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PHOTO GUIDE ARTI ST

ARTI ST PHOTO GUIDE · 9/5/2020  · TOP TIPS 10 General Tips 10 Artwork Tips 11 CAMERA MODE 13 Aperture ... professional photography lights, ... flash. • Avoid deep shadows, tonal

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Text of ARTI ST PHOTO GUIDE · 9/5/2020  · TOP TIPS 10 General Tips 10 Artwork Tips 11 CAMERA MODE 13...

  • P H O T OG U I D E

    A R T IST

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 2

    THIS GUIDE TAKES YOU THROUGH ALL THE

    IMAGES THAT WE USE AND GIVE YOU TIPS

    ON HOW TO CREATE HIGH-QUALITY IMAGES

    2A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T

    TABLE OF CONTENT

    KEY SHOTS 3

    SETTING UP 4Styl ing 4Approach 4Lighting 5

    EQUIPMENT & SETTINGS 6Camera 6Lenses | Focal Length 6Tripod 8Resolution 8Fi le Format 8White Balance | Colour Temperature 9

    TOP TIPS 10General Tips 10Artwork Tips 11

    CAMERA MODE 13Aperture Prior ity Mode 14Shutter Prior ity Mode 16ISO 18

    EXAMPLE IMAGES 19

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 3

    KEY SHOTS

    1. PORTRAIT**

    Mid-shot of yourself

    surrounded by artworks or

    the studio environment

    2. IN SITU**

    Wide shot of yourself

    surrounded by artworks or

    the studio environment

    3. ACTION SHOT**

    Mid-shot of yourself working

    and close-up of hands

    4. STUDIO DETAILS

    Close-up of brushes,

    scattered sketches, colour

    palettes , interest ing

    decorat ions, etc 

    5. WIDE ANGLE SHOT OF

    STUDIO

    6. WIDE CROP OF ARTWORKS

    A number of artworks

    displayed on the wall , or

    stacked together on the side

    (showing quantity)

    7. ARTWORK

    A straight frontal shot of

    the ar twork

    8. ARTWORK DETAILS

    Interesting detai ls from

    various angles

    9. ARTWORK INSTALLATION

    Shot of the Artwork hanged

    in an interior or a gal lery

    (Can also be a well done

    photo-montage).

    10. OTHER

    Here you can have fun,

    experiment, why not. . .

    ** P lease take these in Landscape and Portrait Orientation (we use

    them for di f ferent purposes) .

    You can f ind examples on page 19.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 4

    SETTING UP

    A P P R O A C H

    S T Y L I N GYOU MIGHT NEED TO STYLE THE SPACE BEFORE TAKING THE

    PHOTOS.

    • Take an int imate and

    informal approach, gett ing

    close to the subject whi le

    lett ing i t speak for i tself .

    • Take pictures in a mixture

    of por trait and landscape

    or ientat ion. I f i t ’s a shot you

    real ly l ike , take i t in both

    orientat ions. 

    • Keep things that are

    essent ia l to your pract ice ,

    c lear away empty bott les/

    clutter/trash bags, etc. 

    • Think about the narrat ive—

    what ’s the re lat ionship

    between the foreground and

    the background?

    • Feel f ree to re-arrange any

    equipment or props for the

    narrat ive whi le keeping a

    sense of authent ic i ty.

    • Stay true to your sty le

    and transmit that in your

    photos.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 5

    2700KWarm white

    3000KSoft white

    4000KNeutral white

    5000KCool White

    L I G H T I N G

    • Aim for br ight and sharp

    images.

    • Natural l ight f rom a window,

    balcony or rooftop is the

    best when you don’t have

    professional photography

    l ights , so take advantage of

    good weather. 

    • I f you need to re ly on indoor

    l ight ing, avoid coloured l ight

    bulbs, i f possible , st ick with

    neutral or cool white.

    • When composing the shot ,

    move your l ights or your

    subject so the key l ight is

    h i t t ing the subject from a

    45° angle , and from a height

    s l ight ly above the subject ’s

    head. Think Rembrandt !

    • Some l ight ing issues can

    be sor ted by adjust ing the

    Aper ture (p.13) , Shutter

    Speed (p.15) or the ISO

    (p.17 ) .

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 6

    EQUIPMENT & SETTINGS

    C A M E R ADSLR cameras are preferred, but you can also use a POINT-AND-

    SHOT camera or i f you don’t have one, use your SMART PHONE .

    L E N S E S | F O C A L L E N G T H

    YOUR LENSES CHOICE HAVE A BIG IMPACT ON THE IMAGE THAT

    YOU WOULD LIKE TO ACHIEVE.

    A WIDE-ANGLE LENS has a

    shor ter focal length (e .g. , 20

    mm), which you can include

    more scenery in your image.

    But i t a lso expands the space

    v isual ly, so everything looks

    far ther apar t . This is why

    people use wide angle lenses

    for proper ty photos.

    A LONG LENS , or te lephoto,

    has a longer focal length (e .g. ,

    200 mm), which lets you get

    a c lose-up shot whi le being

    far away from your subject .

    I t compresses the space,

    making background objects

    look bigger and closer to the

    foreground objects than they

    physical ly are. I t a lso produces

    a shal lower depth of f ie ld

    despite your aper ture sett ing,

    which is good i f you want to

    put more emphasis on your

    foreground subject and blur

    out a bor ing background. Or to

    frame out undesired objects in

    the background.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 7

    A NORMAL LENS (e .g. , 35

    mm or 50 mm, depending on

    your camera sensor) has the

    perspect ive most s imi lar to

    human vis ion. This is why i t

    is commonly used for por trait

    shots , prof i le p ictures or

    interviews.

    When choosing the focal

    length, i t is important to

    decide based on your v is ion

    (composit ion) and also the

    environment ’s l imits. For

    example , with a long lens, i t

    might be dif f icult to move

    your camera so far back in a

    t ight studio space. And though

    a super wide-angle lens can

    include more of the studio , i t

    may miniatur ise your pr imary

    subject and diminish i ts

    s ignif icance in the image.

    Wide-angle lens

    Normal lens Long lens

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 8

    • Ideal minimum width is

    2880 pixels (s ize of our

    banners) , the higher the

    better.

    • I f you have previous images

    in smal ler s ize , do send

    them over as we can use

    them for our blog.

    • Where possible , take your

    photos in RAW . This type

    of f i le contains more colour

    data , so you can edit them

    better.

    • JPG are also welcome,

    note that these f i les are

    compressed, so there are

    less colour data contained

    in the f i le for touch-ups.

    • Make sure you select the

    format you are comfor table

    to work with so you can edit

    your photos with ease.

    R E S O L U T I O N

    F I L E F O R M A T

    • Use a tr ipod to compose

    your shot , and to avoid

    gett ing blurry images under

    a low l ight condit ion. 

    • I f you don’t have one, set

    up your camera upr ight on

    a f lat surface using tape or

    support i t with objects on

    your desk.   

    • I f you need to hand-hold

    your camera, keep this in

    mind: I f you are using a

    100mm lens on a ful l f rame

    camera, the s lowest shutter

    speed we recommend is

    1/100. I f you are using a

    400mm lens, the minimum

    shutter speed recommended

    is 1/400.

    T R I P O D

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 9

    LIGHTS HAVE COLOURS WHICH AFFECT THE COLOUR OF

    OBJECTS IN YOUR PHOTO. WHITE BALANCE IS A WAY FOR YOUR

    CAMERA TO ADJUST ITSELF AND COMPENSATE FOR THAT

    COLOUR DIFFERENCE.

    Use Custom White Balance for perfect colours:

    W H I T E B A L A N C E | C O L O U R T E M P E R A T U R E

    Hold up a piece of white

    paper r ight in front of your

    main subject/object , say

    the ar t ist ’s face or a bucket

    of paint brushes, so al l the

    l ights that were hitt ing your

    subject/object , are now

    hitt ing the white paper.

    Move your camera closer

    and take a photo of the

    white paper, and make sure

    the white paper covers the

    ent i re image.

    Act ivate your camera’s

    custom white balance

    feature.

    Select this image, and your

    camera should update

    one of your custom white

    balance colour prof i les.

    Don’t forget to select the

    updated white balance

    colour prof i le before

    you star t shoot ing. This

    par t icular white balance

    colour prof i le is only

    suitable under this specif ic

    and consistent l ight ing

    condit ion. I f you change

    locat ion, or the l ight ing

    condit ion changes, you

    wi l l have to go through the

    whole process again.

    For detailed instructions to do this, search online for  “Custom White Balance” with your camera’s model number (e.g., “Custom White Balance Canon 70D”).

    1 .

    2 .

    3.

    4.

    5.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 10

    • Wipe the lens before

    shooting. 

    • Take some test shots and

    f l ip between images to

    see i f there are any last ing

    stains. I f there are , i t means

    your sensor is d ir ty and you

    may need to get i t c leaned

    before shoot ing.

    • Don’t use f lash, unless you

    are a professional . Try to

    sor t out l ight ing issues with

    other resources pointed out

    in this guide.

    • Use the self - t imer for

    sharper photos. 

    • Make use of the rule

    of thirds. This involves

    mental ly d iv id ing up your

    image using 2 hor izontal

    l ines and 2 ver t ical l ines.

    You then posit ion the

    important e lements in your

    scene along those l ines, or

    at the points where they

    meet. Your phone or camera

    usual ly have a default gr id

    (or turn i t on in the sett ings)

    to use as a guidel ine when

    shoot ing. This is i l lustrated

    on the next page.

    • Use leading l ines. This is a

    technique of composit ion

    where the v iewer of your

    photos attent ion is drawn

    to l ines that lead to the

    main subject of the image.

    A leading l ine paves an easy

    path for the eye to fol low

    through different e lements

    of a photo. Find an example

    on the next page.

    TOP TIPS

    G E N E R A L T I P S

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 11

    A R T W O R K T I P S

    • Set up a s ingle , consistent

    place to photograph your

    work.

    • Make sure i t ’s wel l l i t ,

    preferably with indirect

    natural l ight ing. Do not use

    f lash.

    • Avoid deep shadows,

    tonal inconsistencies and

    dappl ing effects.

    • A tr ipod is a must.

    • Camera should be at the

    same height as the centre

    of your ar twork. 

    • I f your ar twork leans at an

    angle , the angle of your lens

    should be paral le l to the

    ar twork. 

    • Set the ISO to 200 and make

    sure you custom white

    balance your image, so the

    colour inf luence on your

    ar tworks are minimal .

    • Frame in the ar twork with

    at least 10% margin in a l l

    d i rect ions. Make sure you

    crop this in post-product ion.

    • I f you’ve framed your

    ar twork , photograph i t and

    crop i t to look at how i t wi l l

    be when i t ’s shipped i .e .

    with the frame in the shot.

    Crop the image to the outer

    edges of the frame.

    Use of the rule of thirds grid Use of leading lines for composition

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 12

    • I t ’s good pract ice to take

    as many detai l photographs

    as possible. We would

    recommend taking at least 3

    to 4 detai led c lose-up

    • Take an instal lat ion shot

    (perhaps in a gal lery, your

    studio or instal led in an

    inter ior) . I f you can’t do this ,

    a wel l photomontage with

    the r ight scale is a good

    opt ion.

    Artwork Image

    Artwork Installation

    Artwork Detail Artwork Detail

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 13

    CAMERA MODE

    When your camera is in

    AUTOMATIC MODE (Auto

    on the dial ) , you have no

    creat ive control as the camera

    determines everything based

    on what i t sees. 

    In MANUAL MODE (M) , you

    can adjust each control based

    on your creat ive v is ion. I f you

    are conf ident in this mode,

    you might want to skip this

    sect ion.

    I f you are not ready to go

    ful l manual yet , there are

    APERTURE PRIORITY MODE (A

    or Av) and SHUTTER PRIORITY

    MODE (S or Tv) , which give you

    a degree of creat ive freedom

    with assistance from your

    camera.

    Here are some basic things

    you need to know:

    When taking a photograph,

    there are 3 e lements that work

    together to control how br ight

    or dark your photo is (known

    as exposure) , as wel l as

    change the overal l look of the

    image.

    • APERTURE – the s ize of the

    opening in the lens which

    controls the amount of l ight

    that enters the camera body.

    • SHUTTER SPEED – the

    amount of t ime that the

    shutter stays open to let the

    l ight in .

    • ISO – determines a digita l

    camera sensor ’s sensit iv i ty

    to l ight .

    IF YOU’RE NOT AN EXPERT WITH YOUR CAMERA BUT STILL

    WANT TO GET PHOTOGRAPHS THAT LOOK PROFESSIONAL,

    THERE ARE WAYS TO ACHIEVE THIS.

    WAYS TO ACHIEVE A PROFESSIONAL LOOK BY MAKING THE

    MOST OF YOUR CAMERA SETTINGS

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 14

    A P E R T U R E P R I O R I T Y M O D EIn this mode, you wil l need to set your aperture (F/number) ,

    and ISO, but the camera automatical ly sets the shutter speed .

    I t wi l l g ive you control over the depth of f ie ld ( the amount of

    b lur effect that you want in your photo) with access to exposure

    compensat ion, so you can control br ightness.

    Situat ions where using Aper ture pr ior i ty can be helpful :

    PORTRAITS

    • While taking por trait or

    c lose-up shots , you might

    want to keep the subject

    in focus and blur out the

    background by choosing

    a large aper ture (smal l f/

    number) .

    • Use f/1.8 or f/2.8 to achieve

    a shal low depth of f ie ld

    (blur background effect) .

    LOW LIGH

    Low l ight condit ion can make

    your photos underexposed.

    By opening the aper ture

    (select ing a smal ler aper ture

    value l ike f/1.8 ) , you can al low

    more l ight into the camera

    and capture a better-exposed

    photo.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 15

    • While shoot ing landscapes

    or c i tyscapes, you might

    want to have both the

    foreground and the

    background in focus. This

    is only possible i f you use a

    smal l aper ture sett ing (high

    f/number) .

    • Use f/16 or f/22 to get a

    deep depth of f ie ld (more

    objects are in focus) .

    MIDDAY BRIGHT SUNLIGHT

    • I f you are shoot ing in broad

    dayl ight and are gett ing

    overexposed photos whi le

    shoot ing in automatic mode,

    you can reduce the aper ture

    s ize. This means that by

    using a higher aper ture

    number ( l ike f/16 ) , you can

    minimise the amount of

    l ight enter ing the camera.

    STUDIO | LANDSCAPE ( if you work outdoors)

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 16

    S H U T T E R P R I O R I T Y M O D E

    Shutter Prior ity mode al lows you to take charge of the shutter

    speed. Shutter speed is the durat ion at which the camera’s

    shutter remains open for l ight to enter the camera and be

    captured by the sensor. The slower the shutter speed is , the

    more the l ight is received by the image sensor. The faster the

    shutter speed, the less l ight would hit the image sensor.

    Situat ions to use Shutter Pr ior i ty Mode:

    • I f you want to freeze a fast-

    moving subject/object e .g. ,

    a drop of paint) you wi l l

    need to use a fast shutter

    speed in order to capture

    the moment.

    • A shutter speed of anything

    faster than 1/500th of a

    second is considered ideal

    for f reezing an object , but

    this may vary depending on

    the speed of the subject .

    Your camera wi l l adjust the

    required aper ture and ISO

    values. (You can set this in

    auto mode.)

    FREEZE A MOVING SUBJECT OR OBJECT

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 17

    SHOWING MOVEMENT

    • I f you want to capture

    movement (e .g. Someone

    walking in a studio) , you

    wi l l have to select a s low

    shutter speed so that

    the subject ’s movement

    is captured in the s ingle

    photo. To capture long

    exposure photos, you must

    use a tr ipod to avoid any

    camera shake.

    LOW LIGHT

    I f you are in low l ight

    condit ion, you might get

    underexposed photos whi le

    shoot ing in automatic mode.

    By s imply reducing the shutter

    speed (e.g. , from 1/200th to

    1/50th ) , you can al low more

    l ight into the camera and

    capture a wel l -exposed photo.

    BROAD DAYLIGHT

    • Shooting in broad dayl ight

    in automatic mode can

    result in overexposed

    photos. Here you should

    increase the shutter speed

    (e.g. , f rom 1/200th to

    1/1000th ) , and minimise the

    amount of l ight enter ing the

    camera body.

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 18

    ISO represents the sensor ’s sensit iv i ty to l ight . The lower the

    number the less sensit ive your camera is to l ight , and the less

    f i lm grain you wi l l have in the image.

    • Higher numbers mean your

    sensor becomes more

    sensit ive to l ight , which

    al lows you to use your

    camera in darker s i tuat ions

    without changing your

    shutter speed, aper ture or

    adding more l ights , result ing

    in a grainier image.

    • 100 ISO is general ly

    accepted as the ‘standard’

    ISO and wi l l g ive you cr isp

    shots (with l i t t le to no

    noise/grain) . I f possible ,

    keep your ISO under 200 at

    al l t imes .

    I S O

    100

    6400

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 19

    EXAMPLE IMAGES

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 20

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 21

  • A R T I S T A S S E T S G U I D E - R I S E A R T 22

  • I f you have any quest ion or need some help please contact us at

    [email protected]

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