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  • Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601: Bibliographic Research Plan

    CRITICAL CARTOGRAPHY

    Counter mapping of space, place & memory

    Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601 Spring 2016

    Professor Vanessa Irvin

    Bibliographic Research Plan

  • Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601: Bibliographic Research Plan

    1

    Table of Contents

    Introduction…………………………………………………………………………….2

    Audience………………………………………………………………………...2

    Reference Source.……………………………………………………………....3

    Citation Style & Coding Key…………………………………………………..3

    Search Strategy…………………………………………………………………………3

    Subject Headings……………………………………………………….4

    LC Call Numbers……….……………………………………………....4

    Search Terms…….……………………………………………………..5

    Boolean Expressions.………….………………………………………..5

    Natural Language Strings ……………………………………………..5

    Search Process.………………………………………………………………………….6

    OPACS ………………………………………………………………………….6

    Databases and Indexes …………………………………………………………6

    Web Resources..…………………………………………………………………8

    Conclusion .…………………………………………………………………………...…8

    Works Cited..…………………………………………………………………………..10

    Appendix I: Annotated Bibliography .……………………………………………….13

    Critical Cartograph. ..…………………………………………………………13

    Indigenous Cartography.……………………………………….……………..13

    Art Mapping..…………………………………………………………………..14

    Cognitive Mapping ……………………………………………………………15

    Appendix II: Search Term Relevancy Chart..……………………………………….16

  • Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601: Bibliographic Research Plan

    2

    Introduction

    Critical Cartography is a dynamic, cross disciplinary field of study that challenges

    traditional cartographers by pushing against the supposition that maps are objective

    representations of real space and instead calls “into question the presumptions of

    professional cartography, “professional cartography” referring at once to official map-

    making, the dominant map houses, and academic cartography” (Krygier and Wood 3).

    Drawing from postmodernist philosophers, such as Foucault, during the late 1980s and

    early 1990s, advocates of critical cartography set out to reveal “the ‘hidden agendas of

    cartography’ as tools of socio-spatial power” (Einat 1). Critical cartography puts forward

    new mapping practices, known as counter-mapping. Counter-mapping refers to any map-

    making processes that challenge the formal maps of the state. This includes Indigenous

    cartography or ethnocartography, art mapping and cognitive mapping.

    Indigenous cartography, sometimes referred to as ethnocartography refers to non-western

    mapping practices created from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and running

    challenging colonial assertions over land claims.

    Art mapping is “nothing less than the remaking of the world” (Krygier and Wood 10).

    The remapping of the social, cultural or linguistic space challenges the entire notion of

    the professional map and asserts a new form of what is real. Visual artists often create

    new maps from traditional maps or do away with their boundaries all together.

    Cognitive Mapping or mental mapping “refers to the ways in which people comprehend,

    learn, remember, record and articulate their experiences in the physical environment”

    (Einat 1).

    Critical cartography moves the map beyond the realm of an object and into a space for

    complex critical thinking in regards to understanding our world. As such, the develop-

    ment of critical maps are often used as tools for activists and those committed to social

    justice pursuing a new narrative counter to colonial descriptions of space, time and

    memory.

    Audience

    This research plan was designed to serve researchers in the field of cartography, human

    geography, Indigenous studies, visual art and art history, border studies, political science,

    American studies and other related social sciences. This plan may also serve librarians

    working with map collections and georeferencing tools. The core of the sources would

    best serve faculty and students of the University of Hawaii at Mānoa (UHM), but it is

    broad enough in scope for this interested in pursuing this field outside of the university.

  • Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601: Bibliographic Research Plan

    3

    Reference Sources

    For background information on the field of Critical Cartography and its related fields,

    there were several reference sources that I consulted through Hamilton Library:

    Harley, J. B., and Woodward, David. The History of Cartography. Chicago: U of

    Chicago, 1987. Print. (Call Number: GA201 .H53 1987 ).

    This two volume set, whose initial volume was published in 1987 was followed by three

    books compiling the second volume that were released in piece meal over the next 11

    years. This collection sets out to define a new set of relationships between maps and the

    physical world and repositioning at the heart of cultural life and society.

    Kitchin, Rob, and Freundschuh, Scott. Cognitive Mapping : Past, Present, and Future.

    London ; New York: Routledge, 2000. Print. (Call Number: BF314 .K58 2000).

    This book provides a good overview of the origin of the subject area of cognitive

    mapping, contemporary discussions and the directions this type of spatial interrogation is

    headed.

    Scott, Clay, Warren, Alvin, Enote, Jim, and Indigenous Communities Mapping Initiative.

    Mapping Our Places : Voices from the Indigenous Communities Mapping

    Initiative. Berkeley, CA: The Initiative, 2005. Print. (Call Number: E98.F6 M22

    2005 Library Use Only).

    This text discusses the use of oral histories, dreams and story telling as a method of way-

    finding through an Indigenous world view.

    Pitzl, Gerald R. Encyclopedia of Human Geography. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Pub.,

    2004. Print. (Call Number: GF4 .P58 2004 Library Use Only)

    This encyclopedia discusses all the ways in which humans interact and provides

    overviews for critical cartography, indigenous mapping and cognitive mapping.

    Citation Style & Coding Key

    All citations in this bibliographic research plan follow the guidelines of the MLA

    Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th edition). The coding key for this project

    primarily utilized key word search terms (KW) in lower case and in quotes, keywords

    with Boolean operators (AND OR NOT) will be in mixed case with the Boolean

    operators in caps. Controlled vocabulary (CV) search terms in all caps.

    http://uhawaii-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=VOYAGER1848605&indx=4&recIds=VOYAGER1848605&recIdxs=3&elementId=3&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=7&pcA http://uhawaii-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=VOYAGER2078049&indx=2&recIds=VOYAGER2078049&recIdxs=1&elementId=1&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=7&frb http://uhawaii-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=VOYAGER3234658&indx=2&recIds=VOYAGER3234658&recIdxs=1&elementId=1&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&frbg http://uhawaii-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=VOYAGER3234658&indx=2&recIds=VOYAGER3234658&recIdxs=1&elementId=1&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&frbg http://uhawaii-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=VOYAGER2414102&indx=1&recIds=VOYAGER2414102&recIdxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&pcAv

  • Joy Enomoto

    LIS 601: Bibliographic Research Plan

    4

    Search Strategy

    I applied the coding key as previously stated and used the Library of Congress

    Classification Outline to determine subject headings, their subclasses and call numbers.

    Since this research plan caters primarily to the