Advanced DSLR lecture - DSLR Features Exposure Triangle Changing Speed/Aperture • When you move shutter

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Advanced DSLR lecture - DSLR Features Exposure Triangle Changing Speed/Aperture • When you...

  • Using Advanced DSLR Features

    Exposure Triangle

    Changing Speed/Aperture • When you move shutter speed or aperture

    dials on the camera body, each click is 1/3 stop.

    • 3 clicks = 1 stop

    White Button Check • Before going out to shoot, do a “white

    button” check.

    • ISO, speed, aperture, white balance

    • Did you forget to turn off bracketing?

    • Be able to find buttons in the dark!

    • Do you have a battery? A formatted card?

    Shutter Speed • Reciprocal shutter speed rule. Minimum

    shutter speed should be equal to or greater than 1/focal length of lens.

    • Wide angle lens up to “normal” lens use speed > 1/60 s

    • 100 mm - 150 mm use 1/300-400 s

    • telephoto lens (say 200-300 mm) use 1/600-800-… s

    • To achieve proper speed with appropriate depth of field (lens dependent), you may need to raise ISO.

    https://photographylife.com/what-is-reciprocal-rule-in-photography

    Shutter Speed • Reciprocal shutter speed rule. Minimum

    shutter speed should be equal to or greater than 1/focal length of lens.

    200 mm50 mm 400 mm

  • Usable ISO The chart shows the maximum useable ISO for given cameras introduced over the last 12 years. Notice how the dots are higher on the chart the further you go to the right.  The newer cameras are to the right of the graph and the tests show that they can shoot at higher ISO values with less digital noise.

    Usable ISO • Start with ISO 200 in “normal” conditions.

    • To capture a flying bird, may need to use higher ISO

    (say 800-1000) to have high enough shutter speed.

    • With newer cameras you can easily go to ISO 1600

    or even higher (and use Lightroom or Nik software

    to filter noise).

    ISO 100, 340 mm, f/8, 1/500 s ISO 800, 340 mm, f/9, 1/1000 s

    ISO 1000, 340 mm, f/7.1, 1/4000 s ISO 1600, 35 mm, f/7.1, 13.0 s 
on tripod, in moonlight

  • ISO 3200, 35 mm, f/4,

    1/60

    Use AUTO ISO

    AUTO ISO • Nikon calls it “Auto ISO sensitivity control” (in the

    Shooting Menu). Camera will find ISO (up to spec’d

    max value) that gives best photo under conditions

    set.

    ISO you have set

    Max ISO allowed Minimum speed that satisfies reciprocal rule.

    Auto-Focus: Mode Groups There are 3 MODE GROUPS

    • Autofocus Modes: how it focuses

    • Single (AF-S) and continuous (AF-C)

    • AF-Area Modes: where it focuses

    • Single point, Dynamic area (9, 21, 51 points), 3D- tracking, Group, Auto-area

    • Release Modes: when it focuses

    • Single frame, continuous (H and L), Quiet, Self- timer, MUP

    Auto-Focus: Mode Groups • Single (AF-S) used when subject is not

    moving.

    • Remember you can move the focus point around in the viewer.

    • Nikon now has AF-S, Group Mode. Especially good in Face Detection mode.

    Auto-Focus: Mode Groups • (AF-C) used when subject is moving.

    • Can use 9, 21, or 51 points to focus.

    • 3D-Tracking: Camera not only tracks by subject area but also remembers the color of the subject and uses that it track even more accurately.

    • Auto-Area: “…turns the camera into an expensive point and shoot camera. … This is a great people mode.”

    Back-Button Focus

    http://www.backcountrygallery.com/photography_tips/af-on-and-back-button-autofocus/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzqQskGoURE

  • White Balance

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/white-balance.htm

    White Balance • Auto WB works quite well on most cameras.

    • If you save images as JPEG files, then you have to be careful about WB.

    • If you save as RAW files, then WB is of no immediate concern.

    • NOTE: the image you see on your camera back is a JPEG. The RAW file sent to image processing can look substantially different.

    White Balance

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/white-balance.htm

    White Balance

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/white-balance.htm

    White Balance • Some situations make it difficult to achieve

    the correct white balance. Three solutions:

    • Use white balance card

    • Use WB adjustment dropper in Lightroom

    • Use “Live View” and “dial in” the correct WB using the K setting on the camera.

    Using the Histogram

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/histograms1.htm

  • Histograms & ETTR • Each vertical line in the graph represents the number of

    pixels in the image for each brightness value, from 0 (black) on the left to 255 (white) on the right. The vertical axis measures the number of pixels at each level.

    • A 12 bit sensor captures 4096 bits of data per channel.

    • Half of the 4096 levels are devoted the brightest stop, half of the remainder (1024) to the next brightest, half of the remainder (512) to the next stop, and so on.

    • This is the basis of the idea of ETTR - expose to the right

    Histograms & ETTR • ETTR - Expose to the Right

    • Because most of the information captured by the sensor is at the brighter end, it is better to bias the exposure to the right (bright) end.

    • For an example of this see:

    • https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=wuwfNhyXDGQ&feature=plcp

    ETTR Expose to the Right

    • https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=wuwfNhyXDGQ&feature=plcp

    • OTHER relevant websites:

    • http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/ gamma-correction.htm

    • http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/ gamma-correction.htm