Hiring Myths - OutMatch Hiring Myths Myths, Misconceptions and Maladies of the Hiring Process Most company

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  • Hiring Myths Myths, Misconceptions and Maladies of the Hiring Process

    Most company executives believe they have an effective hiring process in place and are prepared for any hiring dilemma.

    In reality, many ineffective hiring practices are currently in use at organizations across the globe. Business leaders and HR personnel are likely buying into the many myths that surround the crucial task of hiring employees, and whether they are aware of it or not, these deficient practices are likely hurting their bottom line.

    Combating or avoiding hiring problems begins with identifying the myths and then prescribing effective talent management solutions. You must first find out which myths you believe, how much these misconceptions are costing your company, and how you can help relieve this malady before it becomes terminal. This paper will assist you in solving these common hiring dilemmas when creating your Dream Team.

    4455 Carver Woods Dr., Suite 100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 www.devinegroup.com S Sandler Training (with design) is a registered

    service mark of Sandler Training, Inc.

  • 1. Companies believe they have a defined hiring process.

    2. Companies believe they have realistic expectations of the time it takes to recruit, interview and hire top talent.

    3. Companies believe that when a new employee isn’t performing, they will terminate that employee quickly.

    THE TRUTH IS:

    1. What many companies consider a ‘defined hiring process’ may consist of having a place to post job listings, an employee to gather resumes, and a manager to conduct the interviews. Truly defining the hiring process, however, means investing time, energy and resources into researching and choosing a proven, multi-faceted method for conducting the search, and tracking job positions and candidates. There are many HR-related software tracking pack-ages that can help with this endeavor.

    2. Companies rarely take a retrospective look at how long it actually took to secure top talent. The authors of Topgrading: How to Hire, Coach and Keep

    “A” Players strongly recommend that companies try to fill every position with A players. Yet most companies continue to hire B’s and C’s—thus never raising their talent bar. One reason for this is that some leaders believe it should only take 30 to 45 days to hire the right person. The reality is it can take much longer than that to find the right person. Rushing the process will not lead to long-term success.

    3. Firing an employee is rarely a fast or simple procedure. Most companies actually spend two to eight times longer firing an employee than they spent hiring the person in the first place.

    Companies rarely take a retrospective look at how long it actually took to secure top talent.

    Hiring Myths

    THE THREE BASIC HIRING MYTHS ARE:

    4455 Carver Woods Dr., Suite 100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 www.devinegroup.com S Sandler Training (with design) is a registered

    service mark of Sandler Training, Inc.

  • Some managers will give themselves the proverbial high- five when an onslaught of applicants apply for a position— even though the applicants are unqualified.

    Sourcing Myths

    A second group of myths deal with sourcing—or where and how to find can- didates. It is imperative to have a realistic and accurate idea of the right place and means of locating and identifying top talent.

    THE MOST COMMON SOURCING MYTHS ARE:

    1. Companies believe the job posting needs to “sell” the position and the company.

    2. Companies believe that the more applicants who respond to a job opening, the better.

    THE TRUTH IS:

    1. Some companies routinely post job advertisements that sound too good to be true. (i.e., come work for a fun, exciting, growth-oriented company! Earn great money for doing very little! All you need is enthusiasm and energy!) That’s a bit of an exaggeration, but you get the idea. This is not the way to find serious, committed and loyal employees.

    2. Even using a toned-down version of the above type of ad, it is no wonder the wrong people show up—in droves. And some managers will give them- selves the proverbial high-five when an onslaught of applicants apply—even though the applicants are unqualified.

    The biggest problem with this scenario? It costs money to process unqualified applicants.

    These types of job postings don’t describe the job or the company, and the unqualified responders are too numerous to count. It is much more effective for companies to provide a basic, honest description of both the job and the company in the ad and ask for interested candidates who meet certain basic requirements. Having interested candidates take a basic online assessment up front can also filter unqualified applicants.

    4455 Carver Woods Dr., Suite 100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 www.devinegroup.com S Sandler Training (with design) is a registered

    service mark of Sandler Training, Inc.

  • Interviewing Myths

    THE THREE BASIC INTERVIEWING MYTHS ARE:

    1. Companies believe they have an objective, unbiased interviewing process.

    2. Companies believe they interview the candidate impartially, and don’t focus on his or her personality.

    3. Companies believe that performance-on-the-interview indicates perfor- mance on the job.

    If these three myths were true, hiring managers could follow this plan and hire top talent and reduce turnover, therefore mitigating some of the costs associated with it. Unfortunately, most interviewers fall prey to the urge to size up a candidate by relying on their gut instinct—and then selling the job to them.

    THE TRUTH IS:

    1. They don’t have an objective, repeatable, scalable, and assessable inter- viewing process. In addition to investing in structured behavioral interview training, assessments can help you figure out a person’s true strengths and weaknesses. It is one of the few tools in the process that is completely objective and quantitative. When given early enough, assessments can also uncover information that the interviewer can use during the interview.

    2. Many hiring managers have tremendous difficulty separating the candi- date’s personality from his or her qualifications. They may spend too much time bonding with an amiable candidate, and then ask very few job-pertinent questions. Worse, and this is most often the case, the interviewer spends 80 percent of the time talking instead of listening, thus gleaning little informa- tion from the candidate.

    3. The final mistake in interviewing is to believe a candidate’s performance in an interview mirrors his or her performance on the job. Candidates will be on their best behavior during an interview and will undoubtedly tell a hiring manager exactly what they want to hear. This is quite similar to going on a first date. It isn’t until the third or fourth date when you begin to meet the real person you are dating. The same can be said for interviewing. Unfortu- nately, many hiring managers are fooled by a one-hour schmooze-fest and end up hiring the wrong person because they like the candidate… and they don’t like interviewing. In their minds, the quicker the job is filled, the better.

    Many hiring managers have tremendous difficulty separating the candidate’s personality from his or her qualifications.

    4455 Carver Woods Dr., Suite 100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 www.devinegroup.com S Sandler Training (with design) is a registered

    service mark of Sandler Training, Inc.

  • Candidates sometimes stretch the truth when providing references as they believe most companies don’t check references—and unfortunately, they are correct.

    Verification Myths

    THE BASIC VERIFICATION MYTHS ARE:

    1. The resume is always an honest portrayal of the candidate’s experience.

    2. Background/reference checks provide little value.

    THE TRUTH IS:

    1. Major mistakes are often made when validating a candidate’s information. The first rule when looking at a resume is: don’t believe everything you read. In other words, many resumes are great works of fiction—not fact. Either that, or they are spun in a way to create the illusion that a candidate has achieved results, when in fact that is only a partial truth.

    For example, a candidate may write the following on his resume: “Grew ter- ritory from $1,000,000 to $12,000,000 in four years.” Sounds impressive. What this candidate isn’t saying is he was given a $9,000,000 house account to manage that wasn’t initially in his territory. Technically, he still increased revenue in his territory, but the missing details show that this salesman isn’t the superhero his resume is depicting.

    2. Candidates also sometimes stretch the truth when providing references. They believe most companies don’t check references—and unfortunately, they are correct. Those who do check references have quite a few interesting stories to share—instances where high-level executives put down names of people who turned out to be neighbors or golfing partners with strong titles rather than business references who actually worked with the candidate.

    Candidates may also misrepresent their degrees, training or certifications— and they get away with it because these things are often not verified.

    4455 Carver Woods Dr., Suite 100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 www.devinegroup.com S Sandler Training (with design) is a registered

    service mark of Sandler Training, Inc.

  • How your company could be sacrificing a million dollars:

    The Co