Documentation Giving credit to a source for words and ideas borrowed from a source Quotations Paraphrases/Summaries.

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Documentation Giving credit to a source for words and ideas borrowed from a source Quotations Paraphrases/Summaries Slide 2 Plagiarism Plagiarism is using the words or ideas of another as ones own either on purpose or unintentionally (IVCC 2009-2011 Catalog 299). Using any source material (quoted, summarized, or paraphrased) without providing full documentation Failing to place direction quotation within quotation marks Paraphrasing or summarizing a source without fully changing the sources wording or form Using another students work as if it were the writers own Slide 3 Possible Penalties for Plagiarism F on a project F or W for a course Academic probation Expulsion from school Slide 4 Common Knowledge Exceptions Basic information available in numerous sources Information you already know about your topic No documentation necessary When in doubt, document anyway! Slide 5 Documentation Format (MLA) Two Components for Documentation: Parenthetical Citation (In-text Citation) Works Cited page Slide 6 Parenthetical Citation Information in the text of your essay that links each borrowed quote or paraphrase to a source listed on the Works Cited page authors last name page numbers (if available) frame (clear indication of beginning and end of borrowed info) Slide 7 Author beginning; Page # End As Hedges notes, Womens confinement to the kitchen or to the private space of the home was a major source of their isolation (98). Hedges points out that a significant cause of womens loneliness was that they were not allowed beyond the kitchen and the privacy of the home (98). Slide 8 Author, page # at End One source indicates that womens confinement to the kitchen or to the private space of the home was a major source of their isolation (Hedges 98). According to one literary critic, a significant cause of womens loneliness was that they were not allowed beyond the kitchen and the privacy of the home (Hedges 98). Slide 9 Long Quotations More than 4 lines in your essay Full-sentence introduction, generally followed by colon Indent one inch (or two tabs) Omit quotation marks around entire quotation Slide 10 Bendel-Simso insightfully questions the typical reader response to the story: Yet, why do we find him [John Wright] guilty? Why do we readers take Minnie's point of view? When discussing A Jury of Her Peers in a classroom setting, students are all glad that Minnie gets off and that John Wright is dead. However, were one to poll the students before reading the story, few would suggest that killing a canary--the only "crime" that John Wright committed--is a capital offense. (295) Slide 11 Internal Quotations If your quotation already contains quotation marks in the original source, change them to single quotation marks. Bendel-Simso points out that most students would not suggest that killing a canary--the only crime that John Wright committed--is a capital offense (295). Slide 12 Indirect Quotations Indirect QuotationsUsed when you borrow a quotation cited in your source According to Karen Stein, the female characters understand that only other women can help them endure the loneliness and unceasing labor required of them (qtd. in Alkalay-Gut 1).

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