Coming around again: renewing our commitment to teaching evaluation

  • Published on
    19-Sep-2016

  • View
    213

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Teaching Evaluation

    This section includes articles that focus on teaching of and training in evaluation.Articles may address evaluation teaching and training in diverse environments,including K12, corporate, government, non-profit, or community settings, inaddition to more traditional academic settings. Articles might also identify strat-egies and outcomes of teaching evaluation to community and agency members. Avariety of formats are welcome, including case studies, interviews, and moretraditional articles. Research on the teaching of evaluation is especially welcome.In general, manuscripts for this section should range from 5 to 20 pages in length,although shorter or longer papers will be considered. All manuscripts will bepeer-reviewed, with as timely a review process as we can achieve.

    If you have any questions or suggestions about topics you would like to seeaddressed in this section, or would like to chat about an idea you are consideringfor submission, feel free to call Hallie Preskill, the section editor, at (505) 277-6015or e-mail her at hpreskil@unm.edu.

    Coming Around Again: Renewing OurCommitment to Teaching Evaluation

    HALLIE PRESKILLFor the past several years, AJE has included a section titled, Tips on Teaching Evaluation.Few submissions were ever received, a state of affairs the editor and I see as unfortunategiven the importance of quality teaching to the field. In the hope of stimulating more attentionto the teaching of evaluation, the focus of this column has been broadened and I have beeninvited to serve as section editor. To expand the scope, applicability, and usefulness ofarticles in this section, we have retitled it, Teaching Evaluation. The title change isintended to indicate that the columns focus is broader than simply tips for teaching. Inaddition, the columns scope goes beyond the traditional classroom. We are interested insharing insights about teaching evaluation in other settings, including training and collabo-rative evaluation projects.

    I look forward to the opportunity to help improve our understanding of quality teachingand to aid the dissemination of effective teaching strategies to a broad community ofpracticing evaluators. As an evaluation teacher and trainer for nearly twenty years, Ive oftenwished for a forum where I could learn more about what is being done in classrooms,communities, and organizations to teach others about evaluation.

    I believe the time may be ripe for such a column. As we look back over how the fieldhas grown and matured over the last thirty years, several things become clear. First, the

    Hallie Preskill c College of Education, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131; Tel.: (505) 277-6015; Fax:(505) 277-8360; E-mail: hpreskil@unm.edu.

    American Journal of Evaluation, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2000, pp. 103104. All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.ISSN: 1098-2140 Copyright 2000 by American Evaluation Association.

    103

  • practice of evaluation has seeped into every type of organization and community. While onceconsidered the domain of public, government-sponsored programs, evaluation is now beingviewed as critical to organizational survival and success in many private and non-profitorganizations. A result of this shift is that more and more employees are engaging in internalevaluation practice even though they may not be called evaluators. A quick perusal of jobdescriptions in the fields of education, human resource development, health care promotion,policy analysis, criminal justice, and human services, just to name a few, shows thatevaluation knowledge and skills are fast becoming core competencies for employment. Overthe years weve also come to understand that the field of evaluation represents a special bodyof knowledge and skills that go beyond traditional research methods. Those interested inusing participatory and collaborative approaches to evaluation also need a strong understand-ing of the relationship skills required to teach and to work with others throughout anevaluation process. All of these forces suggest that attention to the teaching of evaluation isimportant, and not just to those who teach evaluation in traditional academic settings. We seethis section as a professional development resource to support the growth and developmentof evaluation practitioners as we continue to develop ourselves, the profession, and AEA.

    In the Teaching Evaluation section we hope to provide a variety of articles that focuson evaluation teaching and training in diverse environments. For example, articles mayaddress evaluation training in K12, corporate, government, non-profit, or communitysettings, in addition to more traditional academic settings. Articles might also identifystrategies for and outcomes of teaching evaluation to community and agency members. Avariety of formats are welcome, including case studies, interviews, and more traditionalarticles. Research on the teaching of evaluation is especially welcome.

    The following list, which is by no means exhaustive, illustrates some of the topics thatare appropriate for this section.

    c Tried-and-true practices in teaching evaluationc Research on the teaching of evaluationc Challenges and issues in the teaching and training of evaluationc Suggestions for how to teach specific evaluation topics, such as multicultural and

    diversity issues, politics, and ethics (strategies and resources)c Interviews with evaluation educatorsc Teaching evaluation across disciplinesc Teaching novice vs. experienced evaluatorsc Overview of evaluation education/training courses and programs and what makes

    them uniquec Historical reviews of evaluation training in organizationsc Discussions/debates on evaluator competenciesc What makes a great teacher of evaluation?c Models for teaching evaluation

    We hope you will take some time to think about writing an article for this section of AJE. Allmanuscripts will be peer-reviewed, with as timely a review process as we can achieve. Ingeneral, manuscripts for this section should range from 5 to 20 pages in length, althoughshorter or longer papers will be considered. If you have any questions, or suggestions abouttopics you would like to see addressed in this section, or would like to chat about an idea youare considering for submission, feel free to call me, Hallie Preskill, at (505) 2776015 ore-mail me at hpreskil@unm.edu.

    104 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EVALUATION, 21(1), 2000

Recommended

View more >