Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke

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Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke. The Center for Life Enrichment Quality Assurance 2013. Section 1. Heat Exhaustion. Heat Exhaustion. Heat exhaustion is a heat-related illness that can occur after you’ve been exposed to high temperatures for a period of time and have become dehydrated - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke

Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke

Heat Exhaustion & HeatstrokeThe Center for Life EnrichmentQuality Assurance 2013

Heat ExhaustionSection 1Heat exhaustion is a heat-related illness that can occur after youve been exposed to high temperatures for a period of time and have become dehydratedHeat exhaustion is one of three heat-related syndromes, with heat cramps being the mildest and heatstroke being the most severe

Heat ExhaustionCauses of heat exhaustion include exposure to high temperatures, particularly when combined with high humidity and strenuous physical activityWithout prompt treatment, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke, a life-threatening conditionHeat exhaustion and heatstroke are preventable!Causes of Heat-Related IllnessesHeat exhaustion is strongly related to the heat indexThe risk of heat-related illness dramatically increases when the heat index climbs to 91 F or higherIts extremely important, especially during heat waves, to pay attention to the reported heat index Remember that the heat index is even higher when you are standing in full sunIf you live in an urban area, you may be especially prone to develop heat exhaustion during a prolonged heat wave; asphalt and concrete store heat during the day and only gradually release it at night, resulting in higher nighttime temperaturesRisk Factors for Heat ExhaustionHeat Index

The heat index is given in degrees FahrenheitThe heat index is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperatureWhen the humidity is high, your sweat cant evaporate as easily, and your body has more difficulty cooling itself, making you prone to heat exhaustion and heatstrokeWhen the heat index is 91 F or higher, you should take precautions to keep cool

Age: Infants and children up to age 4, and adults over age 65, are particularly vulnerable because they adjust to heat more slowly than other peopleCertain Health Conditions: Including heart, lung, or kidney disease, obesity or underweight, high blood pressure, diabetes, mental illness, sickle cell trait, alcoholism, sunburn, and any conditions that cause feverMedications: Including diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, some heart and blood pressure medications, and medications for psychiatric conditionsCheck with your doctor to see if your health conditions and medications are likely to affect your ability to cope with extreme heat and humidity Other Risk FactorsThe most common signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion include:ConfusionDark-colored urine (a sign of dehydration)DizzinessFaintingFatigueHeadacheMuscle crampsNauseaPale SkinCool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heatExcessive sweatingWeak or rapid heartbeatLow blood pressure upon standingSigns and symptoms of heat exhaustion may develop suddenly, or over time, especially with prolonged periods of exercise/physical activity Symptoms of Heat ExhaustionIf you think a person may be experiencing heat exhaustion:Immediately get out of the heat and rest, preferably in an air-conditioned room If you cannot get inside, try to find the nearest cool and shady placeDrink plenty of fluids (avoid caffeine and alcohol)Remove any tight or unnecessary clothing Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bathApply other cooling measures such as fans or ice towelsIf such measures fail to provide relief within 30 minutes, contact your doctorTreatment of Heat ExhaustionAfter youve recovered from heat exhaustion, you may be more sensitive to high temperatures during the following weekIts best to avoid hot weather and heavy exercise until your doctor tells you that its safe to resume your normal activities Take PrecautionsHeatstrokeSection 2Heatstroke is caused by prolonged exposure to high temperatures or by doing physical activity in hot weatherYou are considered to have heatstroke when your body temperature reaches 104 F or higherHeatstroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is a medical emergencyA possible complication of heatstroke is shock, which is a condition caused by a sudden loss of blood flowSigns of shock include a very low blood pressure, blue lips and nails, and cool, clammy skinHeatstroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organsHeatstrokeExposure to a hot environmentStrenuous activityWearing excessive clothingDrinking alcoholBecoming dehydratedCauses of HeatstrokeAnyone can develop heatstroke, but several factors place you at increased risk:Age: Infants and children up to age 4, and adults over age 65, are particularly vulnerable because they adjust to heat more slowly than other peopleHealth Conditions: Including heart, lung, or kidney disease, obesity or underweight, high blood pressure, diabetes, mental illness, sickle cell trait, alcoholism, sunburn, and any conditions that cause feverMedications: Including antihistamines, diet pills, diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, seizure medications, heart and blood pressure medications, and medications for psychiatric illnesses

Risk FactorsA body temperature of 104 F or higher is the main sign of heatstroke FaintingThrobbing headacheDizziness and light-headednessLack of sweating despite the heatRed, hot, and dry skinMuscle weakness or crampsNausea and vomitingRapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weakRapid, shallow breathing Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggeringSeizuresUnconsciousnessSymptoms of HeatstrokeIf you think a person may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical helpCall 911Take immediate action to cool the overheated person while waiting for emergency treatmentHelp the person move to a shaded location and remove excess clothingPlace ice packs or cold, wet towels on the persons head, neck, armpits, and groinMist the person with water while a fan is blowing on him or herTreatment of HeatstrokePreventing Heat-Related IllnessesSection 3When the heat index is high, its best to stay inside in air conditioningIf you must go outdoors, you can prevent heat exhaustion by taking these steps:Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, and a wide-brimmed hatAvoid sunburn; use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Having a sunburn reduces your bodys ability to rid itself of heatPreventing Heat-Related IllnessesTo prevent dehydration, its generally recommended to drink at least 8 glasses of water per day. Because heat-related illness also can result from salt depletion, it may be advisable to substitute an electrolyte-rich sports drink for water during periods of extreme heat and humidityTake additional precautions when working outdoors or doing physical activity/exercise. The general recommendation is to drink 24 ounces of fluid two hours before exercise, and consider adding another 8 ounces of water or sports drink right before exerciseDuring exercise, you should consume another 8 ounces of water every 20 minutes even if you dont feel thirstyAvoid fluids containing either caffeine or alcohol, because both substances can make you lose more fluids and worsen heat exhaustionIf you have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention, check with your doctor before increasing liquid intake

Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses: Drink Extra FluidsOn a hot day, the temperature in your parked car can rise 20 F in just 10 minutes! Let your car cool down before you drive itNever leave anyone in a parked car in hot weather for any period of timeIn slide show mode, click the link below or copy & paste the link in your web browser to view the video:So how hot is it in your car? http://youtu.be/SSnxFea-_eA

The Dangers of Heat in a Parked Carwww.webmd.comwww.mayoclinic.comwww.nws.noaa.govwww.youtube.com

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