Click here to load reader

A STUDY OF SWITCHGRASS PYROLYSIS: PRODUCT ... ... A STUDY OF SWITCHGRASS PYROLYSIS: PRODUCT VARIABILITY AND REACTION KINETICS By Jonathan Matthew Bovee

  • View
    4

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of A STUDY OF SWITCHGRASS PYROLYSIS: PRODUCT ... ......

  •    

           

    A STUDY OF SWITCHGRASS PYROLYSIS: PRODUCT VARIABILITY AND REACTION KINETICS    By   

    Jonathan Matthew Bovee                           

             

    A THESIS   

    Submitted to  Michigan State University 

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements  for the degree of 

      Biosystems Engineering – Master of Science 

      2014 

  •    

    ABSTRACT 

    A STUDY OF SWITCHGRASS PYROLYSIS: PRODUCT VARIABILITY AND REACTION KINETICS    By   

    Jonathan Matthew Bovee     

      Samples of the same cultivar of cave‐in‐rock switchgrass were harvested  from plots  in 

    Frankenmuth, Roger City, Cass County,  and Grand Valley, Michigan.    It was determined  that 

    variation  exists,  between  locations,  among  the  pyrolytic  compounds  which  can  lead  to 

    variability in bio‐oil and increased processing costs at bio‐refineries to make hydrocarbon fuels.  

    Washed  and  extractives‐free  switchgrass  samples, which  contain  a  lower  alkali  and  alkaline 

    earth metals content than untreated samples, were shown to produce lower amounts of acids, 

    esters, furans, ketones, phenolics, and saccharides and also larger amounts of aldehydes upon 

    pyrolysis.  Although the minerals catalyzed pyrolytic reactions, there was no evidence indicating 

    their effect on reducing the production of anhydrosugars, specifically levoglucosan.  To further 

    link minerals present in the biomass to a catalytic pathway, mathematic models were employed 

    to  determine  the  kinetic  parameters  of  the  switchgrass.    While  the  calculated  activation 

    energies  of  switchgrass,  using  the  FWO  and  KAS methods, were  227.7  and  217.8  kJ mol‐1, 

    correspondingly, it was concluded that the activation energies for the switchgrass hemicellulose 

    and cellulose peaks were 115.5 and 158.2 kJ mol‐1, respectively, using a modified model‐fitting 

    method.  The minerals that effect the production of small molecules and levoglucosan also have 

    an observable catalytic effect on switchgrass reaction rate, which may be quantifiable through 

    the  use  of  reaction  kinetics  so  as  to  determine  activation  energy.

  •    

                                             

    Copyright by  JONATHAN MATTHEW BOVEE  2014 

               

  • iv   

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS       

    I would like to thank my family for all of their support throughout my endeavors.  I would also 

    like to personally thank Dr. Bradley Marks, Dr. James Steffe, Dr. Ajit Srivastava, and especially 

    my  advisor,  Dr.  Christopher  Saffron.    This  was  a  wonderful  opportunity  and  I  couldn’t  be 

    happier that I was given a chance to become part of such an exceptional group of  individuals.  

    An  immense  thanks  to Dr. David Hodge and Dr.  James  Jackson, of my  committee, who have 

    been crucial  to my  limited background  in chemistry and have also served as a catalyst  in my 

    renewed interest.  Dr. Kurt Thelen provided intellectual support on the feedstock involved and 

    also  provided  raw materials  needed  for  experiments, without  either  this  research would  be 

    lost.   I would like to thank my friends at the agronomy farm, Bill Widdicombe and Brian Graff, 

    for their help with biomass reconstitution, especially during the absence of time, this is greatly 

    appreciated.  Distinct gratitude is also felt toward Dr. Shantanu Kelkar for all of his vast insight 

    in  the  laboratory,  especially with  the GC/MS.    This  research would  have  not  been  possible 

    without  the help  from my partners at  the North‐Eastern Sun Grant  Initiative, Michigan State 

    University AgBio Research, and  the Great  Lakes Bio‐Energy Research Center.   Thank you, Dr. 

    Zhenglong  Li,  Dr.  Somnath  Bhattacharjee,  Chai  Li,  Mahlet  Garedew,  Rachael  Sak,  Kristine 

    VanWinkle, Nichole  Erickson,  and  Kristine Henn  for  being  such  an  awesome  and  supportive 

    group to work with.   I hope that Barb Delong and Cheryl Feldkamp accept a special thank you 

    for always helping me get where I need to be.  And to all of my professors and friends, please 

    accept a towering thank you for permitting me to learn from you. 

     

  • v   

    TABLE OF CONTENTS        LIST OF TABLES .............................................................................................................................. vii    LIST OF FIGURES .............................................................................................................................. x    INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1    CHAPTER 1 ...................................................................................................................................... 5  LITERATURE REVIEW ...................................................................................................................... 6  1.1 Biomass Composition and Pyrolysis Products ....................................................................... 6  1.2 Effect of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals on Pyrolysis Products  ....................................... 10  1.3 Kinetic Modeling for Pyrolysis of Biomass  ......................................................................... 13 

      CHAPTER 2 .................................................................................................................................... 18  VARIATION IN PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS OF SWITCHGRASS GROWN AT DIFFERENT  LOCATIONS 19  2.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 19  2.2 Materials and Methods ....................................................................................................... 19  2.2.1 Feedstock Analysis ........................................................................................................ 19  2.2.2 Soil Analysis .................................................................................................................. 20  2.2.3 Washing Procedures ..................................................................................................... 21  2.2.4 Py‐GC/MS...................................................................................................................... 21  2.2.5 Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) ............................................................................... 22  2.2.6 Statistical Analysis ........................................................................................................ 23 

    2.3 Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ 23  2.4 Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 27 

      CHAPTER 3 .................................................................................................................................... 29  PYROLYSIS KINETICS OF MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE AND SWITCHGRASS ........................ 30  3.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 30  3.2 Materials and Methods ....................................................................................................... 30  3.3 Theory .................................................................................................................................. 32  3.4 Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ 41  3.4.1 Avicel Kinetics ............................................................................................................... 41  3.4.2 Switchgrass Kinetics ..................................................................................................... 45 

    3.5 Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 56    CHAPTER 4 .................................................................................................................................... 59  CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK ............................................................................................ 60  4.1 General Conclusions ............................................................................................................ 60  4.2 Suggestions for Future Work ............................................................................................... 62 

     

Search related