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  • Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information TechnologyAuthor(s): Fred D. DavisSource: MIS Quarterly, Vol. 13, No. 3 (Sep., 1989), pp. 319-340Published by: Management Information Systems Research Center, University of MinnesotaStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/249008 .Accessed: 25/10/2014 06:44

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  • IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use IT Usefulness and Ease of Use

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, and User Acceptance of Information Technology

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information Systems Graduate School of Business

    Administration University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Abstract Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research de- velops and validates new scales for two spe- cific variables, perceived usefulness and per- ceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user accep- tance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application pro- grams. The measures were refined and stream- lined, resulting in two six-item scales with reli- abilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived use- fulness was significantly correlated with both self- reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r= .85, Study 2). Per- ceived ease of use was also significantly corre- lated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correla- tion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antece-

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information Systems Graduate School of Business

    Administration University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Abstract Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research de- velops and validates new scales for two spe- cific variables, perceived usefulness and per- ceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user accep- tance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application pro- grams. The measures were refined and stream- lined, resulting in two six-item scales with reli- abilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived use- fulness was significantly correlated with both self- reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r= .85, Study 2). Per- ceived ease of use was also significantly corre- lated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correla- tion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antece-

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information Systems Graduate School of Business

    Administration University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Abstract Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research de- velops and validates new scales for two spe- cific variables, perceived usefulness and per- ceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user accep- tance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application pro- grams. The measures were refined and stream- lined, resulting in two six-item scales with reli- abilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived use- fulness was significantly correlated with both self- reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r= .85, Study 2). Per- ceived ease of use was also significantly corre- lated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correla- tion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antece-

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information Systems Graduate School of Business

    Administration University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Abstract Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research de- velops and validates new scales for two spe- cific variables, perceived usefulness and per- ceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user accep- tance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application pro- grams. The measures were refined and stream- lined, resulting in two six-item scales with reli- abilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived use- fulness was significantly correlated with both self- reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r= .85, Study 2). Per- ceived ease of use was also significantly corre- lated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correla- tion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antece-

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information Systems Graduate School of Business

    Administration University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Abstract Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research de- velops and validates new scales for two spe- cific variables, perceived usefulness and per- ceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user accep- tance. Definitions for these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application pro- grams. The measures were refined and stream- lined, resulting in two six-item scales with reli- abilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited high convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived use- fulness was significantly correlated with both self- reported current usage (r=.63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage (r= .85, Study 2). Per- ceived ease of use was also significantly corre- lated with current usage (r=.45, Study 1) and future usage (r=.59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a significantly greater correla- tion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antece-

    By: Fred D. Davis Computer and Information System