Douglas UFO Docs

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Douglas Aircraft - UFO Research DocumentsThese documents pertain to the research of small team of people in the Douglas Aircraft corporation in 1967 - 1969. They show that some people there took the UFO phenomenon seriously - and regarded them as real, physical objects. Someone decided that it was worth studying them in detail, with a view to developing a new method of propulsion - based on a new theory of physics. This research was, of course, secret.In total, there are about 200 pages of documents, although some of these are just cover sheets.The documents were left in a barn which may have belonged to a Douglas employee who died or moved. The new owner of the place found the files, and sold them on Ebay for $31.00. They were uploaded to my computer for internet publishing.

Text of Douglas UFO Docs

rTC: FROM: SUBJECT: COPIES TO: R. M. Wood, A-830

MEMORANDUM DATE: 7-18-69 A-F3O-BB0I-HCB-4I

H. C. B j o r n l i e , A-833 LIGHT/MAGNETIC FIELD INTERACTION EXPERIMENT J . M. Brown, D. B. Harmon, W. P. W i l s o n . J r . , A-830; F i l e

The l i g h t / m a g n e t i c f i e l d (B/C) i n t e r a c t i o n experiment has been performed and concluded. A d e s c r i p t i o n of the e x p e r i ment, the r e s u l t s and roccmmendatiens are attached t o t h i s memorandum.

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LIGHT/MAGNETIC FIELD ( B / C )

INTERACTION EXPERIMENT

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PURPOSE: I t I s c o n j e c t u r e d t h a t t h o speed o f p r o p a g a t i o n o f l i g h t I s m o d i f i e d when p a s s i n g t h r o u g h a m a g n e t i c f i e l d . I t i s t h e purpose of t h i s e x p e r i m e n t t o d e t e r m i n e i * s u c h an e f f e c t e x i s t s . The e x p e r i m e n t I s t o make use o f e x i s t i n g a o p a r a t u s I f p o s s i . b l e , w i t h a minimum e x p e n d i t u r e f o r t h e p u r c h a s e o f new e q u i p m e n t . METHOD: A change I n l i g h t v e l o c i t y i s d e t e c t e d as a change t h e a f f e c t e d l i g h t beam In t h e f o l l o w i n g m a n n e r : i n wave l e n g t h of

One l i g h t beam o f a Mach-Zender I n t e r f e r o m e t e r i s p a s s e d t h r o u g h t h e a i r c o r e o f a 15 f o o t long s o l e n o i d , w h i c h d e v e l o p s a f l u x d e n s i t y o f 2560 g a u s s . T h i s beam I s t h e n combined w i t h t h e r e f e r e n c e beam t o f o r m i n t e r f e r e n c e f r i n g e s w h i c h a r e f o c u s s e d on a m u l t i - c e l l s i I I c o n diode transducer. The e l e c t r i c a l o u t p u t o f t h e c e l l s , and t h e I n p u t c u r r e n t t o t h e s o l e n o i d are s i m u l t a n e o u s l y and c o n t i n u o u s l y r e c o r d e d . EQUIPMENT: Light Source I n c . , H e l i u m - N e o n Gas L a s e r , Model 2 4 0 , I

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C o l l i n s M i c r o f l a t C o . , two g r a n i t e s u r f a c e p l a t e s w i t h t h r e e a d j u s t a b l e l e ^ s , 12 Inch x 18 I n c h x 3 i n c h ; f o u r g r a n i t e a n g l e p l a t e s , 3 i n c h x 3 i n c h x 4 i n c h , t o o l r o o m g r a d e B. Magnetic Fie Id M a g - T r a n , Model SA-380 s o l e n o i d . Two c o n c e n t r i c c o i l s , c o n t i n u o u s l y wound t o p r o d u c e a d d i t i v e f l u x . 15 f t . l o n g x 2 . 8 I n c h o u t s i d e d a . , wound on an aluminum a l l o y t u b e o f I - I I / I 6 I n c h o u t s i d e d i a . The w i r e I s #3 gauge s q u a r e magnet w i r e ( . 2 2 9 i n ) w i t h g l a s s f i l a m e n r I n s u l a t i o n . The s o l e n o i d i s con -air.c-d w l t h F n a s t e e l t u b e o f 3 i n c h o u t s i d e d i a . x 1/4 i n c h w a l l t h i c k n e s s . Z/Z r.ch t h i c k s t e e l p l a t e s a r e b o l t e d t o w e l d e d f l a n g e s t o c l o s e t h e ends i . ' t h e t u b e . The t u b e i s s u p p o r t e d on 4 i n t e g r a l s t a n d s wi rh i t s c e n t e r i.m i t 7 V 4 i n c h above t h e f l o o r . The a i r c o r e o f t h e s o l e n o i d i s t h e r m a l l y I n s u l a t e u '">>... t h o a ' ""!"- m a n d r e l by t w o c o n c e n t r i c PVC p l a s t i c t u b e s ( w a t e r p i p e ) .7'''-B-''-'-d '-'

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F i g . 5. I n t e r f e r o m e t e r , Far End, With Complete Housing Removed. O p t i c a l Element At Right Is Negative Lens. Solenoid End P l a t e Is A t L e f t . P r o t r u d i n g Leads A t t a c h To "Crow-Bar" C i r c u i t And Power Cables. Thermal I n s u l a t i n g Tubes Lie On Floor Behind S o l e n o i d .

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MEMORANDUM DATE: TO: R. M. Wood, A-830 J . M. Brown/D. B. Harmon, -830 CURRENTLY PREFERRED PROPULSION CONCEPT C. P. Thomas, A-830; File

60y4Z 2-14-68

A-830-BB0I-JMB-I

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FROM:SUBJECT: COPIES TO: REFERENCE:

INTRODUCTION In a previous memorandum, Reference I, a broad spectrum of propulsion concepts was listed and discussed. Certain general directions of effort which could lead to a propulsion concept were outlined in this reference. The purpose of this memorandum is to review the efforts of the past six months, indicate the presently preferred propulsion concept, point out the various degrees of confidence felt for each parameter or portion of the propulsion concept, and indicate the direction of future effort. BACKGROUND The propulsion concepts spectrum listed in Reference I essentially consisted of a generic listing of all known possibilities. For various reasons of flexibility, efficiency, and funding 1he concepts were screened so that three generic types remained for consideration:

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External sources - a. b. c.

Earth Magnetic Field Earth Electrostatic Field Earth Gravitational Field

2. 3.

Stored Energy - Nuclear Annihilation Free Field Energy - a. b. Brutino Field Air Molecules

Furthermore, for space propulsion, types I and 3b are eliminated. Thus, efforts during the past six months have been directed along the general approach of nuclear annihilalion and brutino free field energy. Nuclear annihilation consists of converting the individual (orbital) electrons (and nuclear particles) into photons (neutrinos and/or brutinos). Since the nuclear binding forces as well as the forces which hold individual nuclear particles together are presumed to be due to brutino fields (i.e., brutino flow patterns), by sufficiently rearranging the fields it should be possible " o break up matter. Matter t annihilation requires high intensity fields and the degree of Intensity may depend somewhat upon the individual matter particle being annihilated. When technology has advanced so that sufficiently high fields are obtained, matter annihilation undoubtedly will be discovered as a matter of course, and in a very short time after achievement of adequate field intensity. Analytical work could be performed with the goals of defining the required field strength and optimum characteristics for annihilation as a e l as with the goal of achieving high intensity fields. Efforts along these lines /l ave not been pursued directly since the chance of beating current established methods of physics is deemed not as good as for the free field energy concept.

R. M. Wood, A-030

A-830-BB0I-JM9-I 2-14-68 Page 2

One free field energy concept using brutinos basically is a scheme for beating the second law of thermodynamics. The statistical mechanics interpretation of the second law implies that assemblages of par leles must have configurations which either remain static or must pass to a more uniform state. This free field energy concept is based on taking particles (brutinos) from a uniform population into a vehicle (or propulsion subsystem) then releasing them in a particular direction. The propulsive force results from the recoil of the directional release of the particles. Energy and linear momentum are conserved in the process. The conservation of angular momentum has not been examined and may be a problem. Such organization processes are generally believed to exist, but are not understood. Another free field enerqy concept consists of forming neutrinos from free brutinos, both groups of which travel in the same direction, which results in a thrust throughout the vehicle in a direction opposite the neutrino flow. Work in this area is judged to have a greater chance of success than on nuclear annihilation. EFFORTS DURING THE PAST SIX MONTHS The primary efforts during the past six months have been approximately half on the general kinetic particle equation of continuity and half on the relativity observations. The general kinetic particle equation of continuity is believed to be the general equation which mathematically represents all configurations of matter and radiation in the universe. (There is a possibility that an added "equation of state" may be necessary.) Thus, everything in the universe is uniquely determined as a solution to this equation with the appropriait; boundary conditions. The present status of the paper containing the equation derivation is that there is an uncertainty in one section of the probability analysis. Once this is cleared up the paper would be complete and accurate. Future work should be directed toward finding solutions. For example, the easiest one to find is the particle distribution which is constant with the three space coordinates, the two directional coordinates, and time, and varies with speed i.e., the MaxwelI