Designing Centerpieces - Central CUSD 4 .Designing Centerpieces T HE FLORAL CENTERPIECE is an established

  • View
    217

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Designing Centerpieces - Central CUSD 4 .Designing Centerpieces T HE FLORAL CENTERPIECE is an...

  • Designing Centerpieces

    THE FLORAL CENTERPIECE is an establishedpart of our society. Holidays, birthdays,dinner parties, and other special events call

    for the use of centerpieces to contribute to

    a festive atmosphere. Floral designers can

    exercise their creativity by designing

    centerpieces with specific themes.

    Objective:

    Demonstrate how to design cen-terpieces.

    Key Terms:

    accessoriescandleholder

    centerpiece

    Floral Centerpieces

    Centerpieces have been the center attraction on tables since the eighteenth century. A cen-

    terpiece is a floral arrangement designed to be placed on a table or a buffet. It should be

    attractive and colorful. Traditional centerpieces are low so as not to interfere with conversation

    at a table. However, contemporary arrangements, such as topiaries, add a splash of color and

    design above eye level. A centerpiece on a dining table is viewed from all sides. A centerpiece

    on a buffet table at a banquet might be one-sided and coordinated with centerpieces on the

    dining tables themselves.

    E-unit: Designing Centerpieces

    Page 1 www.MYcaert.com

    Copyright by CAERT, Inc. Reproduction by subscription only. E030062

  • TYPES OF

    CENTERPIECES

    Types of centerpieces include

    bud vases, small vase arrange-

    ments, round centerpieces, oval

    or diamond-shaped centerpieces,

    and conical centerpieces.

    Bud Vases

    Bud vases are small arrange-

    ments suitable for placing at inter-

    vals on long, rectangular tables.

    Each typically contains one flower

    or three flowers. Bud vases are

    inexpensive to create.

    Small Vase Arrangements

    Small vase arrangements are designed in vases in the proportion of 1 to 1 so that they do not

    obstruct vision. They are more colorful than bud vases and better emphasize the flowers. They

    may be asymmetrical or symmetrical in design, depending on the theme and formality of the

    occasion.

    Round Centerpieces

    Round centerpieces are suited to round and square tables. They may be designed with one

    type of flower or a mixture of several varieties and colors. The container that works best is low

    and rounded. A round centerpiece looks basically the same when viewed from any point in a

    room. The contour of the arrangement may be round or triangular.

    Steps to designing a round centerpiece follow.

    1. Select a low container with a large-diameter opening that will accept a suitable piece of

    floral foam.

    2. Position a moistened piece of floral foam in the center of the container, with 1/2 to 1

    inch of the foam above the rim of the container. Trim the foam edges for easier stem

    placement and shave off the corners at 45-degree angles. Secure the foam to the con-

    tainer with waterproof tape, an anchor pin, or pan-melt glue.

    3. Add greens in a circular pattern around the container. Insert the greens about 1 inch

    into the floral foam at the same level as the rim. The greens should angle slightly down-

    ward, and when viewed from above they should create a circle.

    E-unit: Designing Centerpieces

    Page 2 www.MYcaert.com

    Copyright by CAERT, Inc. Reproduction by subscription only. E030062

    FIGURE 1. A centerpiece adds a beautiful and festive flair when you are

    entertaining.

  • 4. Add foliage in a vertical position at the center of the floral foam. Fill in between the

    center foliage and foliage that forms the circle with more foliage to create a rounded or

    triangular contour.

    5. Position the tallest flower to establish the height of the arrangement. Usually the height

    should not exceed 12 inches so that people on opposite sides of the table can see each

    other.

    6. Take care in placing the flowers. Repeated placement and withdrawal of the stems

    damages the floral foam, creates air pockets, and weakens the support for flowers. Also,

    once a flower is inserted, dont pull the flower out a little bit. An air pocket will be cre-

    ated, and the life of the flower shortened.

    7. Place five or six flowers at the rim of the container. View the design from above to be

    sure the flowers form a circle. The stems of the flowers should radiate from the

    mechanical focal point of the arrangement located at the center of the floral foam.

    8. Use additional flowers between the tall flowers and the flowers at the base to fill in the

    contour. Be sure the stems angle toward the mechanical focal point and that the flower

    heads face the viewer. Leave space between the new flowers that are added. Place some

    flowers deeper into the arrangement to add depth.

    9. Use filler flowers to fill in gaps or openings in the arrangement.

    10. Add greens to cover any floral foam that is visible.

    11. Insert accessories if desired.

    Oval or Diamond-Shaped Centerpieces

    Oval or diamond-shaped centerpieces are similar to round centerpieces but are more suit-

    able for oval or rectangular tables. Common containers for this style are rectangular, oval, or

    circular with low rims. The contour of this design may be triangular or rounded.

    E-unit: Designing Centerpieces

    Page 3 www.MYcaert.com

    Copyright by CAERT, Inc. Reproduction by subscription only. E030062

    Top View Side View

    FIGURE 2. The top view reveals equal-width placements around the container rim and equidistant placements from the center

    of the design (and from the container, too). The side view reveals the effect of varied width and height placementsa

    rounded or triangular contour.

  • 1. Select a low container with a large-diameter opening that will accept a suitable piece of

    floral foam.

    2. Position a moistened piece of floral foam in the center of the container, with 1/2 to 1

    inch of the foam above the rim of the container. Trim the foam edges for easier stem

    placement and shave off the corners at 45-degree angles. Secure the foam to the con-

    tainer with waterproof tape, an anchor pin, or pan-melt glue.

    3. Place two long, matching pieces of greens at each end of the container. Then, insert the

    greens about 1 inch into the floral foam at the same level as the rim. The greens should

    angle slightly downward, and when viewed from above they should create an oval or a

    diamond.

    4. Add foliage in a vertical position at the center of the floral foam. Fill in between the

    center foliage and foliage at the base with more foliage to create a rounded or triangular

    contour.

    5. Position the tallest flower to establish the height of the arrangement. Usually the height

    should not exceed 12 inches so that people seated on opposite sides of the table can see

    each other.

    6. Take care in placing the flowers. Repeated placement and withdrawal of the stems

    damages the floral foam, creates air pockets, and weakens the support for flowers. Also,

    once a flower is inserted, dont pull the flower out a little bit. An air pocket will be cre-

    ated, and the life of the flower shortened.

    7. Place longer flowers at each end, inserting the stems just above the rim of the con-

    tainer. Place another flower on each side. View the design from above to be sure the

    flowers form an oval or a diamond. The stems of the flowers should radiate from the

    mechanical focal point of the arrangement located at the center of the floral foam.

    8. Use additional flowers between the tall flowers and the flowers at the base to fill in the

    contour. Be sure the stems angle toward the mechanical focal point and that the flower

    heads face the viewer. Leave space between the new flowers that are added. Place some

    flowers deeper into the arrangement to add depth.

    9. Use filler flowers to fill in gaps or openings in the arrangement.

    E-unit: Designing Centerpieces

    Page 4 www.MYcaert.com

    Copyright by CAERT, Inc. Reproduction by subscription only. E030062

    Oval Diamond-shaped

    TOP VIEW

    FIGURE 3. Low, horizontal centerpieces may be oval or diamond-shaped when viewed from the top.

  • 10. Add greens to cover any

    floral foam that is visible.

    11. Add accessories if desired.

    Conical Centerpieces

    Conical centerpieces are cone

    shaped or three-dimensional isos-

    celes triangles. These designs date

    from the Byzantine period. A cen-

    terpiece that looks like a Christ-

    mas tree is conical.

    ACCESSORIES

    Accessories are items that

    can be added to a centerpiece to

    create a certain atmosphere or

    interest. These items should be in

    harmony with the design and

    properly placed to be effective.

    Candles are often used. A candle

    can be stabilized by using a

    candleholder. This plastic

    device is round at the top to

    secure the candle and pronged on

    the other end to fit into floral

    foam. Candleholders come in a

    variety of sizes to fit the many

    sizes of candles. If using more

    than one candle, space them at least 1 inch apart. Ribbon, fruit, cones, seasonal items, and

    other objects might also be used as accessories in a centerpiece.

    TAKING FLORAL ORDERS

    To make decisions about the design of a centerpiece for a particular event, gathering neces-

    sary information is extremely important. The image of the business relies in part on good com-

    munication skills by the person taking orders. Taking a floral order involves making a sale for

    the business and should therefore be a promotion of the products and services. In taking an

    order, it