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All babies cry. Crying is communication that your baby needs something from you. Colic is crying that is unexplained, not easily resolved, occurs daily, at the same time (usually in the evening) and is excessive and upsetting to parents. About 1 in 5 babies suffer from colic. Colic only occurs in young babies. Although there is no clear explanation for colic, pediatricians think that this type of infant crying can be caused by: Overstimulation, affecting babies who are especially sensitive to noises, lights and changes in the environment around them Mild food allergies, like a breastfed baby reacting to something passing through the milk (such as dairy) Discomfort from a medical problem such as a hernia or acid reflux If you think your baby has colic, here are some suggestions: 1. Consult with your baby’s medical provider to rule out a medical reason for crying. 2. If you are breastfeeding, experiment with eliminating foods that are common allergens: milk products, caffeine, onions, cabbage, or any other potentially irritating foods. Eliminate one food at a time so you can determine which food is causing the problem. If you are bottle-feeding your baby, talk to your baby’s medical provider about switching to a formula that does not contain cow’s milk. The colic will decrease, or disappear completely, within 3–7 days after eliminating a food if a sensitivity is causing the crying. 3. Experiment with a variety of soothing techniques. Wear your baby, bounce on an exercise ball, rock in a rocking chair, use white noise or the vacuum, try an infant swing, car ride, or any other creative strategies that could soothe your baby. 4. Offer your baby a pacifier. For some babies sucking provides relief. If you are breastfeeding, introduce the pacifier after your baby has learned to feed well at the breast. 5. Try new positions. Lay your baby on her tummy and rub her back, put your baby high over your shoulder with her belly on your shoulder, or try the football hold. Colic

All babies cry. Crying is communication that your baby ......• Discomfort from a medical problem such as a hernia or acid reflux If you think your baby has colic, here are some suggestions:

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Page 1: All babies cry. Crying is communication that your baby ......• Discomfort from a medical problem such as a hernia or acid reflux If you think your baby has colic, here are some suggestions:

All babies cry. Crying is communication that your baby

needs something from you. Colic is crying that is

unexplained, not easily resolved, occurs daily, at the

same time (usually in the evening) and is excessive and

upsetting to parents.

About 1 in 5 babies suffer from colic. Colic only occurs in young babies. Although there is no clear explanation for colic, pediatricians think that this type of infant crying can be caused by:

• Overstimulation, affecting babies who are especially sensitive to noises, lights and changes in the environment around them

• Mild food allergies, like a breastfed baby reacting to something passing through the milk (such as dairy)

• Discomfort from a medical problem such as a hernia or acid reflux

If you think your baby has colic, here are some suggestions:

1. Consult with your baby’s medical provider to rule out a medical reason for crying.

2. If you are breastfeeding, experiment with eliminating foods that are common allergens: milk products, caffeine, onions, cabbage, or any other potentially irritating foods. Eliminate one food at a time so you can determine which food is causing the problem. If you are bottle-feeding your baby, talk to your baby’s medical provider about switching to a formula that does not contain cow’s milk. The colic will decrease, or disappear completely, within 3–7 days after eliminating a food if a sensitivity is causing the crying.

3. Experiment with a variety of soothing techniques. Wear your baby, bounce on an exercise ball, rock in a rocking chair, use white noise or the vacuum, try an infant swing, car ride, or any other creative strategies that could soothe your baby.

4. Offer your baby a pacifier. For some babies sucking provides relief. If you are breastfeeding, introduce the pacifier after your baby has learned to feed well at the breast.

5. Try new positions. Lay your baby on her tummy and rub her back, put your baby high over your shoulder with her belly on your shoulder, or try the football hold.

Colic

Page 2: All babies cry. Crying is communication that your baby ......• Discomfort from a medical problem such as a hernia or acid reflux If you think your baby has colic, here are some suggestions:

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6. Experiment with gentle pressure. Swaddle your baby or experiment with infant massage.

7. Ask for help caring for your baby if you are feeling anxious or exhausted.

8. If your baby continues to cry despite your best efforts, remember colic does not last forever. Use earplugs to dampen the intensity of the sound so you can stay calm. Ask for help. If there is someone else who can hold your baby while she cries, leave the house and get away from the crying for 20 minutes or an hour. You will do your best if you alternate caring for her and taking breaks. If you are feeling frustrated and no one can help, put your baby down in a safe place and take a short break. It is better to take a break, rather than risk getting so frustrated that you shake your baby.

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