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Head Start Lois L. Butler, Head Start (0-5) Director Head Start Central Office PO BOX 2288, 114 E. 11 th Street, Kearney, NE 68848-2288 (308) 865-5690 or www.communityactionmidne.com

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Page 1: Head Start - Community Action Mid-Necommunityactionmidne.com/.../2016/10/Head-Start-0-5... · (308) Head Start Lois L. Butler, Head Start (0-5) Director Head Start Central Office

Head Start Lois L. Butler, Head Start (0-5) Director

Head Start Central Office PO BOX 2288, 114 E. 11th Street, Kearney, NE 68848-2288 (308) 865-5690 or www.communityactionmidne.com

Page 2: Head Start - Community Action Mid-Necommunityactionmidne.com/.../2016/10/Head-Start-0-5... · (308) Head Start Lois L. Butler, Head Start (0-5) Director Head Start Central Office

Head Start and Early Head Start Head Start (0-5) programs all across the nation have transitioned from indefinite grants to a five year grant cycle. All HS grantees are in various stages in their five year grant that has new terms and conditions attached to the Notice of Award. The Office of Head Start (OHS) uses the Aligned Monitoring System to review grantees that addresses the OHS’s need for greater granularity in distinguishing between high and low grantee performance. For a typical five year project period, HS grantees will receive five federal monitoring reviews in the first three years for an intensive examination of performance. The 2015 – 2016 Head Start (0-5) program year was the 3rd year of our 5 year grant cycle. Our Head Start (0-5) program completed all five of the federal monitoring reviews for this 5 year grant period. The five monitoring reviews were as follows:

• Environmental Health & Safety • Fiscal Integrity/Enrollment, Recruitment, Selection, Eligibility, and Attendance (ERSEA) • Teacher-Child Interactions, as addressed through the Classroom Assessment Scoring System

(CLASS) observation in center based classrooms • Comprehensive Services & School Readiness • Leadership, Governance, & Management Systems

o LGMS performance areas are: 1. Program Planning 2. Developing and Organizing Resources 3. Operating and Implementing the Program 4. Evaluating Performance and Stimulating Ongoing Improvement

Each year federal monitoring review reports are issued to grantees for all reviews occurring in years one through three. All five of the reports have been received and resulted in requirement compliances. Our agency and program is proud of the high quality of Head Start and Early Head Start services to pregnant women, infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families.

Next year (2016 – 2017), year 4 in the 5 year grant cycle, our program will receive a final “roll-up” report summarizing the results of years one through three. The monitoring reports summarize the results of on-site reviews that assess grantee compliance with requirements governing HS programs. Year 4, is the year of Evaluation and Year 5 is the Determination year that decides whether a grant is up for competition or receives funding for another five year grant period.

The 2015 – 2016 year has provided the foundation for implementing systemic and integrated comprehensive child development services and family engagement efforts that lead to school readiness for young children and families. School readiness goals as “the expectations of children’s status and progress across domains of language and literary, development, cognition and general knowledge, approaches to learning, physical health and well-being and motor development, and social and emotional development that will improve readiness for kindergarten goals and that appropriately reflect ages of children birth to five, participating in the program”. For parents and families, school readiness means they are engaged in the long-term, lifelong success of their child. Head Start recognizes that parents are their children’s primary teachers and advocates. Head Start (0-5) is certainly living its mission of “strengthening children, families, and communities through quality education, comprehensive health and family services, and by fostering community partnerships”.

Lois L. Butler, CCAP, Head Start and Early Head Start Director

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 2

Page 3: Head Start - Community Action Mid-Necommunityactionmidne.com/.../2016/10/Head-Start-0-5... · (308) Head Start Lois L. Butler, Head Start (0-5) Director Head Start Central Office

Head Start/Early Head Start (pregnant women, infants, toddlers and preschoolers) Philosophy

The mission of Head Start is to strengthen children, families and communities through quality education, comprehensive health and family services, and by fostering community partnerships.

The primary goal of our Head Start program is to provide comprehensive Head Start programming to not only the enrolled children and their families, but to continue pursuit of additional funding to serve the underserved populations and un-served counties through expansion and/or collaborations. Community assessments are reviewed to ensure the program options fit community and county needs.

Head Start continues to collaborate with partners such as school districts, educational service units, cooperatives, universities, colleges, and other local or state early childhood and family development entities. Mid Head Start will ensure compliance with performance standards while maximizing resources.

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 3

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Head Start, a Pathway to Success

It all began October of 1990 when a beautiful, red headed, freckle faced little girl was born. We didn’t met her until a few years later when she was known as Punky by Mrs. Sue and her Head Start classmates. Liz had speech issues that required an IEP and special services that began at Head Start and continued to Jr. High. Being shy to begin with and then having speech problems established a protective shell around Liz that only became thicker when she was 7 years old and molestation became a common occurrence in her life.

We meet up again with her in August of 2013, this time as a parent of a three year old boy who was starting at Head Start. Liz was very quiet in the beginning. Wanting to be the best parent she started volunteering right away. She allowed her name to run for Policy Council and was elected. Liz was willing and able to attend, with encouragement she even made a motion. At the next Family Connection she was really stretched by giving a report. This was the start of something new for Liz, enabling others to see her confidence grow allowing her to become a leader on Parent Committees. Liz faced many obstacles over the next couple of years and removed many layers of her protective shell. When her son had to be tested based on his ASQ, ASQSE and Articulation screening it took her emotionally to the fear that she felt towards the Speech Pathologist that worked with her. Working hard to not put on more layers, but keeping an open line of communication, wanting only the best for her son, allowed Liz to remove layers and get the services he needed. In spring of 2015 when her son needed surgery on his feet to be able to walk correctly, more layers were removed and she became a stronger advocate for her son with the doctors. Also, during this time she really began to shine by being the Secretary Alternate at Policy Council where she was the recording secretary for 3 of the 5 meetings. She regularly spoke up at meetings and advocated for Head Start in the community. September 2015 started a new chapter in the life of Head Start Student “Punky” when she, with much support, applied for the job of Cook at the Center she started out in so many years ago. She said we helped her develop confidence through interaction with staff, Policy Council and local Parent Committees that she needed to even apply for the job. Liz blew away those who interviewed her because of her support and respect that she has for Head Start and the way it has changed her life. From the shy, quiet student to the quiet, supportive worker Liz is such an asset making a difference in the lives of the next generation of Head Start students.

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 4

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Our Early Head Start center had a “Family Connection” event that focused on Nutrition. Alvin Mayes, Executive Chef and

Juan Herrera, Sous Chef of Chartwells UNK Dining prepared a meal for the families using only ingredients that could be

obtained with WIC Checks. The main point of the presentation was to show families how to prepare not so plain foods

with what they could get with their monthly WIC coupons. Kelsey Bair from WIC also came in to present to the families

about the WIC program. The Chefs prepared Salmon Croquets, Savory Brown Rice, and fresh green beans, and fresh

fruit platter. The recipes were given to the families that attended, and Alvin described how the meal was prepped and

cooked.

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 5

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Head Start Head Start (3-5) Snapshot Program Year 8-01-15 to 7-31-16

• Center Based: 18 • Home Based: 7 • Funded Enrollment: 338

o Center Base Enrollment: 48 o Home Base Enrollment: 70

• Head Start Actual Enrollment: 367

o Returning Children: 137 o New Children: 230

• Head Start is an inclusive program that is the least

restrictive environment for many children with diagnosed disabilities. During this year 18.53% of the 367 Head Start children served were children with diagnosed disabilities.

• Average Monthly Enrollment

o Center Base: 85% Reasons for absences:

1. Health Reasons 2. No Phone Call

• Annual number of home visits completed o Home Base: 626 visits

Reasons for absences: 1. Health Reasons 2. Out of town

• Head Start serves nutritious foods to our enrolled

children through meals and snacks.

• Breakdown of meals served in 2015-2016 year o Breakfast: 26,409 o AM Snack : 16,633 o Lunch: 14,982 o PM Snack: 5,186

• Percentages of enrolled children that received their

exams are as follows: o Dental: 86% o Medical: 92% o Vision: 93%

• Head Start employs 73 staff

• Head Start meets/exceeds the Head Start requirements for teachers to have an AA or BA in early childhood.

• The most recent financial audit was completed for the

fiscal year ending September 30, 2016. There were no audit findings. Please see the agency audit on the website http://communityactionmidne.com/public-sector-information/ for actual Head Start and Early Head Start expenditures.

Income below 100%

poverty line

67.57%

Public Assistance

4.09%

Foster Children

5.18%

Homeless10.08%

100% -129.9% above poverty line

5.18%over 130%

above poverty line

7.90%

Income Served

Income below 100%

poveerty line

80.60%

Public Assistanc

e1.49%Foster

Children0.00%

Homeless17.91%

100%-129.9% above

povertly line

0.00%

Income Served

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 6

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Early Head Start (0-3) Snapshot Enrollment Year 08-01-15 to 07-31-16

• Center Base: 7 • Home Base: 2 • Funded Enrollment: 48

o Center Base Enrollment: 28 o Home Base Enrollment: 20

• Early Head Start Actual Enrollment: 67

o Pregnant Women: 8 o Infants and Toddlers: 59

• Early Head Start is an inclusive program

that is the least restrictive environment for many children with diagnosed disabilities. During this year 13% of the 68 Early Head Start children served were children with diagnosed disabilities.

• Average Monthly Enrollment o Center Base: 86%

Reasons for absences: 1. Health Reasons 2. Staying with Relatives

• Annual number of home visits completed o Home Base: 486 visits

Reasons for absences: 1. Health Reasons 2. Other Obligations

• Early Head Start serves nutritious foods to our enrolled children through meals and snacks.

• Breakdown of meals served in 2015-2016 year o Breakfast: 4,709 o Lunch: 4,781 o PM Snack: 4,594

• Percentages of enrolled children that received

their exams are as follows: o Dental: 89% o Medical: 81% o Vision: 100%

• Early Head Start employs 13 staff

• Early Head Start meets/exceeds the Early Head

Start requirements for teachers to have an AA or BA in early childhood.

• The most recent financial audit was completed

for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016. There were no audit findings. Please see the agency audit on the website http://communityactionmidne.com/public-sector-information/ for actual Head Start and Early Head Start expenditures.

White44.12%

Hispanic/ Latino

41.18%

Biracial/ Multiracial

13.24%Asian1.47%

Race/Ethnicity of Enrolled Children

Income below 100% poverty line…

Public Assistance

4.41%

Foster Children

5.88%

Homeless22.06%

100%-129.9% above povertly line

4.41%

Income Served

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 7

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Head Start 2015-2016 Proposed Budget Total funds received for budget year 8-1-15 to 7-31-16 was $2,749,175.00.

Non Federal match - $687,294 (including estimated $24,000.00 funding from 5 United Ways (Kearney Area, Cozad, Gothenburg, Lexington, Mid Plains – North Platte) and McCook Community Chest

CACFP meal reimbursement estimates - $119,375.00

Head Start 2015-2016 Actual Budget Total Expenditures for budget year 8-1-2015 to 7-31-2016 was $2,749,175.00.

Non Federal match - $945,215.91 (including $25,717.42 from 5 United Ways (Kearney Area, Cozad, Gothenburg, Lexington, Mid Plains – North Platte) and McCook Community Chest

CACFP meal reimbursements - $112,233.68

$1,450,834.00

$422,086.00

$355,854.00 $3,863.00

$77,044.00 $24,000.00

$29,702.00

$347,410.00

$38,382.00

Proposed

Personnel Fringe Benefits Indirect Costs Travel Supplies

Equipment Contractual Other Training

$1,466,264.55

$364,613.38

$347,866.71$3,549.74

$120,015.24

$47,576.29

$42,922.19 $317,984.90 $38,382.00

Actual

Personnel Fringe Benefits Indirect Costs Travel

Supplies Contractual Other Training

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 8

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Early Head Start 2015-2016 Proposed Budget Total Funds received for budget year 8-1-2015 to 7-31-2016 was $664,369.00.

Non Federal Match - $166,093.00 CACFP meal reimbursement estimates $34,146.00

Early Head Start 2015-2016 Actual Budget

Total funds received for budget year 8-1-2015 to 7-31-2016 was $664,369.00. Non federal match - $182,485.25 (including $154.64 from Kearney Area United Way)

CACFP meal reimbursements- $28,903.92

$361,576.00

$112,847.00

$90,141.00

$3,552.00

$11,170.00

$3,150.00 $65,932.00

$16,001.00

Proposed

Personnel Fringe Benefits Indirect Costs Travel

Supplies Contractual Other Training

$365,694.50

$100,442.84

$88,566.09

$4,109.14

$19,886.10

$1,578.43

$68,090.90$16,001.00 Actual

Personnel Fringe Benefits Indirect Costs Travel

Supplies Contractual Other Training

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 9

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School Readiness

Head Start/ Early Head Starts efforts to prepare children for Kindergarten are as follows:

Children will demonstrate understanding of basic concepts such as scientific concepts including but not limited to: cause and effect, deductive reasoning (predicting and experimenting to get solutions), and effective questioning through exploration, in hands on and discovery based learning activities.

• Children will apply early mathematic concepts into daily learning by counting, sorting, patterning, analyzing characteristics of objects, comparing /contrasting and sequencing.

• (EHS) Children will develop and use math concepts through-out the day. • (EHS) Children will use their senses to discover cause and effect. • (EHS) Children will integrate previous knowledge with new information to learn.

Approaches to Learning

• Children will exhibit an interest in a variety of genres, topics, and activities to promote active learning as well as individualized learning.

• Children will engage, at their developmental level, activities that extend their knowledge and desire to adhere to a task through a variety of teaching activities that meet the need of all learning modalities (visual, auditory, tactile, and kinesthetic).

• (EHS) Children will develop an interest in exploring the world around them. • (EHS) Children will develop descriptive vocabulary in what they are thinking and doing.

• Social and Emotional Development • Children will demonstrate self-regulation through social stories, role playing, daily interaction with peers and

positive guidance strategies. • (EHS) Children will develop positive relationships with peers and adults. • (EHS) Children will begin to develop self-regulation skills • Physical Development and Health • Children will strengthen gross motor. • Children will strengthen and develop fine motor muscles. • Children will apply knowledge of my plate to be able to choose health snacks and meals to eat. • (EHS) Children will develop large and fine motor skills to move throughout their environment. • (EHS) Children will learn and begin to demonstrate healthy and safe habits.

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 10

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Child Outcomes

Pre-school

Head Start is a quality Early Childhood program that specializes in providing our students with the most optimal learning experiences possible to give the students a “Head Start” when beginning kindergarten. Head Start utilizes quality research based curriculums, assessment tools and best practice. The assessment tool that we utilize at Head Start is the Child Observation Record (COR). The children in our center based Head Start learn best through the interactions with their peers and teachers in their natural learning environment. COR enables the teachers to monitor development and achievement in areas such as Social Relations, Mathematics, and Science using authentic anecdotal notes that occur naturally throughout the day. The teachers are required to submit their Child Outcomes three times a year for part day, part year programs, and four times a year for full day, full year programs, so the administrative staff can monitor progress and the success of each child in the Head Start Program.

Head Start has twelve center based sites, which consist of 18 centers: 15 part-day part-year, 3 full-day full year, and 7 home base centers. The center based centers utilize the Child Observation Record (COR); however, Head Start’s home base centers utilize a quality research based curriculum- the Hawaiian Early Learning Profile (HELP). HELP is similar to COR as the staff is required to submit outcomes three times a year to the Head Start administrative staff. HELP monitors the students’ progress in areas such as cognitive, language, fine motor and gross motor development. Each of the Head Start Home Based centers has a Family Educator that visits the homes of their students. The Family Educators are required to make 32 home visits to each of the ten families they serve. They coach the parents to work with the children by providing strategies and ideas to the families. Head Start is a quality early childhood program that places priority on best practice and quality education.

*The outcomes below are based on The Child Observation Record

PhysicalDevelopment &

Health

Social & EmotionalDevelopment

Approaches toLearning

Language &Literacy

Cognition &General

KnowledgeFall 2015 2.82 2.77 2.75 3.43 2.78Winter 2015/2016 3.53 3.56 3.34 4.19 3.54Spring 2016 4.15 4.35 4.17 4.85 4.19Summer 2016 4.35 4.46 4.41 5.18 4.36

0.001.002.003.004.005.006.00

Head Start Center Base Child Outcomes (COR)

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 11

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*The outcomes below are based on the Hawaii Early Learning Profile (HELP) curriculum assessment data

Child Outcomes

Infant/Toddler

Early Head Start in Buffalo County began offering home based services in August of 2011 and center based services in January of 2012. The center based program has 3 infant groups serving 12 children ages 0-18 months and 4 toddler groups serving 16 children ages 18 months – 3 years. The center based program offers a 7 hour Early Head Start day Monday through Friday for working families. The home based program has two family educators that work with 20 children and families and complete 48 home visits for each of the families. Our center based option uses the High Scope curriculum and utilizes the Child Observation Record (COR). The staff submits Child Observation Reports (outcomes) four times a year. These reports show the growth of the infant and toddlers in the areas of sense of self, social relations, creative representations, movement, communication and language, and exploration and early logic. The home based program utilizes the Hawaii Early Learning Profile (HELP) a quality researched base curriculum and assessment, the results of which guide the activities that the parent and staff work on with the child.

LanguageDevelopment Literacy Mathematics Science Creative Arts

Social andEmotional

Development

Approachesto Learning

PhysicalHealth and

DevelopmentTime 1 13.2 5.8 11.5 10.0 9.9 9.3 9.0 11.7Time 2 15.8 7.9 15.0 13.0 12.8 11.2 11.5 14.5Time 3 25.3 14.1 22.9 19.9 19.2 17.8 18.4 22.5

0.0

5.0

10.0

15.0

20.0

25.0

30.0

Head Start Home Base Child Outcomes (HELP)

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 12

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*The outcomes below are based on the High Scope Curriculum Child Observation Record (COR)

Parent Engagement

The Head Start Parent, Family and Community Engagement Framework is a tool designed to assist Head Start and Early Head Start in successfully partnering with families to help their children be ready for school and a lifetime of academic success.

The objectives of parent and family engagement in Early Head Start/Head Start are to:

o Support family well-being o Support strong relationships between parents and their children o Promote and provide ongoing learning and development for both parents and children

Language &Literacy

Cognition &General

Knowledge

Approaches toLearning

Physical Well-Being & MotorDevelopment

Social & EmotionalDevelopment

Fall 2015 1.23 1.27 1.47 1.68 1.38Winter 2015/2016 1.56 1.62 1.93 2.25 1.80Spring 2016 1.86 1.84 2.03 2.81 2.08Summer 2016 2.12 2.07 2.31 3.17 2.42

0.000.501.001.502.002.503.003.50

Early Head Start Center Base Child Outcomes (COR)

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 13

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Parent, family, and community engagement is integrated in our program management, continuous improvement systems and staff development. All Early Head Start and Head Start staff play a role in engaging families and supporting school readiness. Our comprehensive program looks at the strengths, interests and needs of each child and family and then connects the families with services and resources so they can achieve outcomes that lead to positive and lasting change. Parent engagement activities may include:

o Parent input into menus, curriculum, social events

o Decision making opportunities through parent committees, policy council o Parent input into HS 0-5 health services through Health Services Advisory Committee (HSAC) o Participating in program activities such as “Week of the Young Child” activities, staff/parent

work days, recruitment efforts, presentations along with staff to community partners. o Working in the classrooms assisting the teachers with the planned activities

Results, Oriented, Management and Accountability (ROMA) Data:

We offer many opportunities in the Head Start 0-5 program for families to participate in the program. Opportunities include but are not limited: election to Policy Council, participating in committees, completing at home activities, and learning about developmentally appropriate activities. There were 72,195 volunteer hours donated to Head Start during the 2015-2016 program year:

Early Head Start (EHS) Center Based End of Year Survey Results

o 95% Increased their knowledge of social emotional development o 95% Increased their knowledge of child development o 100% Indicated their child’s educational needs and goals were met while in the program o 31.25% of EHS parents indicated because of increased wage they discontinued state services.

• Head Start Home Based (HB) End of the Year Survey Results o 100% Increased their knowledge of social emotional development o 98% Increased their knowledge of child development o 98% Indicated their child’s educational needs and goals were met while in the program o 17% of HS-HB parents indicated because of increased wage they discontinued state services

• Head Start Center Based (CB) End of Year Survey Results o 98% Increased their knowledge of social emotional development o 95% Increased their knowledge of child development o 99% Indicated their child’s educational needs and goals were met while in the program o 19% of HS-CB parents indicated because of increased wage they discontinued states services

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 14

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1. 2. Kearney Green 3. Kearney Orange 4. Kearney Red 5. Kearney Purple- full day/full year 6. Early Head Start Blue I 7. Early Head Start Blue II 8. Early Head Start Green I 9. Early Head Start Green II 10. Early Head Start Red 11. Early Head Start Yellow I 12. Early Head Start Yellow II 13. Lexington AM 14. Lexington PM 15. McCook – full day/full year 16. Minden 17. North Platte AM2 18. North Platte AM1 19. North Platte PM1 20. North Platte full day/full year 21. Ogallala 22. Ravenna

Home Based Option:

EHS Buffalo I EHS Buffalo II Dawson County Frontier County Furnas I County

Community Action Partnership of Mid Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Counties Served

15 counties in Nebraska 2 counties in Kansas

Center Based Options:

1. Cozad 2. Gibbon 3. Holdrege 4. Kearney Blue 5. Kearney Green 6. Kearney Orange 7. Kearney Red 8. Kearney Purple fd/fy 9. Early Head Start Blue I 10. Early Head Start Blue II 11. Early Head Start Green I 12. Early Head Start Green II 13. Early Head Start Red 14. Early Head Start Yellow I 15. Early Head Start Yellow II 16. Lexington AM 17. Lexington PM 18. McCook – fd/fy 19. Minden 20. North Platte pd/py 21. North Platte fd/py 22. North Platte fd/fy 23. Ogallala 24. Ravenna

Home Based Options:

EHS Buffalo I EHS Buffalo II Dawson County Frontier County Furnas I County Furnas II County Harlan County Norton County, KS Phillips County, KS

Community Action Partnership of Nebraska Head Start/Early Head Start Annual Report Page 15