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Body Image and Disordered Eating American teens in crisis

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  • Slide 1
  • Body Image and Disordered Eating American teens in crisis
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  • The Need for Addressing Body Image and Disordered Eating b 60% of average weight girls and 18% of underweight girls are trying to lose weight b Adolescent girls are avoiding calcium rich foods because they view them as fattening b One in four London girls were found to be damaging their IQs by dieting b Weight reduction efforts by teenaged girls results more often in weight gain b Eating disorders are on the rise and are turning up in younger girls
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  • The School Environment How can school policies and practices support positive self-esteem, body image and healthy eating habits? b Zero tolerance for discrimination/harassment b Educational opportunities for staff b Ongoing support group b Parent education b Healthy school meals programs b Adequate time for eating b Nutrition education in the curriculum
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  • Body Image and Disordered Eating Topics to be covered: b b The Media, Body Image and Eating Disorders b b Tips for Becoming a Critical View of the Media b b The Perfect Body Myth: A Look at Teen Body Size b b Some Basic Facts About Eating Disorders b b How to Help a Friend: b b Information for Teachers regarding Eating Disorders
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  • Current Problems with the Media b Media images define beauty b Currentlymedia messages scream Thin is In! b Value placed on body size ($$$= thin)
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  • Teens Exposure to the Media b b Adolescent girls get most of their health info from main stream media b b 60% of Caucasian girls report reading at least one fashion magazine regularly b b Womens magazines have 10.5 times more advertisements and articles promoting weight loss than mens magazines b b The average teen watches 3-4 hours of TV per day TV commercials 1 out of 3.8 sent some sort of attractiveness message
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  • Become a Critical Viewer Teens do not need to passively receive these negative messages - they can take action!
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  • When viewing messages, keep in mind... b Media messages are constructions, not reflections of reality b Message has been carefully crafted with an intentwhat is this intent? b Ads are created to buy or support a product or service b Viewer chooses how they receive message
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  • Action Steps to Take b Talk back to your TV b Send positive communication to inspiring messages b Send negative communication to offensive messages b Tear out magazine pages - enjoy your edited magazine! b Talk with friends and family b Boycott products from companies sending negative messages
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  • The Perfect Body Myth: A Look at Teen Bodies b Significant change takes place in preteen and teen years b Knowing what to expect may lessen some fears b Help kids accept wider definition of beauty
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  • Growth During Adolescence b Most rapid growth period other than infancy b Between ages 12 -18 15-20% of adult height15-20% of adult height 50 -80% of adult weight50 -80% of adult weight 45% of skeletal mass45% of skeletal mass
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  • Fat Accumulation During Puberty b Fat deposition occurs between ages 9-12 b Body is getting ready for explosive growth b Fat/growth is met with fear and anxiety b This stored fat usually disappears by late teens
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  • Healthy Eating & Active Lifestyle b The winning combination! b Teen growth spurt is an opportunity of a lifetime b Adopt healthy behaviors that will last a lifetime b Healthy food choices and daily exercise
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  • Some Basic Facts About Eating Disorders b Signs and Symptoms b Suspected Causes b Recommendations for helping someone
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  • General Definition of Eating Disorder b Anorexia, Bulimia and Binge Eating Disorder b Extreme emotions, attitudes and behaviors regarding weight and food issues b Serious emotional and physical problems b Can be life-threatening
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  • Anorexia Nervosa b Characterized by self-starvation & excessive weight loss b Symptoms: Refusal to maintain body weight above minimal normal valueRefusal to maintain body weight above minimal normal value Intense fear of weight gainIntense fear of weight gain AmenorrheaAmenorrhea Extreme concern with body weight/shapeExtreme concern with body weight/shape
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  • Bulimia Nervosa b Characterized by secretive cycle of binge eating followed by purging b Symptoms Repeated episodes of bingeing and purgingRepeated episodes of bingeing and purging Feeling out of control during binge eatingFeeling out of control during binge eating Frequent dietingFrequent dieting Extreme concern with body weight and shapeExtreme concern with body weight and shape
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  • Binge Eating Disorder b Compulsive overeating b No purging, but sporadic fasts or repetitive diets b Feelings of shame or self-hatred after binge b Associated with anxiety, depression, loneliness b Body weight varies
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  • Suspected Causes of Eating Disorders b Complex, multi-factorial BehavioralBehavioral EmotionalEmotional PsychologicalPsychological InterpersonalInterpersonal SocialSocial
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  • Psychological Factors b Low self-esteem b Feelings of inadequacy b Feelings of lack of control b Depression, anxiety, anger, loneliness
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  • Interpersonal Factors b Troubled family and personal relationships b Difficulty expressing emotions and feeling b History of being teased or ridiculed based on size or weight b History of physical or sexual abuse
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  • Social Factors b Cultural pressures that glorify thinness b Narrow definitions of beauty b Cultural norms that value people based on physical appearance
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  • Eating Disorders Information for Teachers Information here adapted from BodyWise resource for classroom teachers
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  • Why Should Teachers Be Concerned? b Disordered eating affects learning outcomes b Younger children are developing eating disorders b All ethnic and cultural groups are vulnerable
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  • Become Familiar With Signs and Symptoms of Eating Disorders b Physical b Behavioral b Emotional
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  • Physical Signs and Symptoms b Weight loss or fluctuation b Abdominal pain b Feeling full or bloated b Feeling faint or cold b Dry hair/skin b Lanugo hair
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  • Behavioral Signs and Symptoms b Dieting or chaotic food intake b Pretending to eat, throwing away food b Excessive exercising b Preoccupation with food b Frequent trips to bathroom
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  • Emotional Signs and Symptoms b Dissatisfaction with appearance b Sadness, feelings of worthlessness b Perfectionist attitude
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  • Teachers as Role Models Ask: b Do I promote fear of fat by my words/actions? b Am I dissatisfied with my body size/shape? b Am I always dieting? b Do I make comments about size/shape? b Do I have prejudices against overweight children or adults?
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  • Address Healthy Eating from Many Avenues: b Health b Science b Social Studies b Media Literacy b Body Awareness (sex ed)
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  • Promote a Safe School Environment Zero Tolerance for: b Size and sexual discrimination b Harassment b Teasing b Name Calling
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  • Take Action When Concerned About a Student Goal: Communicate to student that you care and refer him/her to a health care provider trained in eating disorders BodyWise Resource: How to Help a Student
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  • Assist Students in How to Help a Friend b EDAP resources are terrific b Taking action is encouraged
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  • Module 4: Body Image and Disordered Eating Information and activities primarily focused on prevention efforts helping to combat negative body image and disordered eating
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  • Whats the Truth? b T/F Quiz b Begins module with active student inquiry b Address misconceptions from the start
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  • Background Information Sheets b b The Media, Body Image and Eating Disorders (EDAP) b b Tips for Becoming a Critical Viewer of the Media (EDAP) b b The Perfect Body Myth: A Look at Teen Body Size b b Some Basic Facts About Eating Disorders (EDAP) b b How to Help a Friend (EDAP) b b Say No to Dieting (from Mirror/Mirror, Beef Council)
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  • Activity 1: Truth in Advertising b Students critique messages in popular teen magazines b Redesign an ad to reflect more healthful message
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  • Activity 2: Self-Esteem Beyond Looks b Students learn about natural body changes that take place in teen years b Activity focuses on identifying admirable yet non-physical characteristics in others and self
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  • Activity 3: Say No! to Dieting b Students learn about various eating disorders b Plan out campaign to send message via various media, Say No! to Dieting (adapted from Mirror/Mirror resource)
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  • The Virtual Connection Online resources on body image and eating disorders : b EDAP National ED Information Center (Canada) b BodyWise b Something Fishy
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