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    CHILDREN'S BOOKCOLLECTIONLIBRARY OF THE

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIALOS ANGELES

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    Aesops Fables

    By Grace Rhys

    Illustrated by Charles Robinson

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    World Public Library

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    THEBANBURY CROSSSERIES

    PREPARED FOR CHILDREN BY GRACE RHYS

    JESOP'S FABLES

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    1LLV3TRHTED BYKOB1W5ON* ' * *

    BT'

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    To Enid., this is ^Esop's house,

    And the cover is the door ;When the rains of winter pour,Then the Lion and the Mouse,And the Frogs that asked a king,And all the Beasts with curious features,That talk just like us human creatures,Open it, and ask you in !

    G. R.

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    A CONCEITED jackdaw was vainenough to imagine that he wantednothing but the coloured plumes to makehim as beautiful a bird as the Peacock.Puffed up with this wise conceit, hedressed himself with a quantity of theirfinest feathers, and in this borrowed garb,leaving his old companions, tried to passfor a peacock; but he no sooner at-tempted to stray with these splendidbirds, than an affected strut betrayedthe sham. The offended peacocks fellupon him with their beaks, and soonstripped him of his finery. Havingturned him again into a mere jackdaw,they drove him back to his brethren,

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    But they, remembering what airs he hadonce given himself, would not permithim to flock with them again, and treatedhim with well-deserved contempt.

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    A DISPUTE once arose between theSun and the Wind, which was thestronger of the two, and they agreedto count this as proof, that whicheversoonest made a traveller take off hiscloak, should be held the most powerful.The wind began, and blew with all hismight and main a blast, cold and fierceas a winter storm ; but the stronger heblew, the closer the traveller wrappedhis cloak about him, and the tighter hegrasped it with his hands. Then brokeout the sun : with his welcome beamshe chased away the vapour and the cold ;the traveller felt the pleasant warmth,and as the sun shone brighter andbrighter, he sat down, overcome by theheat, and cast aside the cloak that allthe blustering rage of the wind could

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    not compel him to lay down. "Learnfrom this," said the sun to the wind," that soft and gentle means will oftenbring about, what force and fury never

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    A DOG made his bed in a manger, andlay snarling and growling to keep

    the horses from their provender. " See,"said one of them, "what a miserablecur ! who neither can eat corn himself,nor will allow those to eat it who can."

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    A WOODMAN was felling a treeon the bank of a river; and bychance let his axe slip from his hand,which dropped into the water and im-mediately sank to the bottom. Beingtherefore in great distress, he sat downby the side of the stream and bewailedhis loss. Upon this, Mercury, whoseriver it was, had compassion on him,and appearing before him asked thecause of his sorrow. On hearing it,he dived to the bottom of the river,and coming up again, showed the man agolden hatchet, and asked if that werehis. He said that it was not. ThenMercury dived a second time, andbrought up a silver one. The wood-man refused it, saying again that thiswas not his. So he dived a third time,

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    and brought up the very axe that hadbeen lost.

    " That is mine ! " said the Wood-man, delighted to have his own again.Mercury was so pleased with his honestythat he made him a present of theother two, as a reward for his justdealing.The man goes to his companions,

    and giving them an account of whathad happened to him, one of themdetermined to try whether he mightnot have the like good fortune. Sohe went presently to the river's sideand let his axe fall on purpose intothe stream. Then he sat down on thebank and made a great show of weep-ing. Mercury appeared as before, anddiving, brought up a golden axe. "Whenhe asked if that were the one thatwas lost, " Aye, surely ! " said theman, and snatched at it greedily. But

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    Mercury, to punish his impudence andlying, not only refused to give himthat, but would not so much as lethim have his own axe again.

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    A FOX one day invited a Stork todinner, and being disposed todivert himself at the expense of hisguest, provided nothing for dinner butsome thin soup in a shallow dish. Thisthe Fox lapped up very readily, whilethe Stork, unable to gain a mouthfulwith her long narrow bill, was ashungry

    at the end of dinner as whenshe began. The Fox, meanwhile, saidhe was very sorry to see her eat sosparingly, and hoped that the dish wasseasoned to her mind. The Stork, see-ing that she was played upon, took nonotice of it, but pretended to enjoyherself extremely ; and at parting beggedthe Fox to return the visit. So he agreedto dine with her the next day. He

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    ordered forthwith ; but when it wasserved up, he found to his dismay, thatit was nothing but minced meat in atall, narrow-necked jar. Down this theStork easily thrust her long neck andbill, while the Fox had to content him-self with licking the outside of the jar." I am very glad," said the Stork, " thatyou seem to have so good an appetite;and I hope you will make as hearty adinner at my table as I did the otherday at yours." At this the Fox hungdown his head and showed his teeth"Nay, nay," said the Stork, "don'tpretend to be out of humour about thematter ; they that cannot take a jestshould never make one."

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