Cauldron Issue 15

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11/29 Issue of The Cauldron at Cleveland State University

Text of Cauldron Issue 15

  • NOVEMBER 29, 2010 ESTABLISHED 1929 ISSUE 14 | FREE

    THECAULDRON

    THE MELTING POT

    ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

    SPORTS

    NEWS

    DISNEYS TANGLEDGREAT FOR BOTH KIDS AND ADULTS

    NFL WEEK 12:BROWNS BEATPANTHERS

    BY JON CONLEY

    BY KEVIN VARGO

    Kanyes Dark Fantasy

    Page 8

    AIRPORT SECURITY: THE SACRIFICE OF FREEDOM, PRIVACYTO FEEL SAFEBY JON HERZBERGER

    COLLEGE OF HUMAN AND EDUCATION SERVICES GAINS ACCREDITATION

    BY MATT GLADDING

    Native American Student Org

    SpotlightPage 3

    RETURN OF THE

    KING?

    LeBron JamesBack in Cleveland

    Cavaliers Progressing;Record at 7-9

    By Samah Assad

    By Ray Danner

    Avoiding the DramaPage 11

    Issue 14 Master.indd 1Issue 14 Master.indd 1 11/28/10 11:08 PM11/28/10 11:08 PM

  • VOLUME 111 ISSUE 14NOVEMBER 29, 2010CONTENTS|

    The Cauldron prints according to sound journalistic principles of accuracy,

    accountability, integrity and transparency--with a recognition of press freedom and

    student expression. It shall remain an unbiased forum in order to represent the entire campus

    community.

    MISSION STATEMENT ON THE COVERGraphics depicting former Cavalier and current

    Heat member, LeBron James as Golem/Smeagle from Lord of the Rings triology. James, a two-time league MVP, was frequently called

    the King while in Cleveland. His departure to Miami indicated - in the eyes of many - that he

    only cared about a precious ring.

    THE CAULDRON

    Concert Picks Page 8

    Noise Inspectors Page 8

    Pixel Perfect: IloMilo Page 8

    Book Looks Page 9

    Tangled Review Page 9

    Events Calendar Page 3

    Student Organization Spotlight Page 3

    Special Collections Receives Award Page 4

    College of Human and Education Services Accredited Page 4

    Airport Body Scans Page 10

    College Recipe Corner Page 10

    Facebook Super Logoff Page 11

    RTA Fare Jumpers Find Slack Page 11

    ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

    NEWS

    MELTING POT

    BREAKING NEWS | CSUCAULDRON.COM

    The StaffEditor-in-ChiefReid Jackson May

    Managing EditorAlexes SpencerNews EditorKristen Mott

    Arts & Entertainment EditorBen Gifford

    Copy / Web EditorJustin Brenis

    Photography EditorJonathan Killstring Herzberger

    Graphic DesignerAndrew Treska

    Advertising ManagerJayson Gerbec

    Business ManagerAnne Werner

    Student Media & Web SpecialistDaniel Lenhart

    Faculty AdvisorDr. Edward Horowitz

    Staff WritersSamah Assad,

    Jon Conley, Meredith Horrigan,

    Ariana Johnson, Pete Lindmark, Kiel Shrefl er, Matt Stafford, Dan Stanton,

    Gabriella Tomaro, Meredith Traxler,

    Kevin Vargo

    Advertising:For advertising inquiries e-mailus at cauldronadvertisements@

    hotmail.com or contactJayson Gerbec at (216) 687-2270

    Contact UsCleveland State University

    4th Floor Cole CenterCleveland, Ohio 44115phone (216) 687-2270

    fax (216) 687-5155www.csucauldron.com

    Cauldron meetings are held every Monday on the third fl oor of the

    student center, room 339 (dept. of Student Life).

    Stop by or email us if interested.cauldroneditors@gmail.com

    The Cauldron welcomes and en-courages student feedback. We can be reached via the above email, or in our offi ces on the fourth fl oor of the Cole Center (Chester & 30th).

    SPORTS

    NFL Week 12: Browns Beat Panthers Page 5

    Issue 14 Master.indd 2Issue 14 Master.indd 2 11/28/10 11:08 PM11/28/10 11:08 PM

  • 3 csucauldron.com November 29, 2010

    NEWS

    The Native American student organization is a newly reactivated group on campus and is working to make their presence known.

    The president of the group is Cynthia Biro, a graduate student and a citizen of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians from Northern Michi-gan. In spring 2010, Erin Hanrahan, who is now the treasurer of the group, contacted Biro asking if she would be interested in beginning a group dedicated to Native American culture.

    It was brought to my attention and personally witnessed over the last year that CSU has little Na-tive American student representation, said Biro.

    Over the past summer, Biro and Hanrahan worked with Reuben Shendo, vice-president, and Marie Stolkowski, secretary, to establish the organization.

    In September, the executive members reacti-vated the Native American Alliance organization, and are currently in the process of changing the name offi cially to the Native American student organi-zation.

    Biro said that Cuyahoga county contains the largest number of Na-tive Americans in Ohio, and yet it is one of the few states that does not have any federally recognized tribes.

    This prevents access to critical community and cultural resources that are benefi cial for urban communities, said Biro. There remains little rep-resentation and support for Cleveland Native Ameri-can people.

    Biro said that one of the goals of the organiza-tion is to help change this by increasing awareness of Native American culture.

    The organization cur-rently contains about ten members. Biro said that six of the members are Native American CSU students who come from tribes including Ottawa, Winnebago, Navajo, Jemez Pueblo, Kickapoo and Sioux. Other members include Native American community mem-bers and organizations that are located in northeast Ohio.

    However, any student, native or non-native, is welcome to join the organization.

    According to Biro, the organization works to

    provide social, political, and academic support for Cleveland State University students of Native Ameri-can descent.

    As an organization, NASO allows Native Ameri-can students to network with other similar students, connect with their cultural history, and explore them-selves as individuals, said Biro.

    The group helps students accomplish these goals through hosting a variety of events. The organization worked with the Offi ce of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs (ODAMA) to host Native American heritage month this past month.

    The heritage month included a round dance, forums, motivational speakers and art exhibits. A fi lm screening of The Business of Fancy Dancing was

    also open to students. Shendo said that the fi lm, Invited [students] to take a look at a Native American writer/poet successfully establishing himself in an urban area and the confl icts he faces when he returns to the reservation.

    A second round dance is planned for March to celebrate the Spring Equinox.

    This day is a culturally signifi cant day for many tribal nations, noted Biro.

    Study sessions and various social events are held throughout the year. In addition, the organization works with the Native American Youth outreach program within the Greater Cleveland region, and volunteers with the Native American cultural garden on Martin Luther King Blvd.

    We decided that the best way we can give back as students is to share our knowledge, and become mentors and role models, said Biro.

    Biro also said that little atten-tion is given to the social problems that exist for Native Americans. She explained that some reservations have an unemployment rate that reaches 80 percent, and heart disease and diabetes are common causes of death among the tribes.

    I am a fi rm believer that the best proactive solutions to these issues can

    be solved only when the general population starts thinking about Native people outside of the historical context, said Biro. Understanding history is impor-tant, but only if you intend to use it to improve upon the present and future.

    Meetings for the organization are typically held once per month. To be put on the mailing list, or to learn more about the group, send an e-mail to naso-atcsu@gmail.com or contact Cynthia Biro at ccbiro@gmail.com.

    (L to R): Roberto Chavez, Cynthia Biro and Marie Stolkowski

    Student Org Spotlight:Native American Student OrganizationBy Kristen Mott, The Cauldron News Editor

    Weekly Events Calendar

    By Kristen Mott, The Cauldron News Editor

    11/29

    Mens basketball vs. Robert Morris at 6 p.m. at the Wolstein center

    11/30

    Mens swimming and diving meet at 3 p.m. at Busbey natatorium

    Slam Dunk and 3-point Shootout at 7:30 p.m. in the rec center

    12/1

    Fast Food Nation screening from 1-4 p.m. in BU 118

    Reading and book signing with poets Sandra Doller and Ben Doller at 7:30

    p.m. in SC 315

    12/2

    Blacksploitation: Films of the 1970s at noon in MC 135

    Greek Life holiday party from 7:30 11 p.m. in SC 311

    12/3

    Womens basketball vs. Western Michigan at 7 p.m. at the Wolstein center

    SGA Senate Meeting at 5 p.m. in SC 315

    12/4

    Kuumba Arts Festival at 6 p.m. in MC auditorium

    Issue 14 Master.indd 3Issue 14 Master.indd 3 11/28/10 11:08 PM11/28/10 11:08 PM

  • From a fi eld of nominees ranging from big cities to historical societies, Special Collections at the Michael Schwartz library won an Achievement Award from the Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board (OHRAB).

    The OHRAB is a non-profi t organization that pro-vides advice and assistance to groups which maintain, preserve and provide public access to historical items.

    According to Bill Barrow, Special Collections librarian, the OHRAB is primarily concerned with the standards and performance of records keeping and archival operations in the state of Ohio.

    In order to raise awareness of the board and its functions, Barrow said the OHRAB decided to start awarding and recognizing various institutions.

    The board presented the Achievement Award to Special Collections for its leadership on