ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH THE PHYSICS OF MOTORSPORTS

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  • Slide 1
  • ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH THE PHYSICS OF MOTORSPORTS
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  • Outline Introduction What is Quantum Racing? Teaching physics through racing Physics of Racing 1-D motion 2-D motion experiments Classroom Activities Turn Radius Gear Ratio Rolling Friction
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  • Part of the Society of Physics Student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Formed to participate in the Grand Prix of BGSU (2 nd annual held April 14 th, 2007) Viewed as an exciting way to learn physics in many different capacities.
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  • What can racing bring to physics? Racing can be an effective and exciting tool in physics education. A Champ Car produces enough downforce at race speeds that it could drive upside down on the ceiling. A Top Fuel Dragster accelerates from 0-335 mph in under 4.4 seconds pulling almost 5 gs.
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  • The Physics of Racing Kinematics Position/velocity/acceler ation relations F=ma 1-D/2-D motion Rotational motion Torque Energy/work Conservation of energy Collisions Linear/Angular Momentum Elasticity Fluids/pressure Thermodynamics Ideal gas law P-V diagrams Entropy Structural Mechanics Beam flexure Center of Mass Weight Transfer
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  • Undergraduate Research Two Parts Day to day working involved with the kart Individual Projects
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  • The Physics of Racing
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  • The turn right before the longest straight is the most important BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing WHY?
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  • 1-D motion [straights] Theory: Application: Being slightly faster into a straight will end in a larger advantage at the end. BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • What does that mean on the track? The time difference for between a car entering at 28 vs 30 mph is: 0.1182 s for 73 feet 0.06 s for 40 feet BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing That means a 5.89 foot advantage for the 73 foot straight -about a kart length and a 3.06 foot advantage for the 40 foot straight -about half a kart length
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  • What is the fastest way to get through a corner? BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • 2-D motion [corners] Theory: Application: Taking the line with the largest radius, will be the fastest BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • Racing Lines BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing Racing lines refers to the variations of paths that a driver can take through a corner.
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  • Variations in speed Obviously the different lines have a difference in radii, and therefore allowed speeds for a given setup. BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing Corner : 75 ft radius at centerline 30 foot track width Line Radii/max velocity (1.1g turn): effective red line 63 feet/32.16 mph effective green line 87 feet/37.79 mph effective blue line 145 feet/48.78 mph Calculations taken from Brian Beckmans Physics of Racing
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  • lead to a variation in time The allowed speed leads directly to fastest times for the different lines. BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing Calculations taken from Brian Beckmans Physics of Racing
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  • track width is also a factor The track width effects the allowed velocities BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing Calculations taken from Brian Beckmans Physics of Racing
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  • Calculations are great but what about the real world? BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • Data Acquisition (DAQ) Alfano Records: RPM Head Temp Wheel Speed G-force Lap times 10 hz ~90 min BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • 1-D experiment Measure both starting and ending velocities as well as the acceleration and distance. BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing IR beacon #2IR beacon #1 Known distance -show relationship and measure s
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  • BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing
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  • 2-D experiment Measure known radius, acceleration, and speed BGSU Physics and AstronomyQuantum Racing r -show relationship and measure c
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