7 Tips Photographing Food

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Text of 7 Tips Photographing Food

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    photographingfood

    7food PhotograPhy

    tiPs

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Are you having a hard time creating mouthwatering images of food?

    If so, you arent alone.

    Food photography requires a different mindset than portrait, land-scape, sports, wedding, or event photography. Its the only type of photography where your end goal is to make the viewer start to sali-vate and feel a hunger in their stomach.

    If you are just beginning your venture into taking pictures of food, or have had trouble with photographing food, I have some tips that may help you.

    Over the week, take the time and think about how each of these tips can be applied to how you shoot food! In a weeks time, you will see an improvement in your food photography!

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Food looks best with soft even lighting coming from one direction. The easiest way to achieve this is to shoot next to a window. If you are shooting with natural light next to a window, be sure to turn off any oth-er lights in the room. If you are shooting with an artificial light source, try using a lighting modifier that will create a large soft light. This could be a large softbox, umbrella, or even a large white bed sheet! Soft light from one direction will give a beautiful look to your food.

    Tip 1: CreATe A NATurAl lighTiNg look wiTh oNe lighT SourCe

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Has a model ever told you which side is their good side? Like hu-man models, a dish will have a good side. Some dishes will look best when photographed from a head on camera angle. Others will look bet-ter when shot from an overhead angle. If your shot isnt quite looking the way that you would like, try shooting from a different angle.

    Tip 2: Try A differeNT CAmerA ANgle

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Food is full of bright and vibrant colors! Embrace this color when you are shooting. Black and white looks great with portrait photogra-phy, but doesnt work as well when food is the subject. Embrace color harmony and use it to create color schemes that will complement your food and start to make your viewers mouth water.

    Tip 3: embrACe foodS Color

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Using a tripod or other camera support system will improve your photography in two ways. First, a tripod will help stabilize your camera and prevent any motion blur caused by shaky hands when hand hold-ing your camera. Second, when you have the shot almost all the way there, a tripod will allow you to make minor changes in prop and subject placement and keep the framing. This will allow you to create the perfectly com-posed shot every time.

    Tip 4: uSe A Tripod

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    When choosing props, backgrounds, and other styling elements, re-member that less is more. A great food image is one that tells a sto-ry and makes your viewer hungry. Often, using too many props and a cluttered background will distract from this. When choosing your props and backgrounds remember that less is more. Try shooting your dish on several different backgrounds and see which works the best. If you find yourself always using the same background, try breathing new life into your images with a change of scenery.

    Tip 5: leSS iS more

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Do you know how you will use your image after shooting? Is it supposed to fit into a vertical layout? Or does it have to fit in a square crop? Knowing your images final use will help you determine the best way to shoot your subject. Shooting with this final layout in mind will ensure that your propping, styling, and subject wont be cropped out of the final image. If you are unsure of your final usage, try shooting with a few different orientations in mind.

    Tip 6: ShooT wiTh your fiNAl uSe iN miNd

    Here is a bowl of soup with a square crop applied. Notice how the grey area is part of the image that will be cropped out when the square crop is applied.

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    When styling your dish, style it from the camera angle you will be shooting from. If you are going to shoot overhead, look at your dish from an overhead angle while placing garnishes and adjusting your dish. If you are shooting at a head on camera angle, make your ad-justments from this viewpoint. Styling from the camera angle that you intend to use will ensure elements of the image are exactly where they need to be.

    Tip 7: STyle from your ShooTiNg ANgle

  • Want to learn more? Head to www.photographingfood.com Photographs and Content Taylor Mathis

    Are you reAdy To leArN more?

    photographingfood.com is here to help.

    Start improving your food photography today!