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Engaging Students in Scientific Inquiry through Science Policy · PDF file Engaging Students in Scientific Inquiry through Science Policy Presentation at the Cleveland Regional Council

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  • Engaging Students in Scientific

    Inquiry through Science Policy

    Presentation at the Cleveland Regional Council of Science

    Teachers Meeting

    Drs. Debbie K. Jackson & Robert Ferguson

    Cleveland State University October 24, 2005

  • Goals of the talk

    •  History •  Details of each lesson •  A sample activity from one lesson •  Comments/feedback

  • AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Programs: Vision 2033

    (2005)

    1.  Science and Society’s Futures 2.  Science, Technology, and the Human

    Condition 3.  Science, Technology, and Global Security 4.  Energy, the Environment, and Global

    Change 5.  Linking Science and Policy for Tomorrow’s

    World

  • Lesson Structure

    •  Learning cycle – Engage – Explore – Explain – Extend – Evaluate

  • Lesson One: Genetics

    •  Based on Kenneth F. Schaffner’s talk: Identification of Genes and Disease

    •  Goal: – Realize the importance of politics and

    science working together to solve problems

  • Lesson One: Genetics

    Students will: •  Research various aspects of

    genetically-linked diseases •  Debate issues of heredity versus

    environment concerning diseases •  Discuss social and cultural impacts of

    multiple representation in science •  Develop a position regarding what

    disease(s) should receive public funding for research

  • Lesson Two: The Problem with Detection

    •  Based on the talks of Victor A. Utgoff and George C. Fidas: The Problem with Detection (the local level)

    •  Goals: –  Realize the importance of politics and

    science working together to solve problems. –  Explore which terror threats leave behind a

    detectable signal

  • Lesson Two: The Problem with Detection

    Students will: •  Participate in a simulation •  Create personal philosophy regarding the

    balance between protection of security and protection of civil rights. – Describe the philosophy – Reflect on the philosophy – Revisit and revise the philosophy, if

    necessary •  List different detectors that exist now and

    explain the science from which they operate •  List the threats that have detectable signals

    and explain how those work

  • Lesson Three: The Little Disease that Roared

    •  Based on the talk of Julie Fischer: The little disease that roared.

    •  Goals: –  Consider the factors that governments

    make when considering how to fight a disease and which diseases to fight

  • Lesson Three: The Little Disease that Roared

    Students will: •  Create a flowchart on how to fight

    disease •  Investigate a disease, explain

    how it spreads, and what precautions would need to be taken to contain the disease

    •  Compare and contrast the cost of fighting two important diseases

  • Lesson Four: Energy and the Environment

    •  Based on Neal Lane’s talk: The interrelationships between energy and the environment

    •  Goals: – Students are introduced to the

    interrelationship between energy and the environment through the study of greenhouse gases and global warming

  • Lesson Four: Energy and the Environment

    Students will: • Compare the energy consumption in the United States to other countries • Explain climate changes that are occurring as a result of increased CO2 emissions • Explain global warming and greenhouse gases • Form an opinion about global warming and defend it

  • Lesson Five: Discrepancy between science and

    policy •  Based on a talk given by Neal

    Lane: The discrepancy between science and policy

    •  Goals: – Students realize the impact of social,

    political, and economical forces on science through an investigation of the discrepancy between science and policy

  • Lesson Five: Discrepancy between science and

    policy Students will: •  Develop a list of the top ten problems facing

    humanity •  Compare the class list to the list of a Nobel

    Prize winner, Dr. Rick Smalley •  Compare the list from Dr. Smalley to the

    National Science Foundation funding chart •  Brainstorm reasons for the inconsistencies

    between Dr. Smalley’s list and the NSF funding structure

    •  Explain the influence of social, political, and economical forces on the problems that are addressed at the state and country level

  • Lesson Six: Environmental Change at the

    Chesapeake Bay •  Based on Donald F. Boesch’s talk: The

    Chesapeake Bay •  Goal:

    –  Understand the value of science influencing policy such that science can be part of a political answer and scientists must interact with politicians

  • Lesson Six: Environmental Change at the

    Chesapeake Bay Students will: •  Explain the effect of rising tides •  Write and reflect on the complexities of an

    environmental change •  Research how a major environmental

    change affects various stakeholders •  Investigate the impact of rising tide in and

    around Chesapeake Bay on select groups •  Communicate findings after investigating

    the impact of rising tide on select groups •  Defend a position regarding reaction to an

    environmental change

  • Lesson Seven: Asking Good Questions

    •  Based on the talk given by the Honorable Rush Holt: Asking Good Questions

    •  Goals: – Recognize the value in asking good

    questions helps fight complacency. – Questioning is a democratic process

  • Lesson Seven: Asking Good Questions

    Students will: •  Critique a poorly and a well conceived

    question •  Make observations on either a

    biological or chemical phenomenon •  Create a good question from the

    observation •  Perform an experiment to answer

    their question •  Read a recent article on the types of

    questions in science

  • A Sample Lesson

    The Problem with Detection

  • Access to the Lessons

    At the website: http://academic.csuohio.edu/jackson_d/

    AAASLessons/AAAS.html

    Our email addresses: Dr. Debbie Jackson:

    d.jackson1@csuohio.edu Dr. Robert Ferguson:

    r.l.ferguson1@csuohio.edu

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