Animated Adventures KS2

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Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures

A Teaching ResourceHerbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Contents

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Visiting: Independent - Animated Adventures Curriculum connections and Learning Outcomes Resources Teachers Notes Image Bank Supporting Documents Zoetrope Make Your Own Zoetrope Thaumatrope Make Your Own Thaumatrope Storyboard Skills Glossary Useful links

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Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Visiting: Independent Visit - Animated Adventures 01INTRODUCTIONSession length: 1 hour Session Description: KS2 Cost: Free Its time to get animated in our latest exhibition, Animated Adventures, presented by W5. Explore, investigate and discover the world of animation in this temporary exhibition using our self-led resources, designed by our Learning Team along with the interactive games and activities in the gallery. The resources help to encourage exploration, discussion, questioning and thinking surrounding the topic of animation. You can also take part in our storyboard activity using the ready-made template, which you can take back to school to display and use for follow-up activities. Animated Adventures will be at The Herbert from 24th October to 17th January, book now to avoid disappointment. This teachers resource pack has been designed to support the KS2 school curriculum. Within the pack you will find a selection of cross curricular activities supporting the development of key skills and other useful resources to compliment your work in the classroom. The activities are suitable to be carried out pre or post visit to the Herbert and we strongly recommend a visit to the museum to get the most out of your pack. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Learning Outcomes Increased ability to ask questions and collect information relevant to the focus of enquiry. Opportunities to collect visual and other information to further develop ideas. Higher knowledge of the roles and purposes of artists, craftspeople, designers and animators. Developed exploration of a range of starting points for practical work. Improved speaking and listening through group discussion and interaction. Higher ability for giving shape and organisation to written work. Development of planning and drafting in preparation for final layouts of work.

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Curriculum Connections and Learning Outcomes 02Further exploration of how to convey ideas, feelings and emotions through creative text whilst improving skills for increasing reader interest. A broader vocabulary which they can use in inventive ways. Improved writing and presentations skills. Skills for using a variety of methods to convey ideas and designs. Opportunity to apply their experience of materials and processes to develop and control their own practical work. Further knowledge of materials and processes and how these can be used to match ideas and intentions.

Opportunity to prepare a neat, correct and clear final copy of written work.

Put all of the storyboards together to make one big sequence - how will this work? Can the frames from each storyboard be mixed together to make a story that has a start, middle and an ending?

Create new illustrations for the thaumatrope and zoetrope templates. Make the storyboard into a comic book.

Using the storyboard from the visit to The Herbert, turn it into a full length, written story.

Literacy

Art and Design

Using plasticine or modelling clay, create characters for the storyboard activities.

Increased knowledge of historical objects and an increased ability to make links between these objects with present day.

Zoetropes and thaumatropes were highly popular in Victorian times as toys and entertainment - what other toys were popular in the Victorian period? Do they still exist today? Have they been adapted or replaced with something else?

Animated AdventuresHistory DramaAct out scenes from the storyboard developed at The Herbert. What equipment would be needed to make a stop-motion film? - Make a film using models from the storyboard

Citizenship Design and TechnologyResearch the job roles required for making an animation.

Opportunity to create, adapt and sustain different roles, individually or in groups.

Explore new ways to make zoetropes and thaumatropes move - what tools and methods could be used?

Higher knowledge of the roles and purposes involved in different jobs.

Higher ability for using characters, actions and narrative for conveying stories, themes, emotions and ideas.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Improved skills for working independently and collaborating with other on projects in two and three dimensions.

An increased understanding of tools and materials, how they are used and what they are used for.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Teachers Notes 03AnimationAnimations are created when images of 2D artworks or 3D models are rapidly shown in a sequence, which creates an illusion of movement. Computer Animation: There are two types of computer animation, which are 2D and 3D animations. 2D animations use similar processes to traditional animations, but the frames are enhanced and edited using computer programmes. Animations such as Danny Phantom and Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends use 2D animation processes. 3D animations build a virtual world digitally and create characters and objects that are much more realistic. Films such as Shrek, Toy Story and Finding Nemo are excellent examples of 3D animations.

Types of AnimationTradional Animation: This type of animation refers to the oldest and historically the most popular and well known form of animation, where animations are drawn by hand, frame by frame. We refer to these animations more commonly as cartoons, with famous examples of tradtional animations being Cinderella, Tom and Jerry and The Simpsons. Stop Motion: Stop motion animation is when real objects are moved slightly for each frame for the sequence and then filmed or photgraphed, paused and the process is then repeated. Well known animations that use the stop motion technique are Wallace and Gromit, Coraline, Pingu and Bob the Builder. These still frames are then rapidly shown, one after the other, to make a moving picture.

How do we Capture Movement?A trick of the human eye called the persistence of vision allows our eyes and our brain to work together to capture a still image in a split second of time. When this still image is followed with another image that is slightly different our brain puts the two images together and we see it as a movement. These images have to follow-on from each other very quickly, otherwise our brain would have time to register the images as two seperates pictures.

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITIONThis is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, The Curse of the Were Rabbit. Overall the film took five years to make, with only five seconds of film being completed per week but each animator. This shows how long the process of animation can be and how much detail goes into to making all of the sets, scenes and filming perfect and ready for the final film production. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITIONThis is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, The Curse of the Were Rabbit. The model-making department for this film consited of 40 talented individuals, who used a special blend of plasticine called Aard Mix to create the characters and objects featured throughout the film and can now be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITIONThis is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, The Curse of the Were Rabbit. Altogether over 500 rabbits were made for this film, 43 versions of Gromit and 35 versions of Wallace. Each character featured in this film recieved a new set of eyes, on average, every two months. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03ZOETROPEA zoetrope is a drum shaped optical toy that turns still images into a moving animation. It was invented by W.G Horner in 1834 and then later developed by Milton Bradley who patented it in 1867. Images are printed or drawn onto a piece of paper that runs the length of the zoetropes circumference, with each image being slightly different from the previous one. This is then secured into place inside of the zoetropes drum. The drum has slits in it that are evenly spaced out; thi