contact and ambient measurements

• Single-point laser sighting • Temperature range optimized for HVAC/R

applications • Easy emissivity adjustment for measuring

pipes and ducts more accurately • Lightweight (only �40 grams (�2 ounces))

and portable • Very easy to use • Efficient – no need to shut down equipment

when making IR measurements • MIN, MAX and DIF temperature readings

help you quickly identify problems • Scan large areas or small objects quickly and

efficiently • HVAC/R measurement guide included to

maximize your productivity

Laser-guided sighting for IR measurements In the IR mode, you can take temperatures within two meters of the target and scan ducts from further away without a ladder. The laser sighting system guides measurements. The single laser dot indicates the approxi-mate center of the measurement area. The measured area becomes larger with distance.

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Page 7 Fluke Corporation FACT – Product Knowledge

HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Tools

Product Knowledge

Fluke.Keeping your world up and running.

Chapter Summary

The product family • Fluke 975 AirMeter™ - measures and simultaneously displays temperature, humidity, CO2 and CO, and

at the press of a button it quickly measures air flow velocity and percentage of outside air. • Fluke 922 Airflow Meter - differential pressure, airflow, and velocity into a single, rugged meter. • Fluke 971 Temperature Humidity Meter - Quickly and conveniently take accurate humidity and

temperature readings. • Fluke 983 Particle Counter - portable solution for determining airborne particle concentrations. • CO-220 Carbon Monoxide Meter - Standalone CO meter that does not require a digital multimeter. • Fluke 902 True-rms HVAC Clamp Meter - Capture flue gas temperatures, conduct flame rod testing,

measure supply side current and voltage as well as load side current and voltage and measure start and run motor capacitors with one tool.

• Fluke 561 HVACPro - provides both non-contact and contact temperature measurements, replacing several other test tools.

Test your knowledge

FlukeCorporation PO Box 9090, Everett, WA USA 98206

Formoreinformationcall: In the U.S.A. (800) 44�-585� or Fax (425) 446-5��6 In Canada (800)-�6-FLUKE or Fax (905) 890-6866 Web access: http://www.fluke.com

©2009 Fluke Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. Phase �, Module �0, Rev 2

1.HVACenergycostsoftencompriseover_________ofthetotalenergybill.

A.10%

B.25%

C.35%

D.50%

2.TheFluke975measuresandsimultaneouslydisplays____________________________________.

A.temperatureandhumidity

B.CO2andCO

C.airflowvelocityandpercentageofoutsideair

D.alloftheabove

3.WiththeFluke983,youcan________________________________________.

A.measurefilterefficiency

B.monitorindustrialclassrooms

C.locateparticlesourcesforremediation

D.alloftheabove

4.TheFluke_____________providesbothnon-contactandcontacttemperaturemeasurments.

A.975

B.561HVACPro

C.902

D.971

1.D2.D3.D4.B

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Fluke Corporation PO Box 9090, Everett, WA USA 98206

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For more information call: In the U.S.A. (800) 443-5853 or Fax (425) 446-5116 In Europe/M-East/Africa +31 (0) 40 2675 200 or Fax +31 (0) 40 2675 222 In Canada (800)-36-FLUKE or Fax (905) 890-6866 From other countries +1 (425) 446-5500 or Fax +1 (425) 446-5116 Web access: http://www.fluke.com

©2009 Fluke Corporation. Specifications subject to change without notice. Printed in U.S.A 1/2009 FACT Distributor Training Program C-EN-N Rev A

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