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A practical guide to the key global trends and practices that are transforming HR, talent acquisition and management. Building on the success of The Employer Brand, a conceptual introduction to what has now become a well-established concept; this is a practical guide to implementation, drawing on a much wider range of cases and examples. Richard Mosley draws on the significant advances in employer brand practice among leading companies to give managers hands-on advice. He will demonstrate how employer brand thinking can strengthen organisational HR strategy and reinforce HR’s value to the business.

Text of Employer Brand Management_Sample chapter

  • 1EMPLOYERBRANDMANAGEMENT

    Practical Lessons from the Phke]lE^Z]bg`>fiehr^kl

    Richard MosleyBestselling author of The Employer Brand: Bringing the Best of Brand Management to People at Work.

    FREE eChapter

  • 2A practical guide to the key global trends and practices that are transforming HR, talent acquisition and management.Building on the success of The Employer Brand, a conceptual introduction to what has now become a well-established concept; this is a practical guide to implementation, drawing on a much wider range of cases and examples.

    Richard Mosley draws on the significant advances in employer brand practice among leading companies to give managers hands-on advice. He will demonstrate how employer brand thinking can strengthen organisational HR strategy and reinforce HRs value to the business.

    Buy today from your favourite bookshop and online at

  • 2Please feel free to post this

    EMployER BRAnd MAnAgEMEnt

    sampler on your blog or website, or emailit to anyone you think would enjoy it!

    Thank you.

    Extracted from Employer Brand Management: Practical lessons from the worlds leading employers published in 2014 by Capstone Publishing, The Atrium, Southern Gate,

    Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 8SQ. UK. Phone +44(0)1243 779777

    Copyright 2014 Richard Mosley

    All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except under the

    terms of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 or under the terms of a licence issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency, 90 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 4LP, UK, without the permission in writing of the Publisher. Requests to the Publisher should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, The Atrium, Southern Gate,

    Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 8SQ, England, or emailed to permreq@wiley.co.uk.

  • 3Introduction 1

    You can judge a company by the people that it keeps. Great companies attract and keep great talent. Talented people choose to come and choose to stay because they feel their pay and opportunities are better than any other organization they might consider. But for the best companies, there is also an X factor. In the same way that leading companies strive to deliver uniquely valuable products and services, they also seek to shape a distinctive organizational culture and brand identity. The shared behaviours and beliefs that define this culture can deliver significant competitive advantages. A strongly shared sense of culture and purpose can drive extraordinary levels of motivation, loyalty and performance. A crystal-clear focus on a handful of key qualities, like creativity or simplicity or agility, can likewise provide your organization with capabilities that others will find difficult to match. This powerful combination of differentiating capabilities and distinctive cultural identity helps to attract the right kind of talent. It generates employee pride, advocacy and commitment. It also helps you deliver unique products and services. The question is: how do you define the qualities that make your organization special? And, once defined, how do you communicate, shape and measure these qualities? For many of the worlds leading employers, the answer to this question is employer brand management.

    When Simon Barrow and I published The Employer Brand in 2005, there were only a handful of companies applying brand thinking to people management in the integrated way we suggested. The hypothesis was simple. We believed that applying the best of brand management to people at work would bring many of the same benefits that this discipline had brought to the attraction, engagement and retention of customers. There was not a hard and fast business case at the time, but the hypothesis clearly resonated with a great many people. If youre clear and consistent in setting out the benefits of working for your organization, and if you deliver an employment experience in line with these promises, then youre more likely to develop a positive employer brand reputation, and attract, engage and retain the right people. Whether organizations found their own proof for this argument or not, a significant number of leading companies have since adopted some form of employer brand management thinking.

    The war for talent is over, and the talent wonJosh Bersin

  • 4Why the neW book?I have an admission to make. When Simon and I wrote The Employer Brand, we didnt know a great deal about how employer brand management worked in practice. We were experienced in consumer brand management, recruitment advertising, internal marketing and communication, but the more integrated application of these disciplines to employer brand management was largely theoretical. At the time, we found the most advanced application of the thinking (though not necessarily the terminology) at Reuters, care of John Reid-Dodick and Anne Marie Bell, and Tesco, care of David Richardson and David Fairhurst. Since that time, Ive had the privilege of working alongside a considerable number of organizations who have put this thinking into practice, and have learnt a great deal more than I knew, or foresaw, in 2005.

    The environment in which employer brand management now takes place has also changed significantly since the spring of 2005. This was the year that the first video was uploaded to YouTube. Facebook, founded the year previously, was still called The Facebook and had yet to expand beyond university students in the USA and Canada. LinkedIn, founded in 2003, had been around a number of years longer, but was still a long way from hitting its stride. There was no Twitter until March 2006. The growth in importance of these social media channels has had a major effect on the way organizations communicate and it may well have an even greater ongoing influence on the way people work. As Deloitte concludes in its 2014 Human Capital Trends Survey: Tools such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and others are changing recruiting into a strategic function focused on marketing, branding, new tools and technologies. I have made an attempt to capture the most effective current practice in social media marketing, some of the changes this is beginning to bring about in the way people are managed at work, and what appear to be the most significant future trends.

    Why should companIes Invest In employer brand management?Over the last few years, the Boston Consulting Group and World Federation of People Management Associations (WFPMA) have conducted a number of research projects exploring the relationship between people practices and performance advantage. In their 2012 study they surveyed 4288 HR and non-HR managers in 102 countries on their current HR capabilities and strategies, and then compared these findings with the financial performance of each company. Their overall findings confirmed that good people practices confer a performance advantage, but the correlation between specific practices and key measures of business growth were particularly relevant to the contents of this book. As Table 1.1 illustrates, the four most impactful people management practices were either directly (in the case of employer branding) or indirectly (in the case of many organizations approaches to recruitment, on-boarding, retention and talent management) linked to some form of employer brand management.

  • 5table 1.1 the impact of hr capabilities on financial performance

    topic in Which most capable and least capable companies were compared

    the Impact that the most capable companies achieve over the least capable companies in...

    revenuegrowth

    profit margin

    1 delivering on recruiting 3.5 2.0

    2 on-boarding of new hires and retention 2.5 1.9

    3 managing talent 2.2 2.1

    4 Improving employer branding 2.4 1.8

    5 performance management and rewards 2.1 2.0

    6 developing leadership 2.1 1.8

    7 mastering hr processes 1.8 1.8

    8 global people management and international expansion 1.8 1.7

    9 enhancing employee engagement 1.8 1.6

    10 providing shared services and outsourcing hr 1.6 1.7

    Source: 2012 bcg/WFpma proprietary web survey and analysisNote: revenue growth and profit margin are defined as categories in the survey. For analysis, categories are transformed into category means; extreme categories are transformed into -20% or +20%. For each topic, we compared average revenue growth and average profit margin of respondents who chose 5 (high capability) against those who chose 1 (low capability).

    The other factors in this study that demonstrated a lower correlation with performance were: Managing diversity and inclusion; Managing change and cultural transformation; Actively using web 2.0 for HR and managing associated risks; Strategic workforce; Delivering critical learning programs; Managing corporate social responsibility; Transforming HR into a strategic partner; Health and security management; Managing flexibility and labour costs; Restructuring the organization; Managing worklife balance; and Managing an ageing workforce.

    deFInIng employer brandThis is a useful place to start, but in many respects it is frustratingly imprecise. Employer branding represents the most tangible form of employer brand management, representing the consistent application of the brand logo and other elements of visual design to identify and differentiate the brand. However, this represents only one aspect of brand management. Of greater importance is the systemic management of the broader range of elements that shape brand experience and reputation. In oth

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