Click here to load reader

Creating Mom-Friendly Worksites

  • View
    20

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Implementation of Business Case for Breastfeeding in Hampton Roads. Amy Paulson, MPH, AE-C CINCH Director/Instructor EVMS Department of Pediatrics. Creating Mom-Friendly Worksites. Weight of the State Conference, April 12, 2013. Consortium for Infant and Child Health (CINCH). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Creating Mom-Friendly Worksites

PowerPoint Presentation

Implementation of Business Case for Breastfeeding in Hampton RoadsAmy Paulson, MPH, AE-CCINCH Director/InstructorEVMS Department of PediatricsCreating Mom-Friendly Worksites

Weight of the State Conference, April 12, 2013

Consortium for Infant and Child Health(CINCH)Child health coalition with 200+ members serving Hampton Roads, VAEVMS is CINCHs lead agencyMission: Engaging the community to improve childrens health in Hampton RoadsFocus: Obesity, Respiratory Health, Access to Care, Healthy CommunitiesApproach: Policy, Systems, Environmental ChangeStrategic Areas: Obesity Prevention, Respiratory Health Promotion, Access to Care

2Learning ObjectivesIdentify four components of comprehensive worksite lactation support programs Identify three approaches to employers regarding establishing lactation support programs for employees. List at least three factors businesses must consider in establishing lactation support programs for employeesIntroduce a mechanism to evaluate a community level BC4BF project3Primary Goal: Implement worksite lactation support programs with at least 10 employers in South Hampton Roads, Virginia (VDH funding for one year)Evaluate organizational changesCoalition building for breastfeeding promotionCommunity Dialogues on breastfeeding & working Use Business Case for Breastfeeding ToolkitComponents: Private Space, Flexible Breaks, Education and SupportSeptember 2010 - October 2011 & July 2012 - present

Business Case for Breastfeeding Project

Funding from: Virginia Department of Healths CHAMPION Program (Commonwealths Healthy Approach and Mobilization Plan for Inactivity, Obesity and Nutrition) American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Acknowledgments:Virginia Department of Health Funding AgencyLiz Flight, RN, IBCLC Informal ConsultantLiz Marshall, MPH VolunteerBusiness PartnersEmployer ChampionsProfessional groups and coalitionsOther Volunteers & Staff support

Goal Removing barriers.

Target Cities = Norfolk, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, and Virginia Beach

Legislation in PPACASEC. 4207. REASONABLE BREAK TIME FOR NURSING MOTHERSSection 7 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 207) is amended by adding at the end the following: (1) An employer shall provide (A) a reasonable break time for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child for 1 year after the childs birth each time such employee has need to express the milk; and(B) a PLACE, OTHER THAN A BATHROOM, that is SHIELDED FROM VIEW AND FREE FROM INTRUSION from coworkers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk.(2) An EMPLOYER SHALL NOT BE REQUIRED TO COMPENSATE an employee receiving reasonable break time for any work time spent for such purpose.(3) An employer that employs less than 50 employees shall not be subject to the requirements of this subsection, if such requirements would impose an UNDUE HARDSHIP.(4) Nothing in this subsection shall preempt a STATE LAW THAT PROVIDES GREATER PROTECTIONS to employees.From: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 2010, http://docs.house.gov/rules/hr4872/111_hr3590_engrossed.pdf

Toolkit provides resources for employers, advocates and breastfeeding employees

Space minimal or elaborate, flexible or permanent, drab or decoratedEquipment personal or employer-provided, pump, water, cleaning, etc.Furniture comfortable chair, table or deskStorage cooler, refrigeratorFlexible Breaks when needed, extra time; consider distance from lactation area Education paper, technology and/or consultantSupport peer or professional, in-person or not

BC4BF Employer Outreach Approaches:Target mid-size to large employers of women of childbearing ageRecruit participation of partner organizations firstDirect contact by phone, email, in person Healthcare Reform seminars, Workplace Wellness conference Implementation Approaches:In-person consultation and site visit at workplace to introduce BC4BF toolkit & Project Lactation Assessment FormFree technical assistanceTime-limited Incentives

Benefits to businesses:Compliance with FLSAWellness Initiativeincreased productivitydecreased absenteeismimproved staff moralecost savingsCompetitive Employee BenefitCommunity Role Model

4Worksite Lactation Support Program ComponentsPrivate SpaceFlexible BreaksEducationSupport

Space minimal or elaborate, flexible or permanent, drab or decoratedEquipment personal or employer-provided, pump, water, cleaning, etc.Furniture comfortable chair, table or deskStorage cooler, refrigerator

Flexible Breaks when needed, extra time; consider distance from lactation area

Education paper, technology and/or consultant

Support peer or professional, in-person or not

5Outreach ApproachesTarget mid-size to large employers of women of childbearing ageRecruit participation of partner organizations first (i.e., low hanging fruit)Direct contact by phone, email, in person Healthcare Reform seminars, Workplace Wellness conference

Low hanging fruit health service organizations

Also: Direct outreach to Local Employer Spotlights those with some form of existing support; opportunity to enhance program.

Also: Champions working from inside sparked interest.

4. Piggybacking raising awareness6Implementation ApproachesIn-person consultation & site visit at workplace to introduce BC4BF toolkit & Project Lactation Assessment FormFree technical assistanceEligibility criteria for limited-time Incentives

Gain commitment to move forward within project timeframe

LAF = engage with project. Electronic survey or paper / some by interview baseline assessment & planning tool

#7&8 are sell for working with CINCHs Project: For lactation rooms, policy, procedures, education, community resources

8. Offer Incentives examples: pumps, recliners, refrigerators (locally selected)7Lactation Program AssessmentLactation Support PolicyDesignated Lactation AreaProceduresCompany-wide PromotionEmployer SpotlightEligibility Criteria for Incentives

The Sell - Benefits to BusinessCompliance with FLSAWellness Initiativeincreased productivitydecreased absenteeismimproved staff moralecost savingsCompetitive Employee BenefitCommunity Role Model

Healthy BabyHealthy MomHealthy Business9Human Resources ConsiderationsAccommodating flexible breaks and addressing extra time needed in policiesIdentifying private spaces & access optionsOptions for room furnishings and equipment maintenancePromoting the Lactation Support Program with new and existing employeesLong-term sustainability

Policy Example: REST PERIODS, MEAL PERIODS AND BREAKS FOR NURSING MOTHERS

C. Break Time for Nursing Mothers.In accordance with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), EVMS provides employees who have need to express breast milk with the following:a. Two 15 minute paid breaks for every four hours of working time, which would replace any other paid break time normally granted during the employees shift. For those employees scheduled to work a shift in excess of 8 hours, one additional paid 15 minute break may be provided;b. Any additional unpaid breaks as needed to express breast milk (employees must clock out when using unpaid time); and

c. A private location, other than a bathroom, to express breast milk upon written request to Human Resources. Please contact Human Resources for the location of your Departments lactation space or more information.Employees intending to express breast milk at work must notify their immediate supervisor, each shift, and schedule breaks to express milk to best accommodate the employee and the Department workflow.Breaks for nursing mothers will be provided for up to one year after the birth of a child.Expressed breast milk must be stored in personal coolers.

Policy Example, cont.Lactation Rooms and Signage: Educational Institution Setting

Lactation Rooms and Signage: Educational Institution Setting

Lactation Room: Hospital SettingBefore

After

Lactation Room Military SettingBefore

After

Implementation support useful for large and small employersInterest from an external catalyst can accelerate internal compliance & advance comprehensiveness of LSPEmployers gain LSP expertise quickly with BC4BF Toolkit resourcesImportance of flexibility and adaptation as no two situations are identical, even within a large parent organization (e.g. hospital system)Emphasize WIN-WIN-WIN: Healthier babies, employees, business bottom lineImplications for Implementing Health ReformBC4BF Toolkit - No need to reinvent the wheel, reduces burden, saves time and money

Flexibility/adaptation e.g. point of contact in different phases; furnishing options.

17ChallengesCompeting demands low priorityContentment with status quoEligibility Criteria too demanding?Brief project timeframe Identifying an effective championAdditional policy/protocol needed for room & pump management (i.e., cleaning, storage, maintenance)

First three from employers perspective; last two from both sides management level, bureaucracy

1st bullet - Possible resistance as well

2nd bullet although suboptimal existing lactation spaces/programs

Adequate organizational resources meant they didnt have to move on our timeframe18Successes17 businesses were at least minimally engaged16 participated in face-to-face consultations15 completed baseline Lactation Assessment Form14 made implementation progress during project timeframe13 affected by 8 drafted/adopted policies14 created/upgraded 17 lactation roomsOver 6,200 women impacted across worksites

13 employers with new policies, but 8 organizations affecting the 13 employers19Evaluation ChallengesShort term projectNot researchScientific rigor limitedIRB Determination of non-researchUse of incentives helped motivate protocol complianceLactation Assessment Form set-up and completionPiloting was useful for e-formatTimeliness not all completed at most optimal start timeNo formal post-test20Lactation Assessment Form (LAF)General information about business/worksitee.g. type, size, role of respondentHuman Resourcese.g. # women of childbearing age, pregnancy and breastfeeding rates, absenteeism, etc. Company Policiese.g. general lactation support, leave, return to work, insurance coverageLactation Program Componentse.g. Infrastructure, breastfeeding options, funding, resources, etc.

LAF is from the BC4BF toolkit, but we adapted it for our project in Hampton Roads: e.g. electronic administration format, modifications21The Businesses/EmployersLactation Program Assessment Descriptive ResultsBusiness Sizen = 15%Small (1-99 employees)320%Mid-sized (100-499 employees)427%Large (500 or more employees)853%Estimated Potential ImpactCountRangeFemale Employees, age 16-44>4,61915 to 842Male Employees age 16-441,3533 to 233New Babies - Annual Estimate2131 to 5012 (80%) fit description of mid- to large-sized employers, > twice as many large as mid or small employers

80% of employer partners were in the health arena

Partners can be represented in more than one sector e.g. Medical School is health & education; Health Department is govt. & health.

Entry Points for Key Contacts: Human Resources, Occupational Health, Womens & Infant Services (in hospitals).

Low estimate on Potential Impact: 2 of the 15 who completed LAFs did not provide employee data numbers + students + visitors

Annual # babies ongoing impact22The Businesses/EmployersLactation Program Assessment Descriptive ResultsPolicy and Insurance ItemsCountPercentLactation Policy StatusNo Previously Existing Policy853%Previously Existing Policy747%Unwritten and/or Unofficial1173%Maternity Leave PolicyFMLA1387%Disability Insurance213%23The Businesses/EmployersBreast Pump Equipment Employees ReceiveCount%None, employees use their own960%Purchased hospital-grade electric pump17%Rented hospital-grade electric pump17%Portable pumps00%Other320%Unknown17%Breast Milk StorageEmployee provided cooler1173%Company provided cooler00%Small designated refrigerator320%Public shared refrigerator747%Other213%24Evaluation Measures Likert-Type ScalesLevel of Engagement with the ProjectStage of Change TransTheoretical Model of Behavior Change adapted for organizationsComprehensiveness of Lactation Support Program ComponentsLevel of Policy DevelopmentChanges in Physical EnvironmentChanges in Social EnvironmentBC4BF Evaluation RatingsEngagement (E) of businesses/employers with BC4BF Project Minimal = 1: intention, support letter, BC4BF trainingEngagement = 2: onsite consult, lactation area analysisModerate = 3: commitment to enhance LSP, LAF completedHigh = 4: written policy, equipped lactation area, procedures, promotion

Engagement with BC4BF Project1. Minimal Engagement (1 or more) Scheduled face-to-face consultationLetter of support writtenRepresentation at BC4BF training2. EngagementParticipated in on-site consultation and, in some cases, analysis of identified lactation areas3. Moderate or Continuing Engagement (Both elements required)Commitment to develop or enhance lactation support in Project timeframe (i.e. agrees to work with BC4BF Project)Lactation Assessment Form completed (#1)*4. High Engagement (over the course of the Project period) (1 or more additional action steps taken)Written policy adopted (#2)*Designated lactation area identified and equipped (#3)*Procedures developed (#4)*Company-wide promotion activity (#5)**[Corresponds to Incentive Eligibility Criteria]26BC4BF Evaluation RatingsStage of Organizational Change (TTM) Precontemplation = 1: non-issueContemplation = 2: awareness, FLSA compliance, value as family support, considering feasibility Preparation = 3: exploring issue, timeline, info gatheringAction = 4: facilities, policy, champions, signage, promoMaintenance = 5: ongoing champion, eval & monitoring, integration into way of doing business

TTM Criteria 1. Precontemplation: Issue not discussed Working fine as is Status quo (employees on their own to work out BF at work)2. Contemplation: Awareness raised of need to address workplace lactationaccommodation Employees request accommodation Compliance with FLSA #73 Considering value of lactation support as a family friendly/wellness initiative Some incident or complaint filed Considering feasibility3. Preparation (buy-in): Individual or team tasked with exploring issue Vocal commitment of mid- to senior-level management to address issue Enforced timeline to address issue Seeks internal or external input for lactation support program design options, examples How to info Environmental analysis4. Action: Purchases Facilities improvements Some monitoring Announce Signage Champions deployed Setting up room/dcor/engage employees5. Maintenance: Champion to keep it running Follow up if glitches Internal evaluation and monitoring Incorporating into infrastructure27BC4BF Evaluation RatingsImplementation/Level of Comprehensiveness of Lactation Support Program (Comp) Unsatisfactory: No Lactation Support = 1Satisfactory: Basic Model (2 required items) = 2: breaks and non-restroom space; plus privacy, locks, chair, pump, table; and flexible break schedulingSuperior: Basic Model plus (3 or more items) = 3: written policy, education, peer support, enhanced (baby onsite, paid breaks, footstool, recliner, fridge, etc.)

3. Implementation Level of Comprehensiveness Criteria1. Unsatisfactory (No official lactation support)Employees are own their own to figure out BF at work.2. Satisfactory (Basic 2 required elements for compliance with FLSA#73 and Basic level of BC4BF Milk Break Scheduling and Lactation Room options)Private areaElectrical outletLocks from inside or signage or other mechanism to prevent intrusionComfortable chairTable or flat surface for pumpWipes availableNear source of running waterRoom is cleanFlexible schedulingUsual lunch and break times with extra time unpaid Childcare provider brings baby to mother to feed at designated break times3. Superior (Basic requirements plus 1 or more additional elements)Private areaFlexible schedulingPlus one or more of the following components: Written policy addressing accommodation of nursing mothersEducation (Any Basic/Better/Best elements of BC4BF Education options) Pregnancy & breastfeeding info, pamphlets, books, and videos availableCompany offers classes on pregnancy and BF on-siteEducation is available for dads & partners of employeesNames of LCs & other community resources providedCompany contracts with LC to assist employees with questions/concernsContract services of LC available to partners of male employeesMother-to-Mother Support (Any Basic/Better/Best elements of BC4BF Mother-to-Mother Support)Bulletin Board for posting baby photos & notes of supportNames of local support group meetings are availableCompany hosts regular support group meetingsCompany provides electronic options for staying connected Other Support: Enhanced Scheduling options (Any Better/Best elements of BC4BF Milk Expression/Infant Feeding Options)Extra time needed can be made upExtra time is absorbed as paid break timeExtra breaks are allotted for nursing mothersOnsite childcare for access to babyCompany allows mother to bring baby to workOther Support: Enhanced Lactation Room options (Any Better/Best elements of BC4BF Lactation Room Options)FootstoolReclinerSink with running waterEmployer provides/subsidizes portable electric breast pumps for employeesPumps provided for partners of male employees tooHospital-grade multiuser pump availableEmployer provides/subsidizes attachment kitsEmployer provides personal coolersEmployer allows milk storage in shared refrigeratorsDedicated refrigerator in lactation roomSoft lightingAttractive wall hangings, dcorBulletin board for posting baby photos & notes of supportEducational materials available in lactation roomWorkspace is provided (desk or table top)Telephone is available for employee to check voicemailComputer terminal with remote access is availableStorage options for kits/coolers28BC4BF Evaluation RatingsPolicy (P): CHANGE Rating Not Identified as a problem = 1Problem identification gaining agenda status = 2Policy formulation and adoption = 3Written policy and implementation = 4Policy evaluation and enforcement = 5

4a. Policy Criteria1. Not identified as a problemIssue not discussedReticence to formalize unofficial approachWorking fine as isCase by case approach2. Problem identification gaining agenda statusAwareness raised of value of consistent approach to workplace lactation supportEmployee requests for accommodationDesire for compliance with FLSA #73Recognizes value of lactation support as a family friendly initiativeSome incident or complaint filed3. Policy formulation and adoptionIndividual or team tasked with exploring issueAnalyzing issue and optionsVocal commitment to address issueEnforced timeline to address issueSeeks internal or external input for lactation support program designReview of policy samplesDrafting written policyMid- to senior leadership involvement (authoritative body)Policy review & approval procedure put in motion4. Written policy and implementationPolicy officially approvedPolicy communicated to employees and managers per usual channelsPolicy highlighted in organizational communicationSupervisors oriented on application of policyResources deployed (human and financial) to actualize policyProcedures to carry out policy are put in placePregnant employees routinely informed of options before maternity leave5. Policy evaluation and enforcementExtent of enforcement monitored complaints, requestsUsage logs maintainedResults of policy are monitored: employee feedback forms, supervisor feedback forms on predetermined scheduleReport back to managementAdjustments made to ensure effectiveness

29BC4BF Evaluation RatingsPhysical Environment (PE): CHANGE Rating No elements in place = 1Few elements in place = 2Some elements in place = 3Most elements in place = 4All elements in place = 5

4b. Physical Environment Criteria1. No elements in placeNo accessible, available private, clean space No chair, table, or electrical outlet in spaceNo nearby running waterNo breastfeeding equipment providedNo refrigeration optionsEmployees are expressing milk in the restroom or other unsanitary/unsafe locationEmployees are avoiding expressing milk at work due to lack of adequate facilities2. Few elements in place (1-3 of items listed below consistent with BC4BF Basic Lactation Room options and FLSA#73 basic requirements)Private area accessible Private area available with consistencyArea is cleanElectrical outletRoom locks from insideSignage to deter intrusionComfortable chairTable or flat surface for pumpDisinfectant wipes providedNear source of running waterMilk storage options availableStorage options for kits/coolers3. Some elements in place (4-6 of list above)4. Most elements in place (6-9 of list above)5. All elements in place (10 or more of list above)

30BC4BF Evaluation RatingsSocial Environment (SE): CHANGE Rating No support or negative support in place = 1Neutral or some support emerging = 2Positive support, some encouragement for using BF facilities = 3Active support, absence of criticism = 4Enthusiastic support communicated = 5

4c. Social Environment Criteria1. No support or negative support in placeBF employees feel on their own. There is no discussion with supervisors of the desire of employees to continue BF after returning to work after the birth of a babyEmployees avoid expressing milk at work due to perceived lack of supportEmployees avoid expressing milk at work due to fear of job lossEmployees avoid expressing milk at work due to actual threat of job lossEmployees are pumping in the restroomBF employees feel stigmatizedBF employees are overtly harassed with inappropriate comments from coworkers or supervisorsCoworkers may or may not be aware that nursing mothers are pumping at workin their offices, restroom, or elsewhereCoworkers complain or express disgust with regard to BF employeesEmployees are not allowed to express milk on company premisesEmployees hide the fact that they are expressing milk at workSupervisors are inflexible regarding break timesNo routine breaks are provided by the employerEmployees are forced to work through breaks at times2. Neutral or some support emergingBF employees find their own places to express milk at workIssues surrounding BF employees are not discussed openlyEmployer ensures rest breaks and mealtime allowances are availableEmployees breastfeed on routine breaksSupervisors dont interfere what the employee does on their break timesSupervisors may offer or suggest private spaces to use on occasionCoworkers are aware of and tolerant of BF employees using breaks for milk expressionCoworkers may offer or suggest private spaces to use on occasionEmployer has policy to ensure minimal compliance with FLSA #73Employee provides all equipment/supplies necessary for milk expressionEmployer may provide minimal supplies (e.g. wipes) for lactation areas3. Positive support, some encouragement for using BF facilitiesEmployee may freely discuss BF accommodation needs with supervisor or Human ResourcesSupervisors are tolerant of flexible break scheduling when requiredWritten policy reflects extra time needed can be made upDesignated lactation areas are identifiedCoworkers are supportive and/or protective of BF employees needs for flexible breaksPrivacy signs available for lactation areasPhysical environments of lactation areas is clean & inviting and have some company-provided elementsCoworkers are generally aware of support of BF employeesPregnant employees are informed of lactation areas before maternity leaveEducational resources available for pregnant or BF employees4. Active support, absence of criticismBreak time is flexible, extra paid breaks are provided and/or extra time needed is absorbedDesignated and/or dedicated lactation areas are well identified Employer proactively supplies items needed for warm, inviting lactation areaCommunity resources (education and LC) are shared with employeesSignage openly acknowledges lactation areasPregnant employees are given tours of lactation areas in advanceEmployees feel free to express feedback/suggestions on lactation support programChampion identifiedBasic mother-to-mother support (bulletin boards for notes/photos)5. Enthusiastic support communicatedEmployer provides breastfeeding equipment or subsidyEducational options are available for BF employees and coworkers Lactation support program is spotlightedMother-to-mother support options are available in-houseEducational presentations are available in-houseProfessional lactation support options are providedPregnant employees are connected with other employees who use or have used the lactation roomEmployer seeks to expand or enhance lactation areas and program

31Meaningful change 1PE, 2SOC and 3P.

Examples of engagement: Active in BC4BF, completed assessment, receipt of incentives (e.g. furniture, pump kits), etc.Scale: 1 to 4

Examples of organizational change: Assessment of current policy, development of (new) formal, written policy, establishment of room and other lactation support components, etc.Scale: 1 to 5

Examples of comprehensiveness of LSP: flex schedule, paid break time, fully equipped room, education options, support groupScale: 1 to 3

Examples: formal, written policy, implementation and evaluationScale: 1 to 5

Examples of Physical Environmental Change : Lockable room, chair, pump, fridge, sink, table, decor, etc.Scale: 1 to 5Baseline: none to a few elements in place (mean = 1.59)Post: Most elements in place (mean = 4.00)

Examples of Social Environmental Change : Support, resources, promotionScale: 1 to 5Pre: none, neutral or some positive support or encouragement (mean = 2.53)Post: Positive support, some encouragement to active support and no criticism (mean = 3.94)

Correlations: Strongest correlations were between E and PE and SE; TTMSOC and Comp and P; Comp and P and PE; PE and SE

Looked at Size of Business: mention no significant differences seen, by size, but sample is too small.

32Case Example: EVMSLarge Employer - > 500580 women aged 16 44, 233 malesEstimated 50 annual pregnanciesBreastfeeding rates unknownNo lactation support policy at baseline, new policy neededProvides FMLA and disabilityHealth insurance provides Expectant Mother programsEmployee health unit domainPersonal office available$500 start up availableEmployees own pump/cooler packNewsletter and websiteEvolution:E: Engagement from 1) minimal to 4) high

TTM: Stage of change from 2) contemplation to 4) maintenance

Comp: Comprehensiveness from 1) no support to 3) basic model plus several items

P: 1) Policy not a problem to 4) written and implemented

PE: Physical environment from 1) none to 5) all elements in place

SE: Social Environment from 2)neutral or some support to 5) enthusiastic support communicated

34Case Example: EVMS

Established 5 lactation roomsPlans to establish more rooms in all buildings on campusAdd conclusion statement on success of program after this slide.35Next StepsSeek financial support to continue promotion, coordination and technical assistanceOutreach to more businessesExpand coalition componentExpand support for parentsPromote breastfeeding-friendly communityMonitor health impactsPublicity and BIB awards (Business Investment in Babies)

Reinforce / Publicity = BIB Awards & Employer Spotlights

Implications for Implementing Health ReformImplementation support useful for large and small employersInterest from an external catalyst can accelerate internal compliance & advance comprehensiveness of LSPEmployers gain LSP expertise quickly with BC4BF Toolkit resourcesImportance of flexibility and adaptation as no two situations are identical, even within a large parent organization (e.g. hospital system)Emphasize WIN-WIN-WIN: Healthier babies, employees, business bottom line

36AcknowledgmentsElise Wallace, MPH Project ManagerCheza Garvin, PhD Evaluation DirectorNatasha Sriraman, MD, MPH, IBCLC Medical DirectorLiz Flight, RN, IBCLC Informal ConsultantLiz Marshall, MPH VolunteerBusiness PartnersEmployer ChampionsProfessional groups and coalitionsOther Volunteers & Staff support

SupportVirginia Department of Healths CHAMPION Program (Commonwealths Healthy Approach and Mobilization Plan for Inactivity, Obesity and Nutrition) American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Communities Putting Prevention to WorkEastern Virginia Medical SchoolNational Association of Chronic Disease Directors/CDC Action Communities for Health, Innovation and Environmental Change Grant (ACHIEVE)

CHAMPION awarded one-year implementation funding to community organizations, e.g. CINCH

BF promotion tied to CINCHs childhood obesity prevention efforts

38ResourcesBusiness Case for Breastfeeding: http://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding/government-in-action/business-case-for-breastfeeding/Fact Sheet #73: Break Time for Nursing Mothers under the FLSA : http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs73.htm AIA Lactation Room Design form: http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/ek_public/documents/pdf/aiap037226.pdf Sample policy development guide: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/breastfeeding/Documents/MO-BF-WorkPolicy.pdf Questions?Amy Paulson, MPH, [email protected] www.cinchcoalition.orgwww.facebook.com/cinchcoalitionTwitter @CINCHCoalition www.facebook.com/healthyhr Thank you

I loved meeting these women! They became champions for BC4BF and lead to additional partnerships: Military installation site and one woman became a volunteer using her marketing expertise and professional background.40