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Biopolyester Particles. Inclusions in MOs Inorganic Inclusions: – Magnetosomes Organic Inclusions: – Biopolyester granules (PHA)

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  • Slide 1
  • Biopolyester Particles
  • Slide 2
  • Inclusions in MOs Inorganic Inclusions: Magnetosomes Organic Inclusions: Biopolyester granules (PHA)
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  • Production of Inclusions The key enzymes are the polyester synthases PHA synthases: These enzymes catalyse the enantioselective conversion of (R)-3- hydroxyacylCoA substrates to PHAs In this process CoA is released again 88 synthases are cloned and characterised
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  • PHA producing bacteria
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  • Slide 6
  • Production of Inclusions PHAs are produced: When Carbon sources are available in surplus When other nutrients are limiting PHAs are stored in the cells as water insoluble particles inside the cell. Who is producing PHAs: Eubacteria Archea
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  • Why do these bacteria produce PHAs? PHAs are produced as intracellular storage Upon carbon source starvation the polymers are being mobilised again Enzymes used for this: PHA Depolymerases Location of the enzymes: On the surfaces of the granules
  • Slide 8
  • Biopolyester
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  • PHAs potential applications Size, core composition and surface functionality can be taylored Functionalised nanoparticles Biocompatible, biodegradable Drug delivery Protein immobilisation diagnostics
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  • PHAs applications Thermoplastic properties Packaging industry Medicine Pharmacy Agriculture Food industry Raw material for enantiomerically pure chemicals
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  • Structure and Properties of 2 Major PHAs
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  • The 4 Main groups of PHA synthase
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  • Genetics of PHA synthases
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  • Polyester synthese
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  • Metabolic routes for Polyester biosynthesis
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  • Polyester inclusion self assembly and structure
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  • Taylor made Biopolyester particles
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  • PHA production
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  • Production of fusion proteins
  • Slide 20
  • PHB chips for immunoassays
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  • Contact Printing
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  • Micro patterning
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  • Long term stability of printed fusion protein
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  • Confocal image of Fusion protein CP onto PHA surfaces
  • Slide 25
  • PHA coated SPR chips
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  • 26 2005 Nokia YN 10.10.2006 Trends for Plastic Materials Raw Material shortage Polymers from renewable raw materials will become important Current examples like PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) grown in genetically modified corn plant leaves PLA (polylactide) produced by the fermentation of sugars extracted from plants PHB (polyhydroxybutyrate) produced by bacteria. New synthesis methods of old polymers like PA11 will be established : example PA11 derived from castor plantbased renewable resources Protein polymers Extreme mechanical properties Protein polymers are synthetic proteins created "from scratch" through chemical DNA (gene) synthesis, and produced in quantity by traditional large-scale microbial fermentation methods Through genetic engineering, it will be possible to tailor the physical structure and biological characteristics of protein polymers to achieve required properties Due to their synthetic design, protein polymers are capable of combining the biological functionality of natural proteins with the chemical functionality and exceptional physical properties of synthetic polymers
  • Slide 27
  • Materials technology in a key role Materials technology as a potential enabler for: Enhanced user experience New functionality New form factors Improvements in production efficiency New solutions for energy management, data storage Need multi-disciplinary research materials, mechanics, memory, electronics, energy Considerations for environmental sustainability, volume production
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  • 28 2005 Nokia YN 10.10.2006 Trends for Plastic Materials Tailoring of properties is made through additive technologies Old property fine tuning with additives like internal lubrication, thermal conductivity, and static dissipation smart plastics with additives Tunable electrical properties Polymer magnets Shape memory plastics Tunable friction properties Nano Technologies Biodegration Controlled biodegradation will be used in many new applications Food preservation Explosives Security