City of Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study ... Center Feasibility Study... · Port Aransas

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  • City of Port Aransas

    Draft Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    May 2017

  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    Index Executive Summary pgs. 2-3 Section I Maintenance and Operation Costs pgs. 4-6 Section II Revenues pgs. 7-8 Section III - Expenditure Revenue Comparison pg. 9 Section IV Membership Fees and Attendance pgs. 10-11 Section V Hours of Operation pg. 12 Section VI Project Recommendations pgs. 13-15 Section VII Appendixes pg. 16

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    Executive Summary The process of this study is to investigate the feasibility of building and operating Port Aransass first Community Recreation Center. In the 2016-2017 budget city council members allocated funding and directed staff to complete this study. The following draft report which is accompanied with a power point presentation from the hired architect firm of GIGNAC Architects is Part I of the study and will be presented at the May 18, 2017 city council meeting. Part II will be presented at the June 20, 2017 Council Summer Goals Workshop and will consist of presenting a final report in addition to a detailed review of the citys bond indebtedness and the impact of a new bond to the citys overall bond debt (as a bond is the most likely funding tool to be used for this facility). This collection of information should arm council with enough detail to make a decision at the conclusion of the June 20 workshop if they want to proceed with building a recreation center or not. If the decision to move forward is yes, the following itinerary is suggested:

    1. Council to conduct multiple community citizen workshops to get input from the various user groups on their ideas and wishes of what the facility needs to provide.

    2. Workshop ideas would be presented to council for them to decide on a final square footage. This would establish the bond amount.

    3. Decide on a vote date. Either a November special election, or May regular election date.

    4. Promotion of bond by council. 5. Citizens vote on bond

    Setting: In both the 2005 and 2011 Parks and Open Space Master Plan (adopted by council as a component of the citys comprehensive plan), a citizen polls identified an indoor multi-purpose center as the number one needed facility in the city. This study assumes that is still the case, and staff believes it to be so. There have been and still are limited indoor recreation facilities/fitness programs in the city, both private and city run. The school has also increased its allowances in recent times for gym use for both basketball and fitness programs. These local programs are often plagued with the relocation blues as they struggle to stay in the same location for any length of time and keep a consistent client base. With our citys small year-round population larger chain fitness retailers have not ventured into the local market, and we dont think theyre coming any time soon either. For these reasons combined, the local indoor fitness opportunity grade of the city is an F, failing. Facility Concepts: Over the past six years, staff has analyzed multiple sites throughout the city on both private and public lands and in terms of location, utilities, access, and cost, none of the

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    sites make as much sense as to placing a recreation facility at our own Community Park on Ross Avenue. Though city land is limited within the park, there is a private parcel of land at the entry of the park whose owners have indicated they are willing to negotiate. This site has ample space for both the facility and associated parking as well as future expansion potential. Being within the same complex as the community pool, dog park, skate park, baseball fields, and park trails, this proposed site would be an excellent fit. Purpose of this Feasibility Study: Though an approved bond would pay for the design, construction, and furniture of a recreation center, the other significant financial burden that remains year after year is the Maintenance and Operating (M&O) costs associated with running this type of facility. These M&O fees are not Hot Tax eligible (neither is a recreation center unless we can prove the gym portion to be a qualified Hot Tax venue) and would likely be funded out of the General Fund or get some help from the Recreational Development Corporation fund (RDC). These M&O costs will naturally be offset by the recreation center generating funds in the form of membership fees, programs fees, and rental of space but typically the national standard for revenue recapture of recreation centers falls between 45% and 90%. As is the case, our revenue recapture for this facility came in at 74%. This report breaks down M&O costs in detail followed by and detailed breakdown of revenues generated including what a membership fee program might look like. It includes utility cost analysis completed by our design teams mechanical engineers and has appendices of various Texas cities recreation membership fee programs for comparison.

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    Section I Maintenance and Operation Costs

    Operating Expenditures

    Expenditures have been formulated based on the costs that are usually included in the operating budget for an indoor recreation facility. The figures are based on the size of the center, the specific components of the facility and the projected hours of operation. Actual costs were utilized wherever possible and estimates for other expenses were based on similar facilities in the state. All expenses were calculated as accurately as possible, but actual costs may be more or less based on the final design, operational philosophy, and programming considerations adopted by staff. A cost scenario has been developed for the facility noted below.

    Proposal - Community recreation center with a large single UIL court gymnasium, teen room, tots room, movement room, weight/cardiovascular area, community multi-purpose room (with kitchen), raised stage area, lobby/lounge/vending area, locker area, adjacent outdoor courtyard, and administrative area. Approximately 23,365 sq. ft.

    Operation Cost Models: Staffing Additions: New Positions Associated Cost Building Custodian (1) $35,000 Front Desk/Gym Attendant (3) $90,000 ($30,000) Babysitter (hourly) TBD Program Instructors* $15,000 Total New Staffing Cost $140,000 Note: Pay rates were determined based on current city job classifications and wage scales. The positions listed are necessary to ensure adequate staffing for the centers operation. It is assumed that many of the existing full-time staff will have center responsibilities as well. Position cost includes required benefits. No provision has been made for a manned concession stand or Tots room operation. * Program instructors are paid at several different pay rates and some are also paid

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    per class and many will be run by existing staff. This makes an hourly breakdown difficult. General programs consist of fitness, teen activities, senior classes, general

    interest classes and other misc. programs. Maintenance and Operation Cost Associated Cost Office supplies 2,000 Maint./repair/mat. 7,000 Janitor supplies 2,000 Rec. supplies 5,000 Concession supplies 1,000 Uniforms 500 Printing/postage 500 Resale items 2,000 Membership ID equipment 1,500 Utilities (gas, water, sewer, elec) 69,905 Insurance 30,000 Communications 2,400 Contract services** 8,000 Advertising 1,000 Training 1,500 Dues & subscriptions 500 Trash pick-up 2,000 Bank charges*** 4,000 Total M & O Cost $140,805 Grand Total of Annual Operation Cost $280,805

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    ** Contract services cover maintenance contracts, control systems work, and contract

    labor. *** Includes charges for credit card use and fees for electronic funds transfer.

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  • Port Aransas Recreation Center Feasibility Study

    City of Port Aransas Admin

    Section II - Revenues The following revenue projections were formulated from information on the specifics of the project and the demographics of the service area as well as comparing them to state-wide statistics, other similar facilities, and the competition for recreation services in the area. Actual figures will vary based on the size and make up of the components selected during final design, philosophy of operation, fees and charges policy, and priorities of use. All revenues were calculated using a reasonably conservative approach. Revenue Projection: Category Revenue: (based on a low/moderate fee schedule) Fees Daily Admissions 26,000 3 Month Passes 16,200 Annuals 110,000 Rentals* 9,490 Total $161,690 Programs**