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how to avoid confusing some words in english

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THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Activity: Grammar for Halloween Skill: Commonly Confused Words

Among vs. BetweenThe words among and between are often confused and misused. Figuring out which one to use is often as easy as determining how many people or things are in your sentence.Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Use among if youre referring to a group. Examples: Speaking loudly is a common trait among the four brothers in that family. The rose is my favorite among all the beautiful flowers at the botanical gardens.

Use between if youre referring to 1) two people, places, or things 2) any number of distinct, individual items Examples: Between you and me, I still watch Sesame Street. Babbette couldnt decide between the mystery, the romance, or the science-fiction novel.

Directions: Circle the correct boldface word in each sentence below.1. Halloween falls among/between Labor Day and Thanksgiving. 2. Brent had a hard time deciding among/between his many costume ideas. 3. Granny said that Hurricane Irene was among/between the most destructive hurricanes shed seen. 4. Ashish exclaimed in frustration, How do you expect me to choose among/between playing pitcher and first base? You all know I want to play catcher! 5. Among/Between all the chores she had to do, Korina disliked folding socks the most. 6. Mr. Kramer asked Samantha to explain the difference among/between frogs and toads. 7. Nancy and Liz vowed to keep the secret just among/between the two of them.

Directions: For each sentence below, fill in the blank with among or between. Then write your own sentence using among or between.8. Sioban couldnt decide _______________ hot fudge, sprinkles, or nuts as a topping for her ice cream sundae. 9. _______________ all the gods and goddesses on Mount Olympus, Zeus was the most powerful. 10. Aaron is sitting _______________ Julia and Leslie. 11. _______________ the many available colors, my favorites are light blue and purple. 12._____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

NONFICTION: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Reading Comprehension

1. Which of the following best describes the mood of the first section of the article? A silly, lighthearted, energetic B gloomy, pessimistic, somber C sensational, tense, foreboding D peaceful, sad, quiet 2.Which literary device is used in the line Outside, rain lashed angrily at the windows? A simile B alliteration C analogy D personification 3.What is one theory why the Winchester House was designed to include staircases that lead nowhere? A to keep the construction workers busy B to convince people that the house was haunted C to make the house a popular tourist attraction D to confuse the ghosts that were chasing Sarah 4.The word supernatural includes the Latin root super, which means A above. B heavy. C inside. D ancient. 5.Sarah Winchester can best be described as A supernatural. C gullible. B eccentric.

6. Which of the following is the most accurate summary of the section A Cursed Obsession? A The ghost of Sarahs husband gave her advice about how to design the Winchester House. B There are multiple theories about what really happened to Sarah Winchester, and why she built her house the way she did. C The Winchester House is now a popular tourist attraction. D Sarah was told if she ever stopped building her house, she would die. 7. The writer includes the detail that there are currently more than 10 shows about ghost hunting on TV as support for the idea that A scientists have recently proved that ghosts exist. B the quality of TV shows has sharply declined over the past 10 years. C people today are very interested in ghosts. D the Winchester House is not haunted. 8. Valerie Worth most likely wrote the poem Haunted House to A terrify the reader. B prove that ghosts are real. C capture the feeling of an old house that is filled with memories of its former owners. D advise the reader against living in a house that might be haunted.

D ghostly.

Directions: Answer the questions below on the back of this page or on another piece of paper.9. Explain why so many people are fascinated by ghosts, even though their existence has never been proved. 10. W hat does the author mean by the last sentence of the article, The Winchester House stands as a haunting monument to a broken heart?

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Directions: Read the nonfiction article Whispers From the Grave in this issue of Scope. Then answer the multiple-choice questions below.

Whispers From the Grave Quiz

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Critical Thinking

Critical-Thinking QuestionsWhispers From the GraveUses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

1. According to legend, why did Sarah Winchester build her mansion? Why did she accept what Adam Coons told her?

2. Why do you think the author included the section Hunting for Ghosts?

3. How could believing in ghosts be harmful?

4. The last section is called A Tragic Legacy. Explain how the title applies to the section.

5. In the poem Haunted House, what is the speakers attitude toward the former owners of the house?

Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition page 1 of 2

Whispers From the Grave example: Brooke and Mary are in the principals office. They allegedly made some inappropriate comments about Kari, although I have never heard them say anything mean about anyone.Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Vocabulary:

1. allegedly (uh-LEJ-id-lee) adverb; having been stated as fact without proof; reportedly

2. alluring (uh-LOOR-ing) adjective; very attractive or tempting; enticing example: I cannot wait another second to sink my teeth into this alluring chocolate cake.

3. blueprint (BLOO-print) noun; a detailed plan or outline example: The contractors who are remodeling our kitchen did not follow the blueprint; they put the space for the refrigerator on the wrong wall.

4. eccentricity (ek-suhn-TRIS-ih-tee) noun; oddness; peculiarity; unusualness example: I would hate it if Uncle Ralph put away his brightly colored clothes and crazy hats and started dressing like everyone else. I love his eccentricity!

5. paranormal (par-uh-NAWR-muhl) adjective; not scientifically explainable; supernaturalexample: This Halloween, my friends and I are going to be ghost hunters, searching for paranormal activity in the abandoned house near the railroad tracks.

6. rattled (RAT-uhld) adjective; unnerved, frightened, or confused example: On Halloween night, a strange creature with glowing eyes ran in front of Jakes car, causing him to swerve violently. Jake was so rattled that he missed his next turn.

7. recluse (REK-loos) noun; a person who lives apart from society example: The character in the story that I am writing is a recluse; he lives in a small cabin on a mountain and has no contact with the outside world.

8. skepticism (SKEP-tuh-siz-uhm) noun; doubt that something is true; disbelief example: I understand your skepticism, but I swear I had a conversation with an alien last night.

9. tuberculosis (too-bur-kyuh-LOH-sis) noun; a highly contagious bacterial disease that usuallyaffects the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, kidneys, or spine example: Tuberculosis can be spread through coughing, speaking, laughing, singing, or sneezing.

10. v engeful (VENJ-fuhl) adjective; desiring or seeking revenge example: When Claire returned from a long trip, her vengeful cat threw up in Claires shoe.Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY october 31, 2011

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition page 2 of 2

Vocabulary Practice:Whispers From the Graveforgiving solitary confidence normality 11. 12. 13. 14. hostile recluse certainty eccentricity vengeful socialite belief ordinariness spiteful hermit skepticism commonnessUses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permis