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1 INSIDE THIS ISSUE 1. Holt Collier. 2. Div Cmdrs Address 3. Around the Division 4. Division Calendar 5. Holt Collier Cont.. 6 Camp Business 7,8. Cmdr & Chief address 9. Billy Titus 10. Color Guard, Trivia Kansas . Holt Collier Private; Company I, 9th Texas Cavalry On a cool, sunny Saturday afternoon February 28, 2004, the Old South met the New South at Live Oak Cemetery on South Main Street in Greenville, Mississippi. Men in Confederate Uniform and ladies in hoop skirts and hats met with their modern counterparts, Black and White, to pay tribute to one of Mississippi’s famous sons, Holt Collier. After years of diligent research by author Minor Buchanan, events were put in motion to place a Confederate Headstone at the gravesite of Holt Collier. Spearheaded by the B/G Benjamin G. Humphreys Camp # 1625 of Indianola and supported by the Ella Palmer Chapter # 9, Order of the Confederate Rose of Indianola; the Pvt. Taylor Rucks Chapter # 2204, United Daughters of the Confederacy of Greenville; Live Oak Cemetery Association of Greenville; Jefferson Davis Camp # 635 of Jackson; Holt Collier Camp # 2018 of West Point and Gen. Charles Clark Chapter # 235 of Indianola, a Confederate Headstone was acquired from the Veterans Administration and preparations were made for the dedication of the headstone. Holt Collier was born into slavery in 1846 and was the slave of Howell Hinds. Hinds County is named after Howell’s father, Gen. Thomas Hinds. At a very early age, Holt demonstrated his marksmanship with the rifle. At the age of 10, he killed his first Black Bear which would be one of over 3000 killed by Holt. At the outbreak of the War for Southern Independence, Holt’s master and son left for the War after giving him his freedom papers and being told he was too young to fight and to remain on the plantation. Holt disobeyed his master by running away from the plantation, stowing away on a riverboat and joining Howell and his son in Memphis, TN. Holt He joined the 9th Texas Brigade by his own choice and served throughout the war. He finished his service as one of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s most trusted cavalry scouts, known as a superb horseman and marksman. During Reconstruction, Holt was accused and acquitted for the alleged murder of Captain James King by a military tribunal in Vicksburg. B.G. Albert Pike Camp #1439 Gen Lewis A Armistead Camp # 1846 Cols Lewis & Harrison Camp # 1854 Gen William Steele Camp # 1857 Major Thomas J. Key Camp # 1920 South Kansas Camp # 2064 BG Buckner & Chilton Camp #. 2227 Volume XV. Issue 10 October 2013

Gen Lewis A Armistead Camp # 1846 Cols Lewis & Harrison ... · 3 Pat O'Connor here from South Kansas Camp #2064.I'm fairly new in the SCV and the Mechanized Cavalry. I've noticed

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  • 1

    INSIDE THIS ISSUE

    1. Holt Collier.

    2. Div Cmdrs Address

    3. Around the Division

    4. Division Calendar

    5. Holt Collier Cont..

    6 Camp Business

    7,8. Cmdr & Chief address

    9. Billy Titus

    10. Color Guard, Trivia Kansas

    INSIDE THIS ISSUE

    1.

    .

    Holt Collier Private;

    Company I, 9th Texas Cavalry On a cool, sunny Saturday afternoon February 28, 2004, the Old South met the New South at Live

    Oak Cemetery on South Main Street in Greenville, Mississippi. Men in Confederate Uniform and

    ladies in hoop skirts and hats met with their modern counterparts, Black and White, to pay tribute to

    one of Mississippi’s famous sons, Holt Collier.

    After years of diligent research by author Minor Buchanan, events were put in motion to place a

    Confederate Headstone at the gravesite of Holt Collier. Spearheaded by the B/G Benjamin G.

    Humphreys Camp # 1625 of Indianola and supported by the Ella Palmer Chapter # 9, Order of the

    Confederate Rose of Indianola; the Pvt. Taylor Rucks Chapter # 2204, United Daughters of the

    Confederacy of Greenville; Live Oak Cemetery Association of Greenville; Jefferson Davis Camp # 635 of Jackson;

    Holt Collier Camp # 2018 of West Point and Gen. Charles Clark Chapter # 235 of Indianola, a Confederate

    Headstone was acquired from the Veterans Administration and preparations were made for the dedication of the

    headstone.

    Holt Collier was born into slavery in 1846 and was the slave of Howell Hinds. Hinds County is

    named after Howell’s father, Gen. Thomas Hinds. At a very early age, Holt demonstrated his

    marksmanship with the rifle. At the age of 10, he killed his first Black Bear which would be one of

    over 3000 killed by Holt. At the outbreak of the War for Southern Independence, Holt’s master and

    son left for the War after giving him his freedom papers and being told he was too young to fight

    and to remain on the plantation. Holt disobeyed

    his master by running away from the plantation,

    stowing away on a riverboat and joining Howell and his son in

    Memphis, TN. Holt He joined the 9th

    Texas Brigade by his own choice and

    served throughout the war. He finished

    his service as one of Nathan Bedford

    Forrest’s most trusted cavalry scouts,

    known as a superb horseman and

    marksman. During Reconstruction, Holt was accused and acquitted for the

    alleged murder of Captain James

    King by a military tribunal in Vicksburg.

    B.G. Albert Pike Camp #1439 Gen Lewis A Armistead Camp # 1846 Cols Lewis & Harrison Camp # 1854 Gen William Steele Camp # 1857 Major Thomas J. Key Camp # 1920 South Kansas Camp # 2064 BG Buckner & Chilton Camp #. 2227

    Volume XV. Issue 10

    October 2013

  • 2

    Greetings Compatriots of the Kansas Division

    When I was elected, I had…and still do have… intentions on visiting all of the camps, however

    my wife had surgery on her ankle shortly after I returned from the National Reunion, so her

    immobility issues have in turn prevented me from getting out as much as I had planned. I hope to

    start visiting as soon as she heals up and can get around on her own again.

    I would like to clarify a statement I made last month about a Confederate VA marker being turned

    down for a Confederate sailor. I was mistaken on that it was a Confederate pension that was

    turned down as proof, instead it was apparently a copy (or maybe an original) of the application.

    An approved pension should be accepted as proof of service, though I cannot say for sure.

    We are planning on having a DEC meeting on Dec 14 at the Best Western in Emporia at

    9:00 AM. If you cannot make it, but have matters that needs brought up or wants discussed,

    please let me know.

    In the short time I have been Division Commander, I believe one of the hardest things to do is to

    write something for the Commanders Address. I have run across some interesting articles while

    researching the Confederates that are buried in Kansas, and will share some of them. The first

    one is of particular interest, as it does not provide a name for the deceased. It was in the Emporia

    Daily Gazette, June 25, 1907.

    Concordia, Kans. - Did you notice the article in the Kansan last evening, about the Grand Army

    furnishing the pall bearers and sending a wreath to put on the coffin of an ex-Confederate soldier

    at Clay Center on Sunday? Did you notice it was an ex-union soldier who preached the funeral

    sermon? Say, didn’t it make you swell up with pride that you were an American citizen, a part of

    a community where such brave men live? It takes brave men to do that sort of thing.

    Now, the last line sounds rather facetious, but the preceding line is one I really agree with, as that

    could be taken as referring to the pall bearers, the person giving the sermon, AND the

    Confederate veteran. That may have not been the writer’s intent, (especially considering other

    content I have seen from that newspaper) but we know the bravery of the Confederates. If the

    writer was indeed being sarcastic, I have found several articles that does show there was not the

    animosity between Union and Confederates that many perceive, and they worked and socialized

    together. One Confederate I have found several references about include this one from the

    Hutchison News, June 1, 1920

    Two old settlers of the Sego neighborhood died recently, two days apart:. T.J. Honey and J T.

    McPhooter on the 31st. Both located in the Sego locality about the same time in 1879. Mr. Honey

    was an ex-Confederate veteran, but the G.A.R. folks seldom had a bean bake or reunion but what

    "Dad" Honey was here, too.

    Confederate Regards,

    Kevin Ivey

  • 3

    Pat O'Connor here from South Kansas Camp #2064. I'm fairly

    new in the SCV and the Mechanized Cavalry. I've noticed a lot of good

    camaraderie in the Sons of Confederate Veterans and also by extension,

    in the Mechanized Cavalry.

    I think Kansas needs more recruits in the 1st Battalion Company F,

    Mechanized Cavalry, Captain Jim Bowling in effective command--which

    is where Kansas is assigned. I believe we have a total of six. If we had

    more, Kansas Mechanized Cavalry members could plan rides, parade

    participation, charity runs and other worthwhile endeavors.

    To that end, I urge all Kansas Sons of Confederate Veterans who ride

    or like motorcycles (you don't have to own one) to join the Cavalry!

    There is a one-time fee of $100.00 and for this you get a 12-inch patch as

    well as rockers that say 1st Battalion and Company F. Do some research

    if you like at http://www.scvmccsa.org/

    If anyone needs me, I will be happy to serve as referral. Or just contact

    any other SCVMC member. I'm at [email protected] (night or

    day)

    Confederate Enlistment

    New Recruits

    B.G. Albert Pike Camp # 1439 None

    Lewis A. Armistead Camp # 1847 None

    Col’s Lewis & Harrison Camp #1854 None

    William Steele Camp# 1857 Dr. Ivan Welch

    Pvt. Henry C. Wayland, Co. F, Timmon's Reg Texas Inf..

    Lt Cmdr Kevin Freese

    Pvt. Pleasant Huchinson, Co. H, 22nd North Carolina Inf Reg.

    Maj. Thomas J. Key Camp # 1920 John Kirchmyer Jr.

    South Kansas Camp # 2064 None BG Buckner & Chilton Camp #2227 None

    June Camp Agendas

    B.G. Albert Pike Camp # 1439

    Oct 12 No Report

    Lewis A. Armistead Camp # 1847 Oct 12 No Report

    Col’s Lewis & Harrison Camp #1854

    Oct 19 Not yet determined

    William Steele Camp# 1857 Oct 08 No Report

    Maj. Thomas J. Key Camp # 1920 . Oct 03 Civil War Women’s organizations

    By Beth Foulk

    South Kansas Camp # 2064 Oct 10th DVD presentation of Pastor John Weaver "A Defense for the Confederate Flag"

    BG Buckner & Chilton Camp #2227] Oct 28 No Report

    The Major Thomas J. Key Camp is proud to announce that it

    will be hosting an SCV Leadership Workshop here in Kansas

    City on Saturday 16 November. (page 6 for details)

    The Major Thomas J. Key Camp will celebrate its ninth year as

    it participates in the Ottawa Veterans Day Parade Saturday 9

    November. (page 6 for details)

    Right on the heels of the Ottawa parade is the Leavenworth

    Veterans Day Parade, which is on Monday 11 November.

    This held on the actual Veterans Day. (page 6 for details)

    Dispatches from the Front

    Intelligence from

    the Wire… Events

    in Kansas Division

    Why not cross this fence and join the SCV

    brother?

    http://www.scvmccsa.org/mailto:[email protected]

  • 4

    \

    Red Letters Generals Blue Letters Camp Meetings Black Letters Camp Members

    Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    1. Travis Bullock

    B-day Key Camp

    2.

    3.

    Maj. Thomas J. Key

    Camp Meets

    4.

    5.

    6. . John Weir

    B-day Key Camp

    7.

    Gen Richard

    Anderson DOB

    1821 Hillcrest, S.C

    8.

    Gen William Steele

    Camp Meets

    Lane Smith

    B-day Key Camp

    Gen Wm. Mahone

    DOD 1895 Washington

    9.

    10.

    South Kansas

    Camp Meets

    11.

    12.

    Gen Robert E Lee

    DOD 1870. Lexington

    B.G. Albert Pike,

    Gen Lewis Armistead &

    13.

    14.

    15.

    16. 17.

    18.

    19.

    Cols Lewis & Harrison

    Camp Meets

    20.

    Gen Stephen

    Ramseur DOD 1864

    Battle of Cedar Creek

    Gen James Walker

    DOB 1901 VA

    Mark Otey

    B-Day Armistead Camp

    21.

    22. 23.

    24.

    Gen James Archer

    DOB 1864 Richmond

    VA

    25. 26.

    27. 28.

    BG Buckner & Chilton Camp Meets

    29.

    Lt Gen Nathan B

    Forrest DOD 1877

    Memphis Tennessee

    30. 31.

    Gen Evander M Law DOD 1920 Bartow,

    Florida

    Robert E Lee Nathan b Forrest Richard Anderson William Mahone Stephen Ramsuer

    James Walker James Archer Evander M Law

  • 5

    Holt Collier Cont.

    Holt left the state on advice given by William A. Percy

    of Greenville going to Texas working as a cowboy on

    the ranch of his former commander, Sullivan Ross,

    future Governor of Texas. Upon the murder of his former master, Holt returned

    to Greenville for his funeral and remained in

    Greenville for the rest of his life. Holt became

    nationally known in 1903 as

    the guide for the Teddy

    Roosevelt Bear Hunt of that

    year. This hunt gave rise to

    the “Teddy Bear” when

    Teddy refused to shoot a bear

    captured by Holt and tied to a

    tree. Holt lived to the age of

    about 90, passing from this

    life on August 1, 1936. Holt was buried on August 3 in

    Live Oak Cemetery which is located on the old

    Plumridge Plantation where Holt grew-up and hunted

    black bear.

    With the national flags of the Confederacy flying,

    Benj. G. Humphreys Camp Commander Earl McCown

    opened the ceremony with the introduction of Dr. John

    Brooks of Greenville, who read an original poem

    about Holt Collier entitled “Holt

    Collier’s Ghost”. After the

    reading, the Colors were

    presented by members of

    Company D, CS Marines

    commanded by 1st Sgt Larry

    McCluney of Greenwood. The

    Honor Guard, comprised of members from at least 8

    re-enactment groups from three states was marched in

    under the command of Lt. Col. Alan Palmer, Jeff

    Davis Indpt Battalion. Holy Scripture reading and

    Prayer were offered by the Rev. Joseph Wright of New

    White Stone M. B. Church and Rev. Richard William

    of Zion M. B. Church, respectfully. The Pledge of

    Allegiance and salutes to the Mississippi State Flag

    and Flag of the Confederacy was led by Camp Color

    Sergeant Thomas Haik, Jr.

    We were fortunate to have family members of

    Holt Collier present for the

    Dedication. The family members

    present were Mrs. Ann Marie

    Parker, Great Niece; her son John

    Parker and Grandson Brandon

    John Parker. Two other Great

    Nieces arriving late were, Mrs.

    Nola Leggett and Mrs. Corine

    Wilson. Greenville Mayor

    Heather McTeer- Hudson represented the City of

    Greenville and Juliet Thomas represented U. S.

    Representative Bennie Thompson.

    The MS Division was represented by Ron

    Stowers, Chief of Staff; Ed Sheely, 4th

    Brigade Commander and Larry

    McCluney, 1st Brigade Commander. The MS Division,

    United Daughters of the Confederacy was represented

    by President Gloria Adcock, Past

    President Mabel Clark, 2nd

    Vice-

    President Lou Paris, and Historian

    Nancy Powell. Special recognition

    was given to Richard and Beverly

    Cross from Baxter, Iowa. Mrs.

    Cross is a distant relative of President Teddy

    Roosevelt and Capt. James King. She is also the

    President of the Jasper County Museum in Iowa.

    Minor Buchanan, author of the book “Holt

    Collier, His Life, His Roosevelt Hunts, and The Origin

    of the Teddy Bear” was the keynote speaker. Minor

    made note that this was a unique occasion where Black

    and White citizens came together to recognize

    Mississippi’s only official Confederate Soldier of

    African descent under the auspices of the Sons of

    Confederate Veterans to place a Confederate Marker

    on his grave site that had gone unmarked for almost 68

    years. Minor added, “This is recognition of the life and

    legacy of Holt Collier.” Following Minor’s talk, the

    Rev. Albert Calvin, former minister of Mt. Horeb M.

    B. Church officially blessed and dedicated the marker

    for Holt Collier and added, “May he continue to rest in

    peace.” Soloist Nancy Bryson sang “Amazing Grace”

    while CS Marines Thomas Haik and Andrew

    McCaskill folded the “Stainless Banner” that covered

    the marker for presentation to the family. The Flag

    was reverently passed to 1st Sgt McCluney, then to Lt.

    Col Alan Palmer who presented the Flag to Mrs.

    Parker who graciously accepted it and cradled it in her

    lap as the final lines of the hymn were sung. Following

    the presentation of the Flag, the Honor Guard fired

    three volleys in honor of Holt. In the distance, lone

    trumpeter Brent Hiter played taps.

    The closing prayer was offered up

    by Camp Chaplain Lofton

    Davidson. A reception was held

    at the Mississippi Welcome

    Center on Highway 82W just south of Greenville.

    Of the occasion, Mrs. Parker was quoted by

    David Lush, “I think this is a great honor to dedicate

    and place this marker to him. I certainly appreciate

    this, and especially this (as she held the Flag close to

    her heart). I know he would be proud of this day and to

    be remembered and honored like this. He was a

    remarkable man.”

  • 6

    SCV Leadership Workshop The Major Thomas J. Key Camp is proud to announce that it will be hosting an SCV Leadership Workshop here in

    Kansas City on Saturday November 16th

    . This workshop has the potential to draw attendees from the Kansas

    Division, the Missouri Division, and possibly from Nebraska, Iowa, and Oklahoma as well. These workshops are

    very popular and have been extremely successful. They are working closely with Lieutenant Commander-in-Chief Kelly Barrow on the details. They anticipate having room for about 40 attendees. Details will be forth coming but I

    can assure you that the class will fill quickly so mark your calendar and plan to register as soon as the forms are available.

    Ottawa Veterans Day Parade

    The Ottawa Veterans Day Parade will be on Saturday November 9th

    . This will be The Major Thomas J. Key Camps

    eighth or ninth year in this parade. There will be activities and displays in Forest Park after the parade. It will

    include a skirmish in which the cannon of our 3rd

    Battery will be involved. They will meet in the bank parking lot at

    Fourth and Walnut (one block west of Main). They need to arrive by around 9:00 a.m. so They can decorate their

    float (the cannon on the trailer) and assign positions for everyone. This a great place to wear your Confederate

    uniform or your camp shirt. If you don’t want to walk the route you can ride on the trailer. Everyone is welcome

    and encouraged to attend.

    Leavenworth Veterans Day Parade Right on the heels of the Ottawa parade is the Leavenworth Veterans Day Parade, which is on Monday November

    11th

    . This held on the actual Veterans Day. It is one of the largest parades in the mid-western United States and

    draws thousands of spectators. Regrettably, it generally falls on a weekday so our turnout is generally small as most of our compatriots work. In the past, we have done a joint Color Guard with the Sons of Union Veterans but this

    year it will depend on how many of our members can be there. Hopefully, the weather this year will be better than

    last year. Last year it really was miserably cold and wet. HOWEVER, we still had a good time. Again, if you can get

    to this parade it would really be appreciated.

    Brigadier General William Steele Camp 1857 had the honor of swearing in two new

    members, Dr. Ivan Welch and Lt Cmdr Kevin Freese at the Charles Jennison house in

    Leavenworth, Kansas.

  • 7

    23 September 2013

    Charleston, South Carolina

    Re: Offensive PR Strategy Order 1

    Urgent read to the end and act ASAP!

    Officers and Compatriots of the SCV,

    I hope you are well. At our recent reunion in Vicksburg, Mississippi, I asked a packed hall; if after all these years of

    struggling to defend the noble heritage of our Southern people had they grown weary. The body responded with a resounding

    “No!” I asked them again if they were not tired of the fight to vindicate the Cause of their ancestors; without hesitation, they

    emphatically exclaimed, “No!”

    I then asked them if they were content holding the fort and defending against the constant assault or were they ready to strike

    with an offensive attack. If you were not in the convention hall, allow me to report, you were represented by an enthusiastic

    band of warriors to the Cause that, I am sure, would make our ancestors proud. In short, the idea was wholeheartedly embraced.

    If you were there, then I congratulate you and encourage you to give your highest attention and strongest efforts to the

    following instructions.

    If you were not with us then, then I hope you are with us now. In recent years, the Cause of the Confederacy, indeed the

    cause of American Liberty, has been under attack at an ever-increasing intensity. The bully-club of choice is mainly “slavery”

    with the proposed notion that the invaders from the North left their homes and families, risking mortal danger, on a benevolent

    mission to end the burdensome institution (that was financed and perpetuated to a large degree by their own kith and kin). One

    only needs to study a little history to realize that that nursery-rhyme was far from reality, but facts will never be found in the

    arsenal of the liar.

    The Cause of the South was simply independence and self-determination. The Cause was quelled (not lost). These United

    States were formed as a result of a victorious war of independence and self-determination. Our Confederate ancestors were

    merely continuing the legacy and heritage of that American brand of liberty. But, the liberty ideal did not fit the narrative of

    invasion and usurpation as was perpetrated by Mr. Lincoln and his hosts in the name of “saving the union.” A new and more

    globally palatable excuse was needed—the abolition of slavery. Slavery is indeed the very antithesis of liberty, and what better

    way to one-up the Southern Cause than to claim the mantle of liberty as their

    own—hence all the confusion to this day.

    Our ancestors fought a bloody, internecine war that resulted in the near destruction of a unique people, who then suffered a

    tyrannical military occupation that was designed to reprogram the mind of the South to be more in line with that of the oppressors.

    The surviving Southern veterans of the War came together as the United Confederate Veterans with the intention of setting the story

    straight and educating the country on the truthful aspects of the War. After the shooting had ceased, our ancestors were again at

    war—fighting for the intellectual honesty of that struggle.

    The struggle continues today and is now in the hands of the sons of those venerable men of the Confederacy—that is you

    and me. So, now I must ask you to look into your heart and answer the question that I asked the members in assembly in

    Vicksburg: Are you willing to continue a defensive strategy AND are you ready to engage the enemy in a front-on assault?

    The victors of the War of Northern Aggression distracted their fellow countrymen from the true facts concerning the

    War. They painted a picture of the South as Hades, populated by demons of varying degrees of evil. The leaders of modern

    misinformation needed to provide their doe-eyed minions with a chief-demon, the Devil himself to help explain the depths of

    depravity of the typical Southerner. To them, General Nathan Bedford Forrest fit the bill perfectly. He was a slave trader before

    the War and led the “infamous” assault on Ft. Pillow during the War. They took these truths and twisted them into the vilest and

    most reprehensible actions of a malevolent racist—all with the intention of cutting the legs from under the true story of the

    South.

  • 8

    Today, General Forrest has become the poster-boy for the current propaganda efforts. This must be answered to and must be

    answered to sharply and decisively. Recently, General Forrest’s statue was vandalized in Memphis. In that same city, three

    parks named for Confederates, including General Forrest, have had their names illegally changed. The Forrest bust in Selma has

    been stolen and his grave desecrated. The list of vandalisms is long, but the verbal abuse is seemingly endless. Take a moment

    and search the Internet for info on General Forrest. Over and over erroneous statements are made as if they are well-accepted

    facts.

    On a Glen Beck Show earlier this year an “expert” was on as a guest that showed Beck a sword that the guest declared with

    complete conviction was, “the very sword that Forrest used to skin African-Americans at Ft. Pillow.” The fact that this never

    happened is no concern to those that wish only harm to the South and to poison her history.

    Many pundits have accused General Forrest of being the originator of the KKK, and/or the first grand wizard of the KKK.

    Now let’s get this straight right from the beginning: the SCV carries no water for any hate group including the KKK. We are

    not comfortable even having our name on the same page as theirs. This is why we cannot allow the continued slander of one of

    our most valiant heroes. I refer you to Dr. Michael Bradley’s essay in the July-August issue of the Confederate Veteran

    concerning the true story of General Forrest. The lies cannot beallowed to continue unchallenged! Are you ready to stand up

    and fight for the truth?

    If you are ready then this is what I need you to do:

    Division Commanders—Make sure that each Camp Commander has this letter and understands the order. I have many Camp

    Commander’s email addresses but not all. This is a time sensitive order and requires your attention immediately. Use every

    possible means to get this information out to your Camps. Then collect information on the results of this action and pass the

    information to your Department Commander.

    Camp Commanders—Below you will find a link. Click on this link and follow the instructions to download a folder where

    you will find two pdf files. The link will only be valid until October 7th. Download the files today.

    Once you have downloaded the folder, open it and you will find an advertisement in both vertical and horizontal formats. You

    will have seen this same advertisement in your most recent Confederate Veteran.

    The advertisement is in response to our opposition’s seemingly endless character assassination attempts on General Forrest.

    Theirs is a diversion and a bluff and it is time to force their hand. Follow these simple rules:

    Strategy:

    The purpose of this program is to start a debate, as wide as we are able, to discuss the truth of the South in general and in this

    case, General Forrest in particular. The people that have made these allegations are responsible for the continued divisiveness in

    our country. The proof of their slanderous accusations is their sole responsibility. We must demand that they prove the

    unprovable and therefore expose themselves for what they are.

    You have studied the actions and motives of our ancestors for years. Through the Confederate Veteran essay program you

    have been supplied with the intellectual weapons to fight this fight and win. We enjoy the strength of 30,000 men and nearly

    900 camps. We are prepared. By placing ads in many media outlets at the same time, our efforts will be noticed and more of our

    fellow Southerners will learn of our efforts and we will grow stronger while fulfilling the Charge.

    Tactics:

    Each Camp that is willing to engage in this action is asked to place the advertisement in their local media venues with your

    Camp’s contact info visible. Place it in as many publications as you are able—put it everywhere. Be creative. Print ads work

    better if they are seen more than once, so consider running it for two issues of the same publication. Do this as soon as possible

    so that we will have exposure in as many areas as possible, at the same time. Report to your Division Commander on your

    actions and the results.

    Prepare for the counter attack:

    For this strategy to be successful, we will need a great and concerted effort. If only a few follow through then the media will

    ignore us and the slander and propaganda will continue unabated. If we challenge the lies in mass they can’t afford not to

    engage us.

    When speaking to the media follow these rules closely:

    1. STAY ON POINT! The ad is there to expose the lies.

    2. The pundits in the media are the majorities that exclaim these untruths about General Forrest. Therefore, keep the attention

    on them by saying, “You said it, you prove it.”

    3. If they try to trip you up (and they will try), simply stay on point and challenge them with, “You said it, you prove it.” If they

    try to change the subject to you or the SCV, answer their question with a simple yes or no, then repeat, “You said it, you prove

    it.” Stand your ground and STAY ON POINT! Do not be their tool. This ad is about them and their continued assault on the

    South. They must prove their allegations. If we see success through this endeavour, then we will follow this ad with another

    to dispel more myths concerning our courageous ancestors.

    If you have questions, contact your Division or Department Commander. I wish you all the best and pray for a successful

    campaign of bringing truth into this heated debate and vindicating the cause of the South. Thank you for your devotion to the

    Charge and your work to see that the world knows the true history of the South. I am,

    Respectfully yours,

    Michael Givens

    Commander-in-Chief

  • 9

    BILLY TITUS

    Story submitted by Anthony Eye

    Billy Titus was a New York craftsman who became

    known for the fine plows he could fashion. In fact, one of

    his plows won a silver medal for excellence. This,

    however, is not his story but his son’s. Titus married

    Amira Sabin in 1834. Their fourth child was named Billy

    after his father. Born in 1845, Billy was one of those

    young men of a generation who would not be of age to

    vote until the end of the great Civil War which ripped

    their country apart in 1861. Thousands of them went off to

    war as boys, not men. They came from divided sections of

    the country and many died to test whether there would be

    one country or two.

    The Titus family has no relation to me, yet their story

    reveals how personal that war can become to a reader

    today. I come to know Billy because he picked up a

    Confederate bullet at Gettysburg . His younger brother

    Anson wrote a note and laboriously tied it to the bullet so

    that its story should not be lost. This is what Anson Titus

    wrote so very long ago: “This Minnie ball was picked up on the battlefield of

    Gettysburg by Billy Titus, my brother, and by him carried

    to New York , where he was stationed during the New

    York Riots, and where he was visited by our honored

    parents, and by him given to them, at the time.”

    The next small part of the story is mine. I responded to

    an estate auction listing and bought the bullet. I found it to

    be of Confederate manufacture, a type called a Gardner

    after the man who invented the machinery which was used

    to make it. Gardner bullets had the cartridge paper

    crimped into place. This paper is very fresh for an item a

    century and a half old. I prize the bullet because it

    preserves the immediacy of that titanic grapple between

    two armies. It was dropped where it was by an unknown

    Confederate soldier and picked up by a young Union

    private who put it in his pocket as a souvenir.

    Billy’s regiment was one of several units transferred

    from Gettysburg to New York because of the draft riots

    there. He was able to get word to his parents and they

    made a relatively short journey to visit him. He gave them

    the bullet he carried from Gettysburg . They returned

    home and Billy went on with his regiment. The bullet

    eventually fell into the hands of Billy’s younger brother

    Anson. Thus, the bullet itself, visited two major event

    locations of 1863.

    A reference work published in 1910 tells the next part

    of the story. The Titus family history is part of an account

    of life in Ontario County , New York . It states very

    simply that Billy Titus was killed on May 12,1864 on the

    last day of fighting at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania ,

    Virginia .

    The note, written later by the Rev. Anson Titus, shows

    that the Gettysburg bullet was a cherished memento of the

    lost young brother. Finally, after years of research, I know

    more of the story.

    The Rev. Anson Titus retired from the ministry and

    moved to West Somerville , Massachusetts about 1895.

    Thus, the note with that address stamped did not get made

    until after that date. Both the mother and father were dead

    by that time. Anson was several years younger than Billy so he was

    telling the story of the older brother who went off to war

    and was killed. When Anson said Billy went to New York

    because of the riots, he was only partially correct. That

    presented a difficulty in finding the correct regiment.

    Originally I searched for any regiment which had a

    Billy Titus and went from Gettysburg to New York for

    riot duty. When I found out the Titus family was from a

    New York county I concentrated on the New York

    regiments.

    Phelps , New York and the area around it have been

    well represented in historical and genealogical postings.

    Finally someone posted that Billy had joined the 11th US

    Infantry. That made all the difference in the search. His regiment went through the Peninsular Campaign

    and into the crucible where General John Pope was

    pounded by Stonewall Jackson. Antietam , Fredericksburg

    , and Chancellorsville followed.

    At Gettysburg the 11th supported Chamberlain and the

    20th Maine on July 2, 1863 .

    They were sent, a day later than they should have been

    sent, to pursue Lee. From that failure they were sent to

    New York for three weeks after the riots were over. That

    was when Billy gave the bullet to his parents.

    He was killed at Spotsylvania Courthouse on May 12,

    1864 , the last day of that fight. Seventeen years and a few

    weeks old when the joined in June of 1862, Billy went

    into some of the heaviest battles of the war. An older

    brother had more education, joined later, and served in a

    support regiment.

    Anson Titus died in 1935. Who ended up with the

    bullet and note cannot be determined. I bought it on

    internet auction and lost contact with the seller. He had no

    idea whose property it had been. I did not think of asking

    the location of the physical auction where he bought it.

    Billy Titus picked up the bullet 150 years ago this past

    July. I just learned ten days ago that Anson Titus did not

    move to West Somerville until 1895.

    The seller was unaware that it was a “fresh drop”

    Gardner Confederate bullet. He had no idea that it could

    be traced. Today Billy’s bullet is a highlight of my relic

    collection. I wish his spirit peace, and will think of him

    from time to time.

  • 10

    Kansas Division Color/Honor Guard Available

    Compatriot Gerald V. Spaur of the BG Albert Pike Camp #1439 is suited and ready for the occasion.

    Gerald is prepared for the opportunity to be present as a Color Guard for your event, or to take on the

    responsibility of Honor Guard for the passing of a family member, friend or compatriot where an honorGuard is

    needed.

    Gerald will go anywhere in Kansas and be available for any and all Military services for compatriots, family

    members, and friends. Feel free to contact Gerald at 2947 Walnut

    Wichita Kansas 67217-3128 Phone: 316-524-2555

    TRIVIA ANSWERFOR SEPTEMBER

    What color attire or uniform were the Union and Confederate troops wearing during the battle of 1st Bull Run or Manasas?

    Actually, this one is a little more difficult than most people realize. Typically folks are taught the North wore blue and the South wore grey (and

    butternut if schools are a little more accurate). HOWEVER, uniforms created a bit of confusion early in the war, most noticeably at 1st Bull Run (1st

    Manasas), due to the fact that there was no standardized color when it came to uniform color. At 1st Bull Run (1st Manasas) you had Union troops in

    grey in addition to blue and Confederate troops in blue in addition to grey and butternut.

    TRIVIA FOR OCTOBER

    Who was imprisoned in Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, for five months until October 1865.

    Then In 1866 was elected to the United States Senate by the first legislature convened under the

    new Georgia State Constitution, but was not allowed to take his seat because of restrictions on former

    Confederates.

    CAMP MEETINGS

    GEN. ALBERT PIKE CAMP #1439 MAJOR THOMAS J. KEY CAMP #1920 LOCATION: Egg Crate Cafe, LOCATION: Zarda Bar-B-Q

    8506 W 13th, Suite 150 Wichita, Kansas 67212 11931 W 87th

    St. Lenexa, Kansas.

    DATE: Second (2ND

    ) Saturday each month DATE: First (1st) Thursday each month

    TIME: 11:30 am fellowship 12:30 Meeting TIME: 6:30 pm. fellowship, 7:00pm.

    COLS LEWIS & HARRISON CAMP #1854 SOUTH KANSAS CAMP #2064

    LOCATION: Westside Christian Church, LOCATION: Rockwell Branch Library

    432 SW Lindenwood, Topeka, Kansas. 5939 E 9th

    Street, Wichita, Kansas.

    DATE: Third (3rd

    ) Saturday each Month DATE: Second 2nd

    Thursday each Month

    TIME: 10:00am. TIME: 5:30-7:30pm.

    GEN. LEWIS A. ARMISTEAD CAMP #1847 GEN. WILLIAM STEELE CAMP #1857

    LOCATION: Public Library Tech Conf Ctr. Rm. LOCATION: Bann Thai Restaurant

    301 East Elm, Salina, Ks. 301 S. 4th St., Leavenworth, KS 66048.

    DATE: Second (2nd

    ) Saturday each Month DATE: Second (2nd

    ) Thursday each Month

    TIME 1:00-1:30 fellowship, 1:00-2:30 Meeting TIME: 6:00 pm. Fellowship 7:00 pm.

    BG BUCKNER & CHILTON CAMP #2227

    LOCATION: Cup of Jones

    909 West Wyatt Earp blvd dodge City, Ks.

    DATE: Fourth Monday of Month

    TIME: 1900 hr

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Warren_(Massachusetts)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Harborhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate

  • 11

    The Kansas Division

    Sons of Confederate Veterans

    190 NW Hawthorn St.

    Topeka, Kansas. 66606

    COMPATRIOT