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    MONITORING OF THE PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT OF

    EDUCATIONS MODEL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    PROGRAM

    Senior High School Modelling: Moving Towards the New K to 12 Curriculum

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    Table of Contents 2

    Philippine Copyright 2014

    SEAMEO INNOTECH

    ISBN XXX-XXX-XXXX-XX-X

    All rights reserved.

    No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or any means

    or stored in a database or retrieval system without prior written permission of SEAMEO

    INNOTECH.

    www.seameo-innotech.org

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    Table of Contents 3

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ 3

    List of Tables ............................................................................................................................... 5

    List of Figures .............................................................................................................................. 7

    List of Acronyms .......................................................................................................................... 8

    Acknowledgement .................................................................................................................... 10

    Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 11

    1. Guidelines/Policies........................................................................................................ 19

    2. Sources of Funds ........................................................................................................... 20

    3. Capacity Building .......................................................................................................... 20

    4. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 21

    5. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 21

    6. SHS Program Management ........................................................................................... 23

    Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 24

    Objectives of the Study .. ........................................................................................................... 29

    Method of Study ....................................................................................................................... 29

    The SHS Curriculum ................................................................................................................... 31

    Core Subjects ........................................................................................................................ 33

    Track Subjects . ...................................................................................................................... 34

    Academic Track ................................................................................................................. 35

    Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track ............................................................................... 37

    Sports Track....................................................................................................................... 38

    Arts and Design Track ........................................................................................................ 38

    General Trends.......................................................................................................................... 40

    A. Pre-implementation Experiences ....................................................................................... 40

    1. Rationale ...................................................................................................................... 41

    2. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 43

    3. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 44

    4. Capacity Development .................................................................................................. 45

    5. Certifications ................................................................................................................ 45

    B. Implementation Experiences ............................................................................................ 46

    1. Inputs ........................................................................................................................... 46

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    List of Tables 4

    2. Processes ...................................................................................................................... 49

    3. Output .......................................................................................................................... 51

    4. Challenges and Potentials ............................................................................................. 52

    C. Recommendations (Moving Towards K-12 Implementation) ............. ....... ....... ............... ... 55

    1. Guidelines/Policies........................................................................................................ 55

    2. Sources of Funds ........................................................................................................... 56

    3. Capacity Building .......................................................................................................... 57

    4. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 57

    5. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 58

    6. SHS Program Management ........................................................................................... 60

    Profiles of Model Senior High Schools ....................................................................................... 61

    A. San Pedro Relocation Center National High School ............................................................ 61

    B. Sangley Point National High School.................................................................................... 70

    C. Bacolod City National High School ..................................................................................... 74

    D. Sum-ag National High School............................................................................................. 81

    E. Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School .................................................... 88

    F. Palo National High School .................................................................................................. 96

    G. Merida Vocational School................................................................................................ 101

    Annex 1: Duration of Pre-University Programs in Southeast Asia ............................................. 110

    Annex 2: List of Key Informants ............................................................................................... 111

    References .............................................................................................................................. 113

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    List of Tables 5

    LIST OF TABLES

    Table 1: General Profile of SHS Model Schools, SY 2012-2013.................................................... 27

    Table 2: SHS Model Schools Specializations................................................................................ 27

    Table 3: List of SHS Model Schools Included in the Monitoring Study.......................................... 31

    Table 4: Proposed SHS Curriculum (2012).................................................................................. 31

    Table 5: SHS Core Subjects......................................................................................................... 34

    Table 6: Common Track Subjects............................................................................................... 35

    Table 7: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - ABM Strand)........................................... 35

    Table 8: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - General Academic Strand)....................... 36

    Table 9: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - HUMSS Strand*)..................................... 36

    Table 10: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - STEM Strand)........................................ 36

    Table 11:Specialized Track Subjects (Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track*)........................... 37

    Table 12: Specialized Track Subjects (Sports Track).................................................................... 38

    Table 13: Specialized Track Subjects (Arts and Design Track)..................................................... 38

    Table 14: Summary of Revised SHS Curriculum (2014)................................................................ 39

    Table 15: List of Selected Model SHS.......................................................................................... 40

    Table 16: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 62

    Table 17: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 63

    Table 18: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 63

    Table 19: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 64

    Table 20: Program Schedule for Grade 11, First Semester.......................................................... 75

    Table 21: Program Schedule for Grade 11, Second Semester...................................................... 75

    Table 22: Program Schedule for Grade 12, First Semester.......................................................... 76

    Table 23: Program Schedule for Grade 12, Second Semester...................................................... 76

    Table 24:Area of Specialization................................................................................................. 76

    Table 25: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 11...................................................... 77

    Table 26: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 12...................................................... 78

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    List of Tables 6

    Table 27: Proposed Curriculum Grade 11................................................................................... 83

    Table 28: Proposed Curriculum for Grade 12.............................................................................. 83

    Table 29: Sum-ag NHS SHS Area of Specialization, Description and Number of Hours................. 84

    Table 30:Additional Competencies inputted by industries......................................................... 84

    Table 31: Class Program of Grade 11......................................................................................... 89

    Table 32: SHS Area of Specialization, Description & Number of Hours........................................ 89

    Table 33:Additional Competencies Inputted by Industries......................................................... 90

    Table 34: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism................ 97

    Table 35: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism................ 97

    Table 36: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism................ 97

    Table 37: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism................ 98

    Table 38: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT........................ 98

    Table 39: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT........................ 98

    Table 40: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT........................ 99

    Table 41: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT........................ 99

    Table 42: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum, SY 2012-2013............................................ 102

    Table 43: Proposed Senior High Curriculum, SY 2012-2013....................................................... 102

    Table 44: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 103

    Table 45: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 103

    Table 46: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013 ................................................. 104

    Table 47: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013 ................................................. 104

    Table 48: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 105

    Table 49: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 105

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    List of Figures 7

    LIST OF FIGURES

    Figure 1: DepEds Enhanced Basic Education Program............................................................... 24

    Figure 2: The K to 12 Graduate.................................................................................................. 25

    Figure 3: Framework of Study.................................................................................................... 30

    Figure 4: Revised Senior High School Curriculum (2014)............................................................. 32

    Figure 5: SHS Core and Track Subjects....................................................................................... 33

    Figure 6: SHS with Indigent/Very Poor Students......................................................................... 41

    Figure 7: SHS with Working Students......................................................................................... 42

    Figure 8: SHS with Overaged Students....................................................................................... 42

    Figure 9: SHS Program Track. .................................................................................................... 45

    Figure 10: Learning Materials Used in SHS................................................................................. 48

    Figure 11: Teaching-Learning Strategies Used in SHS................................................................. 50

    Figure 12: Type of Student Assessment Used in SHS................................................................... 51

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    List of Acronyms 8

    LIST OFACRONYMS

    ABM Accountancy, Business, ManagementADM Alternative Delivery Mode

    APEX Applied Academics for Excellence

    BESRA Basic Education Sector Reform AgendaBPO Business Process Outsourcing

    CHED Commission on Higher Education

    CLIMBS Coop-Life Mutual Benefit Services Association

    COA Commission on Audit

    CSC Civil Service Commission

    DepEd Department of Education

    DMLMNHS Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School

    DO DepEd Order

    DOLE Department of Labor and EmploymentEdukasyon 2Ps Edukasyon Pantulay Pangkabuhayan

    EFA Education for All

    EIM Electrical Installation and MaintenanceERIO Educational Research and Innovation Office(SEAMEO INNOTECH)

    EVSU Eastern Visayas State University

    FBS Food and Beverage ServiceFGDs Focus Group Discussions

    GE General Education

    HE Home Economics

    HEIs Higher Education Institutions

    HESS Humanities, Education, Social Sciences

    HRM Hotel and Restaurant Management

    ICOT-P Income-Creating Opportunities thru Technology Projects

    ICT Information and Communications Technology

    IETI International Electrical and Technical Institute

    IRR Implementing Rules and Regulations

    KASVs Knowledge, Attitude, Skills, and Values

    KIIs Key Informant Interviews

    LET Licensure Examination for Teachers

    LGUs Local Government Units

    LNU Leyte Normal UniversityLTLDPC Leyte Technology Livelihood Development Productivity Center

    MAPEH Music, Arts, Physical Education, and HealthMBCCI Metro Bacolod Chamber of Commerce and IndustriesMOA Memorandum of Agreement

    MOOE Maintenance and Other Operating Expenses

    National Certificate National Certificate

    NHS National High School

    NORIA Negros Organic Rice Industry Association

    NSSC Naval Sea System Command

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    List of Acronyms 9

    NSTP National Service Training Program

    OCCI Metro Ormoc Credit Cooperative, Inc.OHSP Open High School ProgramOISCA Organization for Industrial, Spiritual, and Cultural Advancement

    OJT On-the-job Training

    PCCI Philippine Call Center Institute

    PD Presidential Decree

    PEIs Private Educational Institutions

    PESO Public Employment Service OfficePNP Philippine National Police

    PRC Professional Regulations Committee

    Project EASE Project Effective Alternative Secondary Education

    PUP Polytechnic University of the Philippines

    RA Republic ActRBEC Revised Basic Education Curriculum

    RPL Recognition of Prior Learning

    RSU Research Studies Unit

    (SEAMEO INNOTECH, under ERIO)SARDOs Students at Risk of Dropping Out

    SBM School-Based ManagementSEAMEO INNOTECH Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organization

    Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology

    SEAU Solutions Evaluation and Adaptation Unit

    (SEAMEO INNOTECH, under ERIO)

    SHS Senior High School

    SMAW Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    SPRCNHS San Pedro Relocation Center National High School

    STEM Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics

    STVEP Strengthened TechVoc Education ProgramTESDA Technical Education and Skills Development Authority

    TechVoc Technical-Vocational

    TLE Technology and Livelihood Education

    TR Training Regulations

    TVET Institutions Technical Vocational Educational Training Institutions

    TVL Technical-Vocational-Livelihood

    TWG Technical Working Groups

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    Acknowledgement 10

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

    Our deepest gratitude goes to the Department of Education (DepEd), Bureau of

    Secondary Education under the former leadership of Dr. Lolita Andrada for providing the

    overall direction, context and expectations of DepEd about the Senior High School

    Modelling Program.

    The Center significantly extends its gratitude to the school principals, teachers, students,

    parents of the seven SHS model schools included in this monitoring study for sharing

    their experiences, achievements and challenges during the first year of implementation.

    This report was prepared under the general guidance of SEAMEO INNOTECH Center

    Director Ramon C. Bacani, and Educational Research and Innovation Office Manager

    Philip J. Purnell. Led by Senior Specialist Yolanda C. De Las Alas, the research team

    include Lauren Nerisse S. Bautista, Senior Associate, Eugene L. Tecson, Project Research

    Associate, and Rhio DC Dilag, Program Assistant. Special thanks goes to Ms. Evelyn D.

    Juan for copy editing the report.

    We salute all the SHS learners, especially including those who have successfully

    graduated from the program and now enjoying the fruits of their hardwork in their

    chosen careers.

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    Executive Summary 11

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    In early 2013, the Solutions Evaluation and Adaptation Unit (SEAU) under the

    Educational Research and Innovation Office (ERIO) of the Southeast Asian Ministers of

    Education Organization Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology(SEAMEO INNOTECH)1undertook a monitoring study to document the developments on

    the first year of implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling in selected

    SHS model schools in the country. The research study was funded through SEAMEO

    INNOTECHs Educational Research and Innovation Fund as part of the Centers

    complimentary set of program interventions to support the Department of Education

    (DepEd)s need for sustained technical support in operationalizing the new K to 12 Basic

    Education Program.

    The study aimed to generate knowledge drawn from the experiences of model schools

    that can serve as a good resource for refining the guidelines for the full implementation of

    SHS beginning SY 2016-2017. Specifically, the study aimed to 1) determine the pre-implementation considerations, and actual implementation needs and processes under

    the SHS Modeling; 2) identify strengths and innovations of the selected SHS model

    schools; 3) ascertain challenges and potentials for improvement; and 4) formulate policy

    recommendations based on the lessons learned by the selected SHS model schools.

    Key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with

    school heads, teachers and SHS students to obtain relevant information on the SHS

    Modeling. Included in the monitoring study are four general public high schools,

    namely, 1) Sangley Point National High School (NHS) in Sangley Point, Cavite City,

    Cavite; 2) Bacolod City NHS; 3) Sum-ag NHSin Bacolod City, Negros Occidental; and 4)

    Palo NHS in Palo, Leyte; and three public technical-vocational (TechVoc) high schools,namely, 5) San Pedro Relocation Center NHSin San Pedro, Laguna; 6) Doa Montserrat

    Lopez Memorial NHSin Silay City, Negros Occidental; and 7) Merida Vocational School

    in Merida, Leyte.

    The study also utilized data generated from a survey administered by the Research

    Studies Unit (RSU) of SEAMEO INNOTECH. The survey, conducted from February to

    March 2013, was part of a research project that aimed to generate case studies of

    Alternative Delivery Mode (ADM) models in selected provinces of the Philippines that

    would allow for deeper understanding of the implementation of appropriate and

    effective ADMs for the SHS stage of the K to 12 program.

    A review of related literature was also conducted to provide contextual background to

    the study.

    1SEAMEO INNOTECH is one of the three (3) SEAMEO regional centers hosted by the Government of the

    Philippines (GOP).

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    Executive Summary 12

    General Findings

    The general findings of the monitoring study paid attention to pre-implementation and

    implementation experiences of the seven SHS model schools. Challenges and

    recommendations were likewise drawn from the experiences of the schools in SHS

    Modeling.

    A. Pre-Implementation Experiences

    Based on the data obtained from the KIIs and FGDs conducted, the seven schools

    engaged in SHS Modeling to contribute to achieving Education for All (EFA). Particularly,

    the schools aim to provide poor, working, and mostly overaged students greater access

    to senior high school education while they are unable to enroll in college. These schools

    also envisioned to strengthen the employability of the SHS students through the

    provision of quality education.

    Initially, the SHS model schools consulted the academe, labor-related government

    agencies, industry partners, and local government units (LGUs) in preparation for the

    SHS Modeling implementation. They sought technical support from DepEd from the

    central office down to the division level, the Commission on Higher Education (CHED),

    and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to determine the specialization that they could

    engage in and to help develop their curriculum and other academic requirements.

    On the other hand, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), Technical

    Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), and the industry partners oriented

    them on labor market, the career pathways that they could offer and focus on, and the

    training, capacity building, and certification requirements to strengthen the

    employability of SHS students. For example, TechVoc schools usually provided National

    Certificate (NC) I for junior high school and NC II for senior high school which can beobtained by passing the assessment tests administered by TESDA.

    At the same time, the SHS model schools met with either provincial or city/municipal

    LGUs recognizing their key role as links to the industries as well as for the financial and

    logistical support they can provide to help sustain the SHS implementation.

    Partnerships of the SHS model schools with industries depended on the type of

    specialization that they engage in. The specialization offered by the schools depended

    on various considerations such as the type of industries and economic/business

    activities that are prevalent in their area, the type of jobs that the industries require, and

    the capacity of the school itself to undertake such career pathway offering.

    Partnerships with industries were formalized through a Memorandum of Agreement

    (MOA). The signed MOAs explained the nature of the K to 12 Program, the objectives of

    SHS Modeling, and the roles and responsibilities of each party related to the

    implementation of SHS Modeling.

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    The school heads and teachers were oriented and trained on the K to 12 Program and

    SHS Modeling. Most of the teachers were either holders of a Masters degree or had

    completed a number of Masters degree units. In some SHS model schools, the teachers

    conducted their own research studies to build their capacities and enrich the learning

    materials that they use.

    The LGUs and industries partners were likewise oriented on the K to 12 Program and

    SHS Modeling to ensure their awareness of their roles and responsibilities in the

    modeling program.

    B. Implementation Experiences

    The success or failure of the SHS Modeling depended on a number of factors including

    human resources, funding, facilities, curriculum, learning modules, and guidelines or

    policies. Intervention programs, teaching methodologies, and student assessment were

    also identified as crucial in sustaining the program.

    1.

    Inputs

    a.

    Human Resources, Funds, and Facilities

    Different SHS model schools have different human resource and other resource

    requirements depending on their program strategies.

    Teachers that are hired for SHS teaching are often either holders of a Masters degree or

    have completed a number of Masters degree units. While some schools employ SHS

    teachers from their own faculty roster, other schools tap teachers from HEIs or trainers

    from their industry partners.

    Given that the school head is busy in overseeing the school s day-to-day operations and

    the teachers are already swamped with their teaching load, some SHS model schools

    hire a full-time industry coordinator to assist in tapping prospective industry partners,

    coordinate on-the-job training (OJT) of the students, and facilitate job placement of SHS

    graduates.

    Only two of the seven SHS model schools interviewed were given PhP 1 million each by

    the DepEd for SHS Modeling since they were part of the original pilot schools. They were

    able to use the said fund to purchase school facilities and equipment. The rest of the SHS

    model schools did not receive the same funds because they were only identified later.

    Since the program is still in its modeling stage, these schools are unable to coverexpenses for their SHS modeling through their regular fund for maintenance and other

    operating expenses (MOOE).

    As it is, most of the SHS model schools make use of whatever resources or facilities that

    the schools have. For instance, some schools alternate the use of classrooms for junior

    high school (first to fourth year) and senior high school (Grades 11 and 12) students. One

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    school even uses its computer laboratory to hold classes for SHS. In some cases,

    teachers had to shoulder some expenses of students.

    To help augment their financial requirements, the schools sought assistance from

    government officials, LGUs, or industry partners.

    b.

    Curriculum

    The SHS model schools implement a curriculum that they developed in consultation with

    DepEd, CHED, HEIs and industry partners.

    Most of the SHS model schools follow a common academic curriculum, with a few

    additional subjects that are relevant to the specializations the schools offer, such as

    TechVoc or entrepreneurship courses. They align the curriculum with the General

    Education subjects in college to prepare the SHS students for possible entry to second or

    third year college.

    The curriculum includes core subjects such as English, Filipino, mathematics, science,

    social studies, and music, arts, physical education, and health (MAPEH). Two new

    subjects, literature and philosophy, were added based on the General Education

    curriculum of CHED.

    The SHS model schools covered four areas: 1) Entrepreneurship/Business; 2) Technical-

    Vocational; 3) Humanities (Sports, Arts, Music, Languages, Journalism); and 4) Science,

    Technology, and Engineering.

    Students specializing in entrepreneurship or TechVoc can take the National Certification

    (NC) II exams administered by the TESDA which they can use in applying for jobs.

    c.

    Learning Modules

    As of SY 2012-2013, no instructional materials had been developed by the DepEd for SHS

    Modeling. To compensate, the SHS model schools used: 1) printed modules or digitized

    resources (83%); 2) printed text or workbooks (67%); and 3) online resources (50%).

    d.

    Guidelines or Policies

    Among the governing policies used by the SHS model schools in relation to the K to 12

    Program and SHS Modeling are 1) DepEd Order (DO) No. 36 s. 2012 entitled, Guidelines

    on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling in SelectedTechnical and Vocational and General Secondary Schools under the K to 12 Basic

    Education Program; 2) DO No. 71 s. 2012 entitled, Additional Information to and

    Changes in DepEd Order No. 36, S. 2012; and Presidential Decree (PD) No. 42, as

    amended, entitled, A Decree Instituting a Labor Code thereby Revising and

    Consolidating Labor and Social Laws to Afford Protection to Labor, Promote Employment

    and Human Resources Development and Insure Industrial Peace based on Social Justice,

    particularly its provisions on apprenticeship with business organizations.

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    Executive Summary 15

    In the case of Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS, they made use of DO No. 48 s.

    2007 to be able to hire contractual teachers to help address the lack of teachers. The

    said department order authorizes TechVoc school heads to hire contractual teachers.

    2. Processes

    a.

    Intervention programs for disadvantaged learners and/or students at risk of

    dropping out (SARDOs)

    The SHS model schools employ various intervention programs depending on the needs

    of disadvantaged learners and/or SARDOs. In some cases, local officials offer scholarship

    programs to deserving students. There is also the adopt-a-child program for teachers

    who can afford to support a student. The schools also employ the Open High School

    Program (OHSP) to address the constraints of some students in attending daily classes.

    Learning materials used under such arrangements include modules or workbooks. Some

    SHS model schools also implement feeding, health, and nutrition programs. In addition,

    the school encourages parents to support their students whenever possible.

    b.

    Teaching Methodologies

    The SHS model schools apply various learning strategies and approaches depending on

    their preferences and the needs of the SHS students. Face-to-face teaching, media-

    assisted teaching and work-oriented teaching are the most commonly employed

    teaching strategies; of the seven schools, six (86%) identified at least one of these three

    as part of their teaching methodology. Five schools (71%) mentioned using flexible

    learning, group or cooperative learning, or process-oriented learning. Three schools

    (43%) have individualized learning methods.

    Except for the Bacolod City NHS, which only uses face-to-face learning, all other schools

    use a combination of two or more teaching strategies. The Doa Montserrat Memorial

    NHS employs all strategies mentioned above, including pure web-based learning.

    c.

    Student Assessment

    The RSU survey showed that all seven SHS model schools make use of the traditional

    type of assessment for SHS students. Next to this, 71.42 percent said that they conduct

    performance assessment to evaluate the students. On the other hand, 57.14 percent

    mentioned that they use either portfolio or self-assessment in assessing the SHS

    students.

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    3.

    Output

    a. Innovations

    Among the innovations disclosed during the interviews are the following:

    1)

    Establishing a strong and sustained partnerships with LGUs, industries, and

    HEIs to help provide the needed assistance for the Program;

    2)

    Undergoing on-the-job (OJT) training programs as early as Grade 11 to

    accommodate all students and prevent congestion of trainees at the end of

    the SHS term;

    3)

    Screening of incoming SHS students through qualification tests, scholastic

    grades and interviews;

    4) Making the school accessible to indigent students by strictly implementing a

    zero collectionpolicy;

    5)

    Giving consideration and flexible timeframe to students who are deployed in

    OJT program to comply with requirements; ICT was likewise used for

    consultation;

    6)

    Using real life scenarios, skill-oriented learning and treating students as

    adults to motivate and challenge them to do well in school;

    7) Designating a teacher as industry coordinator, one who had been in the

    industry for a long time to facilitate the OJT program of the students;

    8)

    Encouraging SHS teachers to earn a Masters degree or units, have a NC LevelII, or attend TESDA training programs and competency assessment;

    9)

    Encouraging SHS teachers to conduct action research and develop their own

    instructional materials to help enrich existing instructional materials;

    10) Hiring contractual teachers to help mitigate the lack of teachers; and

    11)

    Providing laboratory access for SHS students through the Public Employment

    Service Office (PESO) to augment the schools limited resources.

    b. Student Tracking

    The SHS model schools are yet to develop a system of tracking since all of their SHS

    students are only in Grade 11.

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    Executive Summary 17

    Challenges and Potentials

    The interviews with the seven SHS model schools revealed that SHS Modeling has a

    number of challenges and potentials with respect to guidelines or policies, resources and

    LGU and parental support, awareness, and linkages.

    A.

    Guidelines/Policies

    One of the challenges raised with respect to guidelines in the hiring of teachers is the

    continued implementation of the Localization Law, which prevents schools from hiring

    qualified teachers.

    In the case of SHS model schools that offer call center service as a specialization, they

    are faced with the fact that call centers do not allow on-the-job training (OJT) for

    prospective call center agents and technical support staff. Instead, they only provide

    training for personnel that they have initially screened for hiring.

    Another challenge in terms of guidelines is that in some SHS model schools, Grade 11

    students are not required to join extracurricular activities.

    One area of potential or opportunity related to policy is DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series

    of 2007 which authorizes TechVoc principals to hire contractual teachers.

    B. Resources

    Many challenges and concerns raised by the SHS model schools were related to

    resources. These resource-based challenges and concerns include the following:

    1)

    TESDA examination fee for National Certification (e.g., PhP 550 examination feeper student, uniforms and other paraphernalia required by TESDA in the case of

    NC exam for security services as noted by Sangley Point NHS)

    2)

    Transportation cost of students who are undergoing their OJT programs

    3) Accommodation expenses of students who need to stay near their workplaces

    for their OJT programs

    4)

    Cost of insurance premium for SHS students who are undergoing their OJT

    programs

    5)

    Some of the SHS students do not have their own classroom.

    6) In some SHS model schools, there is insufficient number of computer units for

    SHS students.

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    Executive Summary 18

    7)

    Since SHS is to be fully implemented only starting in 2016, some of the SHS

    model schools have no budgetary allocation from its MOOE for SHS Modeling.

    This situation forces the teachers to personally pay for some of the students

    requirements for the SHS Program.

    C. LGU support

    Based on the interviews and the survey research, LGUs may provide various types of

    support to SHS model schools such as infrastructure support, financial assistance,

    technical assistance including provision of computer laboratory training, and advocacy

    and promotion. While the SHS model schools are able to access such support from LGUs,

    they are constrained under COA regulations to purchase equipment/gadgets with a

    value not exceeding PhP 10,000.

    D. Parental support

    Parents, based on the findings of the study, may help address students concerns, help

    motivate students, provide financial support, and assist in advocacy and promotion of

    the SHS Modeling Program.

    E. Awareness

    Since the SHS Modeling Program employs a stakeholder approach in its implementation,

    awareness building and promotion of the Program may be done in a collaborative way

    among the school, the LGUs, the industry partners, the HEIs, the parents, and the

    students.

    F. Linkages

    One of the challenges with respect to linkages was on the possible mismatch between

    specialization and labor demand, particularly agriculture or crop production as a

    specialization. Sum-ag NHS explained that with their consultations with HEIs and

    industry groups, they do not see much potential in crop production in helping SHS

    students obtain jobs. They said that agriculture in their area seems to be declining in

    terms of importance and job demand.

    On the other hand, there is a lot of potential in fostering linkages between SHS model

    schools and industries especially if the partnerships end up as being mutually beneficial

    for them.

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    Recommendations

    The following are the recommendations based on the findings of the study:

    1. Guidelines/Policies

    1.1

    San Pedro Relocation Center NHS recommended amending the Localization Law inthe hiring of teachers so SHS model schools will be able to hire qualified teachers.

    Section 1 of Republic Act (RA) No. 8190 or the Localization Act 0f 1996 entitled, AN

    ACT GRANTING PRIORITY TO RESIDENTS OF THE BARANGAY, MUNICIPALITY OR

    CITY WHERE THE SCHOOL IS LOCATED, IN THE APPOINTMENT OR ASSIGNMENT OF

    CLASSROOM PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS provides that, In the appointment or

    assignment of teachers to public elementary and secondary schools, priority shall

    be given to bona fide residents of the barangay, municipality, city or province

    where the school is located: Provided, That the teacher possesses all the minimum

    qualifications for the position as required by law.

    1.2

    It is recommended that regional/division ranking of teachers be done based ontime requested by the school. The Professional Regulations Committee (PRC)

    should provide temporary assignment of new graduates of science, mathematics,

    technology and engineering courses who are qualified to teach in SHS since they

    have the newest/latest technology inputs. The need for a policy on hiring teachers

    for provisional appointment was identified. However, for those teaching in TLE, the

    NC qualification and industry experience should be highlighted. Industry experts

    and university professors should be allowed to teach part-time in SHS.

    1.3

    It is recommended that the designation or hiring of industry coordinators for SHS

    model schools be institutionalized. Industry coordinators can help significantly in

    coordinating with existing industry partners and in tapping additional industrypartners. They can also assist the students in the preparation and conduct of their

    OJTs, particularly in contracting on OJT terms, providing for

    mobility/transportation of OJTs, scheduling of assessment and monitoring of OJTs.

    1.4

    It is suggested that senior high schools adopt the following considerations in

    selecting specialized TechVoc programs:

    Availability of basic technical facility and resources needed to teach and train

    students;

    Availability of instructors-trainers who have the necessary competencies,

    education and training to teach the technology;

    Integration of a strong career guidance program to guide the students inselecting their preferred specialized track/electives;

    Availability of funds for the operating expenses of the school and supplemental

    funds particularly for TechVoc high schools;

    Enhancement of the job or trade to attract students to consider it as their

    career; and

    Identification of one or two jobs that can be readily offered by the schools as a

    pilot program/course.

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    1.5

    It is suggested that conflicts in policy issues be addressed. While the Civil Service

    Commission (CSC) rules that students should be in school for eight hours, SHS

    students are required to have two hours of paper work/OJT outside of their

    schools. This seems to violate the CSC rule. Policies which can be addressed by the

    Legal Office of DepEd were already brought up to the Regional/Division Offices.

    However, as of date, a resolution is yet to be taken by school authorities.

    2. Sources of Funds

    2.1

    Sufficient budgetary support for the provision of additional classrooms, training

    facilities for hands-on activities and equipment such as LCD projectors and laptops,

    and learning materials of the SHS students should be made available. This can be

    done by increasing the allocated funds from Maintenance and Other Operating

    Expenses (MOOE), providing TechVoc Funds which is usually at PhP 1 million per

    school, or requesting for financial or in-kind support from Local Government Units

    (LGUs) or the business sector.

    2.2 It is recommended that assessment fees for TESDA should be shouldered by the

    School Division and not by schools. OJT should be covered by TESDA if the school is

    given the fiscal autonomy to encourage students to undergo industry immersion.

    2.3 It is further recommended that GAA funds disbursement be released directly to

    schools and not through several channels. Effective 2013, the new DepEd Memo

    Order stipulates that K to 12 funds will have to be downloaded from the Regional

    Office and Schools Division to TESDA before it goes to the school level.

    3. Capacity Building

    3.1

    There is a need to provide skills training to build the capacities of SHS teachers.

    These training programs include TESDA training for the specialization subjects that

    they will teach, in-school training and orientation sessions on new curriculum for

    academic subject and career pathway teachers, and leadership training for schools

    heads and SHS/industry coordinators on how to properly administer and

    implement SHS Modeling. They should also be given scholarship opportunities by

    TESDA to improve their technical competencies and their perspectives/styles in

    teaching SHS students.

    3.2

    Enhancement training for guidance counselors on Career Preparation and

    Counseling should also be conducted. In this way, the guidance counselor wouldhave the necessary knowledge and capacity to advise SHS students on proper

    career preparation.

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    Executive Summary 21

    4. Linkages

    4.1

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships between the academe, the industries, and national

    and local government institutions should be encouraged and promoted. Building

    strong linkages provides access to accredited Technical Vocational Educational

    Training Institutions (TVET) trainers, equipment and facilities, workshops, training,

    and seminars, resource materials, etc. At the same time, the partnerships can help

    mobilize financial and other related resources needed to sustain SHS Program

    implementation. Moreover, requirements for learner assessment and

    qualifications can be addressed through the partnerships fostered. Working

    together with HEIs provides clarity and direction in the needed academic subjects

    and types of assessments for learners in order for SHS students to be at least at par

    with freshmen and sophomore college students. Developing the curriculum hand-

    in-hand with TESDA helps spell out the requirements for career pathway

    qualifications to improve the chances of SHS graduates in getting jobs.

    4.2 There is a need to come up with innovative partnerships with LGUs and other

    related government or private agencies that would help subsidize transportation

    costs, rent fees, testing fees, and uniform and paraphernalia.

    5. Curriculum Development

    5.1

    Incorporate a strong career guidance component in the curriculum, coupled with

    ardent counseling from the Guidance/SHS Counselor, beginning at Year 10, to guide

    students in selecting their preferred specialized track/electives.

    5.2

    SHS model schools in coordination with the DepEd, CHED and other HEIs, and

    TESDA should work together to review the planned SHS curriculum and incorporate

    lessons learned from its SHS Modeling experience. There is a need for greaterflexibility in the implementation of the said curriculum, particularly in adopting

    General Education (GE) subjects from college, hiring of SHS teachers, trainers from

    industry partners and coordinators, allowing academic subjects to be credited in

    college, and using flexible delivery options (such as modules for OHSP) for students

    who cannot attend school regularly due to work commitments. As recommended

    by some of the SHS model schools, flexible time may be applied, for example, to

    self-paced working students to allow them to complete their academic

    requirements. Learners and instructors may meet once or twice a week as they may

    agree on.

    5.3

    Best practices of SHS model schools with respect to curriculum development shouldbe adopted. This includes aligning academic subjects with knowledge relevant to

    career pathways, utilizing general education subjects from college, maximizing

    options for dual credit in partnership with HEIs and TESDA, and providing ample

    number of units and hours needed to complete the core and specialized learning

    areas.

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    Executive Summary 22

    5.4

    Technical-Vocational skills alignment should be subject to labor market priorities

    and not driven by supply. Schools might overlook the importance of checking

    whether TechVoc programs could address the labor requirements of the community

    and simply ensure that the graduates could contribute to the local economy. As

    such, schools may be producing skilled graduates but there may not be enough

    business enterprises to employ them in within the community. This may result in

    underemployment and school-industry mismatch, which may lead to manpower

    displacement and migration of graduates for employment in other communities.

    5.5 SHS students should be given more exposure to hands-on learning activities to

    facilitate skills development and application of knowledge, attitude, skills, and

    values (KASVs).

    5.6 School-community partnerships should be considered as a viable option for SHS

    Program implementation. This means that SHS can be implemented through flexible

    delivery options such as OHSP, particularly by tapping community resources. For

    instance, Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS explained that a SHS student

    taking Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I can use in his project a neighbor s welding

    machine, and the teacher can then evaluate the project completed. On the other

    hand, Sum-ag NHS is contemplating on establishing partnerships with other

    barangays where their SHS students from distant areas can do farming practicum.

    And in Palo National High School, the school partnered with the provincial

    government for the provision of financial and technical assistance to SHS students

    and to provide funding support for the SHS faculty.

    5.7

    Given that many SHS students will need to spend time contributing to their families,

    priority flexible learning opportunities through self-instructional materials are

    encouraged. Students could study auxiliary subject matter via self-instructional

    modules and only report to school periodically for practical activities (e.g.,laboratory work in science), skills training and completion of assessment tasks. This

    would reduce the strain on SHS classroom-based facilities. Experiences of these SHS

    model schools that also integrated its OHSP into their SHS Program should be

    carefully studied for possible replication and upscaling.

    5.8 Students should be given access to insurance services (i.e., PHILHEALTH, Coop-Life

    Mutual Benefit Services Association or CLIMBS of Metro Ormoc Credit Cooperative,

    Inc. or OCCI) to secure their protection for their mobility during the dual training

    program, apprenticeship, or job immersion program.

    5.9

    Learner assessment and certification maximize links with TESDA certificatemechanism and also HEIs for cross credit recognition and recognition of prior

    learning (RPL). The ladderized curriculum of the K to 12 Program makes it more

    crucial for SHS Schools to closely work together with TESDA to ensure that the SHS

    students will be able to complete their career pathway competencies and

    certification. At the same time, collaboration with the HEIs facilitates the crediting

    of SHS academic subjects in preparation for the SHS studentsentry to college.

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    Executive Summary 23

    5.10

    The formation of Technical Working Groups (TWGs) and the conduct of

    consultations should be sustained because these provide guidance and areas for

    cooperation in sustaining SHS Program implementation.

    5.11

    DepEd, in partnership with TESDA and DOLE, should draft different training

    regulations for the K to 12 SHS program. As a policy, every school should identify

    its field of specialization in at least four trades to allow students to focus on their

    career choice.

    5.12 SHS model schools should focus on work readiness values and attitudes since

    these are priority requirements of business and industries. The importance of

    these soft work readiness skills should be highlighted in the curriculum.

    5.13 Limit the TLE programs for Grades 7 to 10 from 23-24 TLE programs to two

    specialized programs by the end of Junior HS and two to three specializations for

    SHS students.

    6. SHS Program Management

    6.1 Application of school-based management (SBM) approach (DepEd Order No. 48) will

    provide the school with greater autonomy to manage its SHS program based on the

    needs of business community. The success of SHS program lies in the political will of

    the school principal to implement education reforms. But the school policies (i.e.,

    Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda or BESRA) are not truly decentralized to

    allow the schools to have some flexibility in conducting regular classes for SHS (e.g.,

    ADM application such as Open High School Program). Also, the practice of

    reshuffling school principals is not necessary if the school head is performing well.

    6.2

    It is recommended that monitoring of SHS be done by the Schools Division so thatthey would know whats happening in SHS modeling; however, they currently have

    no specialized staff to do it.

    6.3 In reality, not all public secondary schools can offer SHS. As a macro strategy for SHS

    implementation, the 140 TechVoc schools should first be strengthened to enable

    them to lead and guide the 40,000 public secondary schools as they serve as model

    schools or training centers for SHS. DepEd should allocate funding to model SHS

    schools to build their capacities as leader schools in every region before the SHS is

    done massively by 2016. If possible, there should be at least one SHS model school

    per province or one high school offering the SHS program in every municipality.

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    Introduction 24

    INTRODUCTION

    The Philippine Department of Education (DepEd) is currently undertaking a series of

    major reforms anchored on the implementation of a new K-12 system as it seeks to

    improve basic education outcomes for Filipino children and achieve its nationalEducation for All commitments. The new K-12 Basic Education Program2 (Figure 1)

    involves the introduction of a new 12-year basic education curriculum, plus a year of

    mandatory kindergarten, benchmarked on international standards3. The 12-year

    curriculum includes six years of elementary education (Grades 1 to 6), four years of

    junior high school (Grades 7 to 10), and two years of senior high school (Grades 11 to 12)

    marked with multiple pathways and elective subjects supported by a comprehensive

    career guidance program.4

    Figure 1:DepEds Enhanced Basic Education Program

    Source: Department of Education, February 2014

    2The Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013 (Republic Act 10533) was signed in May 2013.3The Philippines, prior to the K-12 reform agenda, was the only country in Asia and one of the only three

    countries in the world (together with Djibouti and Angola in Africa) with a 10-year pre-university program.

    See Annex 1.4SEAMEO INNOTECH Technical Support Program for the Philippine Department of Education K-12 Reform

    Agenda

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    Introduction 25

    With the addition of the multifaceted curriculum to be offered in senior high school,

    graduates are expected to holistically develop and possess these 21stcentury skills:

    1.

    Information, media and technology skills visual and information literacies;

    media literacy; basic, scientific, economic, and technological literacies; and

    multicultural literacy and global awareness

    2.

    Learning and innovation skills creativity and curiosity; critical thinking, problem

    solving and risk-taking; adaptability, managing complexity and self-direction; and

    higher order thinking and sound reasoning

    3.

    Effective communication skills teaming, collaboration and interpersonal skills;

    personal, social and civic responsibility; and interactive communication

    4.

    Life and career skills flexibility and adaptability; initiative and self-direction;

    social and cross-cultural skills; productivity and accountability; and leadership

    and responsibility

    A K to 12 graduate (Figure 2) will be ready to take on higher education or middle level

    skills development, or enter the world of entrepreneurship or employment.

    Figure 2: The K to 12 Graduate

    Source: SEAMEO INNOTECH, 2012

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    Introduction 26

    In anticipation of the full implementation of SHS starting June 2016, DepEd has

    undertaken the Senior High School Modeling Programor SHS Modelingbeginning SY

    2012-2013.

    The Guidelines on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling5

    provides that prior to the implementation of the senior high school, a research and

    development process will be explored by implementing a Senior High School Modeling

    Program in selected public technical-vocational (TechVoc) and general secondary

    schools as participants or model schools ahead of the projected nationwide

    implementation of the SHS in 2016-2017. The modeling started in June 2012 for selected

    model high schools (Grades 11). The enrollees were the fourth year high school (Grade

    10) completers of SY 2011-2012.

    The implementing guidelines (D.O. No. 36 s. 2012) further indicate the following

    objectives:

    1. introduce and prepare the concerned model schools for the implementation of

    the Grades 11 and 12 through the provision of appropriate interventions, e.g.,

    training of teachers, and provision of support facilities and instructional

    materials;

    2.

    generate actual learning experiences of the different participating/volunteer

    secondary schools in order to come up with different modalities as vital inputs in

    the implementation of the SHS; and

    3.

    prepare and carry out the communication plan to generate support from the

    media, civil society, academe, local government units (LGUs), and private sectors.

    Technical support for the SHS Modeling was provided by SEAMEO INNOTECH indeveloping a sustainable model for Grades 11 to 12 by evolving a comprehensive

    education system linking education tiers with businesses and industries, and by drawing

    from the innovative work completed under the Centers Applied Academics for

    Excellence (APEX) project experience. The Center assisted selected DepEd Regional

    Offices in modeling the senior high school program through adaptation of existing APEX

    models.

    5DepEd Order (D.O.) No. 36 series of 2012: Guidelines on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High

    School (SHS) Modeling in Selected Technical and Vocational Education and General Secondary Schools

    under the K to 12 Basic Education Program

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    Introduction 27

    DepEd identified selected schools to be part of the modeling program based on a set of

    criteria. Prior to modeling, a school must have the following:

    1.

    an established post-secondary education;

    2.

    a strong school-local industry partnership, e.g., its graduates are prioritized by

    the neighboring/local industries for employment;

    3.

    available functional workshop laboratories;

    4.

    available qualified teachers; and

    5. established linkages with local colleges/higher education institutions for possible

    recognition of subject units taken in SHS if and when the student chooses to

    continue academic advancement.

    Table 1describes the general profile of the selected SHS model schools.

    Table 1: General Profile of SHS Model Schools, SY 2012-2013

    School Type No. of Schools No. of Enrollees

    Public High SchoolsGeneral High Schools 8 260

    Technical-Vocational High Schools 14 1,012

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs)

    Private HEIs 7 5,268

    Local University/College 1

    Total 30 6,540Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012

    Specializations offered by some of the SHS model schools are enumerated in Table 2.

    Table 2: SHS Model Schools Specializations

    Region/Division School Specialization

    General Public High Schools

    IV-A Batangas Pinagtongulan National High

    School

    Coffee Course

    IV-A Cavite Sangley Point National High School Security and Peacekeeping

    VI Bacolod City Bacolod City National High School Call Center

    VI Negros Occidental Negros Occidental National High

    School

    Call Center

    VI Bacolod City Sum-ag National High School Agricultural

    VIII Leyte Palo National High School Tourism and Information andCommunication Technology

    X Bukidnon Bukidnon National High School AutomotiveFood Trade

    XII Cotabato City Notre Dame Village National High

    School

    Electric Wiring Installation

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    Introduction 28

    Region/Division School Specialization

    Public TechVoc High Schools

    III Bulacan Balagtas National Agricultural High

    School

    Agriculture

    IV-A Laguna San Pedro Relocation Center

    National High School

    Electronics

    Automotive

    GarmentsFood Technology

    VI Silay City Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial

    National High School

    Food and Beverage

    Welding

    Housekeeping

    Electricity

    VII Mandaue Subangdaku Technical Vocational

    School

    Welding

    Garments

    Commercial Cooking

    VIII Leyte Merida Vocational School Automotive Service, Metalsand Engineering

    Higher Education Institutions

    NCR Makati City University of Makati Tech Voc Basic Technology

    Business EducationCall Center / BPO

    Information Technology

    Art Education

    Performing and Broadcast Arts

    Dance and Sports

    Citizenship and Leadership

    Training

    Allied Health / Caregiving

    Athletics

    NCR Caloocan City Manila Central University Optical Laboratory Technician

    NCR Makati City ADM Consortium Information Technology,Journalism and Medical

    Technology

    V Naga City Ateneo de Naga University Information TechnologyEarly Childhood Teacher-Aide

    Program

    XI Davao Philippine Womens College of

    Davao City

    Bread and Pastry Production

    Commercial Cooking

    Computer Programming

    Clothing Technology

    Drafting Technology

    Entrepreneurship

    Food and Beverage Service

    Graphic and Digital Animation

    Tourism

    Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012

    The modeling involved developing a curriculum, designing and organizing a set of

    appropriate instructional materials, and identifying and using varied teaching and

    learning strategies all at the school level, based on the needs of its students and the

    demands of local businesses or industries.

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    Objectives of the Study 29

    This monitoring study looks into the status of and experiences on SHS Modeling in

    selected schools in the country in preparation for its full implementation by 2016. The

    study was funded by SEAMEO INNOTECH under its Educational Research and Innovation

    Fund as part of the Centers commitment to support DepEds K to 12 Basic Education

    Sector Reform Agenda.

    OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

    The monitoring of model senior high schools forms part of SEAMEO INNOTECH s

    complimentary set of program interventions to support DepEds need for sustained

    technical support in operationalizing the new K to 12 Basic Education Program.

    The study aims to generate knowledge drawn from the experiences of model schools that

    can serve as a good resource for refining the guidelines for the full implementation of SHS

    beginning SY 2016-2017.

    Specifically, the study aims to:

    1.

    determine the pre-implementation considerations and actual implementation

    needs and processes under the SHS Modeling;

    2. identify strengths and innovations of the selected SHS model schools;

    3. ascertain challenges and potentials for improvement; and

    4.

    formulate policy recommendations based on the lessons learned by the selected

    SHS model schools.

    METHOD OF STUDY

    The study consisted of the various stages of the SHS Modeling, from pre-implementation

    to implementation, and including the challenges schools have experienced thus far in

    relation to modeling (Figure 3).

    The pre-implementation stage considered the factors that influenced the school to take

    part in the SHS Modeling program. Activities that had to be undertaken prior to

    implementation were likewise looked into. These include establishing linkages with local

    government units and local businesses and industries; developing appropriate

    curriculum; building capacity especially among teaching personnel; and acquiring

    necessary certifications particularly for teaching technical-vocational subjects.

    The implementation stage included the necessary inputs such as human and financial

    resources, adequate facilities, curriculum, and learning materials, including policy

    guidelines; processes that take place such as intervention programs, use of different

    teaching methodologies, and student assessment; and outputs such as innovations, and

    student employment as on-the-job trainees generated during the first year of SHS

    modeling.

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    Method of Study 30

    Challenges related to policies and implementing guidelines; available resources; level of

    community support, including LGUs and parents; level of awareness; and community

    linkages were also examined.

    The good practices and lessons learned from the first year of modeling were taken in

    consideration before recommendations were crafted to help address the challenges and

    maximize any potential for improvement of the program.

    Key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted from

    February to March 2013 with school heads, teachers and SHS students to obtain

    relevant information on the SHS Modeling.

    Figure 3: Framework of Study

    The study also utilized data generated from a survey administered by the Research

    Studies Unit (RSU) of SEAMEO INNOTECH. The survey, also conducted from February to

    March 2013, was part of a research project that aimed to generate case studies of

    Alternative Delivery Mode (ADM) models in selected provinces of the Philippines that

    would allow for deeper understanding of the implementation of appropriate and

    effective ADMs for the SHS stage of the K to 12 program.

    The draft report was distributed to SHS model schools during a conference held in

    Baguio City in June 2013 to solicit comments and suggestions.

    Of the total number of SHS model schools, four general public high schools and three

    public TechVoc high schools were included in the monitoring study. Due to limited

    resources, selection of SHS model schools included in the monitoring study was based

    on a plan of action that would optimize the Centers available resources.

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    The SHS Curriculum 31

    The list of the seven SHS model schools included in the study can be found in Table 3.

    Table 3: List of SHS Model Schools Included in the Monitoring Study

    Region/Division School Type of School

    IV-A Laguna San Pedro Relocation Center NHS Public TechVoc HS

    IV-A Cavite City Sangley Point NHS General Public HS

    VI Bacolod City Bacolod City NHS General Public HS

    Vi Bacolod City Sum-ag NHS General Public HS

    VI Silay City Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial

    National High School

    Public TechVoc HS

    VIII Palo Palo National High School General Public HS

    VIII Leyte Merida Vocational School Public TechVoc HS

    THE SHSCURRICULUM

    While the SHS Modeling program allows the model schools to innovate and develop

    their own curriculum, DepEd had proposed a senior high school curriculum when theprogram started in 2012. The proposed curriculum consisted of the following: a) core

    subjects spanning seven learning areas, namely, language, literature, mathematics,

    philosophy, natural sciences, social sciences, and the national service training program

    (NSTP); and b) career pathways subjects which cover the areas of entrepreneurship or

    business, technical-vocational, humanities (i.e., sports, arts, music, languages,

    journalism), and science, technology and engineering (Table 4).

    Table 4: Proposed SHS Curriculum (2012)

    Learning Areas Subjects Grade 11 Grade 12 Total

    Hours1stSem 2ndSem 1stSem 2ndSem

    Core CurriculumLanguage English or Filipino or other 54 54 108Literature Philippine and

    World Literature54

    54

    108

    Mathematics Mathematics 54 54 108Philosophy Philosophy 54 54Natural Sciences Life/Physical Sciences 54 54 108Social Sciences Contemporary Issues 54 54 108NSTP Community Service 54 54 108

    Career Pathways, including immersion or practicum

    -

    entrepreneurship or business;- technical-vocational;

    -

    humanities (sports, arts, music, languages, journalism);

    -

    science, technology and engineering

    216 216 270 270 972

    Total Hours 486 486 432 270 1,674

    Hours/Day 5.4 5.4 4.2 3.0

    Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012

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    DepEd has since then modified the proposed SHS curriculum. As of February 2014, the

    revised senior high school curriculum consists of the following: a) core subjects covering

    eight learning areas, namely, language, humanities, communication, mathematics,

    philosophy, science, social science, and P.E. and health; and b) track subjects

    encompassing the areas of academic, technical-vocational-livelihood, sports, and arts

    and design (Figure 4).

    Figure 4: Revised Senior High School Curriculum (2014)

    Source: Department of Education, February 2014

    As compared to the former proposed curriculum (2012) where one subject consists of 54

    class hours in a semester, a subject under the revised proposed curriculum (2014)

    consists of 80 class hours in a semester. DepEd has also clearly identified the specific

    core and track subjects under the revised curriculum. The SHS will have 15 core subjects

    and 16 track subjects, where seven are common subjects and nine are specialization

    subjects, totalling 31 subjects to be taken up in Grade 11 and Grade 12 (Figure 5).

    The career pathways or tracks have also been redefined under the revised

    curriculum. One of the more salient changes is how the Academic Track lumps together

    accountancy, business, management (ABM); liberal arts (General Academic); humanities,

    education, social sciences (HESS/HUMMS); and science, technology, engineering,

    mathematics (STEM). The ABM was formerly one of the main career pathways (i.e.,

    entrepreneurship or business); STEM was also formerly one of the main career

    pathways; humanities was likewise identified as one of the main career pathways, and

    includes sports, arts and music, among others, which were later specified as main tracks

    under the revised curriculum.

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    Figure 5: SHS Core and Track Subjects

    Source: Department of Education, February 2014

    CORE SUBJECTS

    The 15 core subjectsare spread among the eight learning areas. Languagetakes up four

    subjects, humanities has two subjects, communication consists of only one subject,

    mathematics, science, and social sciencecover two subjects each, while philosophy and

    PE and health have one subject each. All 15 subjects will be taken up by SHS students

    regardless of the track they opt to take.

    Table 5lists in details the 15 core subjects.

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    Table 5: SHS Core Subjects

    CORE SUBJECTS Hours per

    semester

    Language 1. Oral Communication

    2.

    Reading and Writing

    3.

    Komunikasyon at Pananaliksik sa Wikang Filipino atKulturang Pilipino

    4.

    Pagbasa at Pagsusuri ng Ibat-ibang Teksto Tungo sa

    Pananaliksik

    80

    80

    80

    80

    Humanities 5. 21stCentury Literature from the Philippines and the World

    6.

    Contemporary Music and Visual Arts

    80

    80

    Communication 7.

    Media and Information Literacy 80

    Mathematics 8. General Mathematics

    9.

    Statistics and Probability

    80

    80

    Science 10. Earth and Life Science (Lecture and Laboratory)*

    11.

    Physical Science (Lecture and Laboratory)*

    80

    80

    Social Science 12.

    Personal Development13.

    Understanding Society, Politics and Culture8080

    Philosophy 14. Introduction to Philosophy of the Human Person 80

    PE and Health 15. Physical Education and Health 80

    CORE Total Number of Hours 1,200

    TRACK Total Number of Hours 1,280

    Total Number of Hours (CORE + TRACK) 2,480

    Total Hours / Number of School Days in SHS (400) 6.2

    hours/day

    *Students in the STEM Strand will take Disaster Readiness and Risk Reduction and Earth Science

    instead of these subjectsSource: Department of Education, February 2014

    TRACK SUBJECTS

    Track subjects comprise seven common track subjects and nine specialization or

    specialized track subjects. Similar to the core subjects, the common track subjects will be

    taken up by all SHS students regardless of their track. However, the common track

    subjects are contextualized as appropriate to specific tracks. All strands under the

    Academic Track (i.e., ABM, Liberal Arts or General Academic, HESS/HUMMS, and STEM)

    have the same list of common track subjects. On the other hand, the Technical-Vocational-Livelihood, Sports, and Arts and Design Tracks share the same list of common

    track subjects.

    Table 6contains the list of common subjects for all tracks.

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    Table 6: Common Track Subjects

    Contextualized Track Subjects

    Academic Track Technical-Vocational-Livelihood / Sports /

    Arts and Design Tracks

    1. English for Academic and Professional

    Purposes

    1. English for Academic and Professional

    Purposes2. Research 1: Qualitative Research in Daily

    Life

    2. Research 1: Qualitative Research in Daily Life

    3. Research 2: Quantitative Research in Daily

    Life

    3. Research 2: Quantitative Research in Daily

    Life

    4. Pagsulat sa Filipino sa Piling Larangan

    (Akademik)

    4. Pagsulat sa Filipino sa Piling Larangan

    (Isports, Sining at TechVoc)

    5. Empowerment Technologies (E-Tech): ICT

    for Professional Tracks

    5. Empowerment Technologies (E-Tech): ICT for

    Professional Tracks

    6. Entrepreneurship 6. Entrepreneurship

    7.

    Research Project 7.

    Research Project / Culminating Activity

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semesterSource: Department of Education, February 2014

    The specialization track subjects differ from one track to another, and even from one

    strand or mini-course to another. This will be illutrated in the following sections.

    Academic Track

    The Academic Track includes four strands: accountancy, business, management (ABM);

    liberal arts (General Academic); humanities, education, social sciences (HESS/HUMMS);

    and science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM). The specialized tracksubjects under this track differ depending on the strand. These are detailed in Tables 7-

    10.

    Table 7: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - ABM Strand)

    8. ABM Strand 1 Applied Economics

    9.

    ABM Strand 2 Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

    10. ABM Strand 3 Fundamentals of Accountancy, Business and Management 1

    11. ABM Strand 4 Fundamentals of Accountancy, Business and Management 2

    12.

    ABM Strand 5 Business Math

    13.

    ABM Strand 6 Business Finance14. ABM Strand 7 Organization and Management

    15.

    ABM Strand 8 Principles of Marketing

    16.

    ABM Strand 9 Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy

    i.e., Business Enterprise Simulation

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semesterSource: Department of Education, February 2014

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    Table 8: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - General Academic Strand)

    8. Liberal Arts Strand 1 Humanities 1

    9. Liberal Arts Strand 2 Humanities 2

    10.

    Liberal Arts Strand 3 Social Science 1

    11. Liberal Arts Strand 4 Applied Economics

    12.

    Liberal Arts Strand 5 Organization and Management

    13. Liberal Arts Strand 6 Disaster Readiness and Risk Reduction

    14.

    Liberal Arts Strand 7 Elective (from any Track/Strand)

    15. Liberal Arts Strand 8 Elective (from any Track/Strand)

    16. Liberal Arts Strand 9 Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semesterSource: Department of Education, February 2014

    Table 9: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - HUMSS Strand*)

    8.

    HUMMS Strand 1 Creative Writing

    9.

    HUMMS Strand 2 Creative Non-Fiction: The Literary Essay10. HUMMS Strand 3 World Religions and Belief Systems

    11.

    HUMMS Strand 4 Megatrends and Critical Thinking in the 21stCentury Culture

    12.

    HUMMS Strand 5 Philippine Politics and Governance

    13. HUMMS Strand 6 Community Involvement and Social Issues

    14. HUMMS Strand 7 Introducing the Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, History,

    Psychology, Sociology, Political Science)

    15. HUMMS Strand 8 Introducing the Applied Sciences (Communication, Journalism,

    Guidance and Counselling, Social Work)

    16. HUMMS Strand 9 Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semester

    *For finalizationSource: Department of Education, February 2014

    Table 10: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - STEM Strand)

    8. STEM Strand 1 Pre-Calculus

    9.

    STEM Strand 2 Basic Calculus

    10. STEM Strand 3 General Biology 1

    11. STEM Strand 4 General Biology 2

    12.

    STEM Strand 5 General Physics 1

    13.

    STEM Strand 6 General Physics 2

    14.

    STEM Strand 7 General Chemistry 115. STEM Strand 8 General Chemistry 2

    16. STEM Strand 9

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semesterSource: Department of Education, February 2014

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    Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track

    The Technical-Vocational-Livelihood (TVL) Track has four mini-courses: home economics

    (HE), information and communications technology (ICT), agri-fishery arts, and industrial

    arts. Each mini-course has sub-specialization subjects that are based on the TESDA

    training regulations (Table 11).

    Table 11:Specialized Track Subjects (Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track*)

    TVL Track Subjects TESDA Training Regulations-Based Specializations

    Subjects Example HE ICT Agri-Fishery

    Arts

    Industrial

    Arts

    8.TechVoc Track 1 Beauty

    Care/

    Hairdressing Cable TV

    Installation

    Rice Machinery

    Operation

    Automotive

    Servicing

    9.TechVoc Track 2 Nail

    Care

    Bread and

    Pastry

    Production

    Visual Graphic

    Design

    Landscape

    Installation and

    Maintenance

    Refrigeration

    and Air

    conditioning

    0.

    TechVoc Track 3 Tailoring Animation OrganicAgriculture

    Production

    Carpentry

    1.TechVoc Track 4 Tour GuidingServices

    Medical/Judicia

    l Transcription

    Rubber

    Production

    Consumer

    Electronics

    Servicing

    2.TechVoc Track 5 Travel Services Horticulture ElectricalInstallation and

    Maintenance

    3.TechVoc Track 6 Hair-

    dressing

    Caregiving Animal

    Production

    Plumbing

    4.TechVoc Track 7 Food and

    BeverageServices

    Aquaculture Shielded

    Metal- ArcWelding

    5.TechVoc Track 8 Housekeeping Food Processing Masonry

    6.TechVoc Track 9 Attractions andTheme Parks

    Tourism

    Crop Production

    Handicraft:

    Fashion

    Accessories

    Handicraft:

    Paper Craft

    Handicraft:

    Woodcraft

    Handicraft:

    Leathercraft

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semester

    *For FinalizationSource: Department of Education, February 2014

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    Sports Track

    The Sports Track includes two specializations: a particular sports or fitness. The

    specialized track subjects under this track are shown in Table 12.

    Table 12: Specialized Track Subjects (Sports Track)

    8. Sports Track 1 Safety and First Aid

    9.

    Sports Track 2 Understanding Human Movement

    10. Sports Track 3 Fundamentals of Coaching

    11. Sports Track 4 Sports Officiating and Activity Management

    12. Sports Track 5 Fitness, Sports and Recreation Leadership

    13.

    Sports Track 6 Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise

    14. Sports Track 7 Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription

    15. Sports Track 8 Practicum (In-Campus)

    16. Sports Track 9 Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity

    Each subject will have 80 hours per semesterSource: Department of Education, February 2014

    Arts and Design Track

    The specialized track subjects for Arts and Design Track are listed in Table 13.

    Table 13: Specialized Track Subjects (Arts and Design Track)

    8. Arts Track 1 Creative Industries I: Arts and Design Appreciation and Production

    9. Arts Track 2 Creative Industries II: Performing Arts

    10.

    Arts Track 3 Physical and Personal Development in the Arts11. Arts Track 4 Developing Filipino Identity in the Arts

    12.

    Arts Track 5 Integrating the Elements and Principles of Organization in the Arts

    13.

    Arts Track 6 Leadership and Management in Different Arts Fields

    14. Arts Track 7 Apprenticeship and Exploration of Different Arts Fields

    15. Arts Track 8 Apprenticeship and Exploration of Different Arts Fields

    16. Arts Track 9 Exhibit