1949 November ANCHOR

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Text of 1949 November ANCHOR

  • 1\LPHA SIGMA TAU '

    NOVEMBER 1949

  • NOVEMBER, 1949 VOL. XXV, NO. I

    Subject The President's M essage ..... .. ....... ... .. .......... ..... .... ... ...... .... ... .. ........ ..... .... ...... ......... . The Future of Alpha Sigma T au ... ....... ....... ... .... ....... .. ..... ........ .. ... .. .......... .......... . The Ninth National Convention-Social Events .. ............. ...... .. ..... ... ..... ... .. .......... . Methods Used in New Chapter Expan ion ... .... .. .. ... ... ....... ........... ... ........ .. .. ....... . Alumnae Chapter Expansion ...... ........ .................. .. .. ...... ................ ...... .. ..... .. ........ . National Social Service ...... .... ...... ........ .... ........ .. .' ... ....... .... ... .. ... .. .. ... ..... .. ..... ........... . Original Convention Songs .. .... .... ... .... ... .... ........................... ..... ... ...... ..... .. ........ ... . Minutes of the Constitution Committee ..... ..................... .. ..... ...... ... .. ......... ........ . Minutes of the M eeting of the National Council... ..... ... .... .. ... .... ... ....... ... .. ....... ... . Minutes of the Ninth N ational Convention ............. ... ...... .. ... .. ... .......... ... ..... .. ... . ..

    Page 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 7 8 8

    R eport of the R esolutions Committee...... .... .... .. ... ............. .... ..... ...... ..... ..... ........... 11 R eport of the Nominating Committee..... ..... .......... .... .... ........................ .. ............ 12

  • A SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT mad by Mrs. George Snider D etroit Panhellenic

    President, in her talk at the national convention of Alpha Sigma T au is that much

    of the success of a national sorority depends upon alumnae coopera tion. This is an

    idea to which we should pay particular heed.

    Let us look at some Alpha Sigma T au statistics. According to the annual report

    for last year there are 460 members act ive in alumnae ch apters out of 1,200 who

    have been initiated into alumnae chapters. In other words, about 35 % of the life members are actively interes ted in the affairs of the sorority and are contributing to

    its growth by their alumnae chapter membership.

    At the ninth national convention a policy for alumnae membership was adopted.

    Every alumna of the sorority is to be affiliated with her home alumnae chapter,

    either as an active member participating in all of its activities, or as an associate

    member living too far away to attend meetings, but contributing to its program and

    receiving notice of its activities to the extent tha t the chapter decides. This plan will

    give the other 65 % of the life members, and all other alumnae-at-large a chance to

    help the sorority grow.

    .

    Expansion is not limited in meaning to more new chapters . The sorority can grow

    in many ways-in loyalty of its members, in more efficient execution of its program,

    in a larger philanthropic purpose, and in attainment of its ideals.

    The convention delegates and the national council can plan for expansion, but

    before anything can be accomplished Alpha Sigma T au needs you-your upport

    and interest in its program. Send your contribution for the na tional social service

    and expansion funds. Write to your alumnae chapter today and tell them tha t ou

    want to help!

  • THE ANCHOR 3

    The Future of Alpha Sigma Tau CARRIE w. STAEHLE

    (Address at Ninth National Convention)

    THIS morning we are to consider some business aspects of the sorority. Without some serious thinking concerning our organ-ization we would not have a sorority with its conventions and parties such as the fine one we had last night.

    To a certain extent we shall open our chapters this fall in much the same way as we always have. We shall plan rushing par-ties and social activities becau,se part of our purpose is social; we shall plan for cultural program meetings because part of our pur-pose is cultural; we shall plan for pledge training, studies in courtesy, and work in social service because the third part of our purpose is ethical.

    The p rogress in our cui tural and ethical program is growing each year, and the re-sults are most gratifying. In reading the con-stitution, which I mentioned yesterday, in the first green suede notebook-and the paragraphs in the college year books, it is interesting to note that the first chapters also stressed attainment of ethical and cul-tural aims. In the 1902 year book we read:

    "We have but one life to live and we all wish to make the most of it. The question a t once arises: "How can we accomplish the most with the energies and powers at our command?" For three years we have sought to solve the problem, and we feel that through our organization we have been enabled to accomplish much in the way of solution.

    The years of our college life have brought us into a true realization of the fact that "a friend is the noblest gift life can bring".

    We have satisfactorily proved to our-selves that true friendship and culture in sorority life is "woRTH WHILE". Our hearts' desire is, that those who are left to carry on the work of next year may be the means of forming links which time and change cannot sever." It seems to some of us, that if we are to

    convince colleges of the value of sororities we must make our whole purpose function. In the Journal of the National Association of

    Deans of Women, Dr. Esther Lloyd Jon s from Columbia University writes on Social Competence of T eachers. Sh says:

    "Social competence implies pozse and composure in social situations, grooming and good taste, a knowledge of etiquette, and ability to hold one's own with small talk that serves communication purpos s in the group of which one would like to be a member." She stated, "The sad part about our American culture is that about half our population doesn' t get a fair chance to learn social competence on this level, and far too many of the other half can't get beyond it."

    On a more mature level, social com-petence has to do with ability to get be-yond self, to gain reliable perspective on self in relation to other persons, the ability to understand, to appreciate and to be useful to an ever widening group of peo-ple." The last paragraph fits almost line for line

    with our Creed in which we speak of the ful-fillment of self and our contribution to the service of mankind. If then, college feel that social competence is not being de-~eloped, especially among teachers, let's strive even harder to plan for social om-petence in our sorority program.

    Besides considering our place in the col-lege we should consider our place in the sorority field . In 1899 Alpha Sigma Tau was one chapter. Twenty-five years later it was a m ember of the Association of Educa-tion Sororities. Now at our fiftieth anniver-sary we are an associate member of the Na-tional Panhellenic Conference. Each of these steps has meant a broader field and new challenges.

    As we start the second half of this century we can be grateful that the bu ine pro-cedure within our sorority are functioning smoothly so that we can thu concentrate on our relationships to college and to other sororities. We need to con ider way of having as many chapters as these ororities and thus our major aim for a long time now will be expansion.

  • THE ANCHOR

    Others will talk to yo.u abput methoqs of expansion and about our field. But while we are all here together let's consider that the responsibility for our expansion program rests not entirely with the national organizers but with chapters and with each individual in these chapters. The individual member is really the more important because chapters are merely groups of members. If we could seriously resolve at this convention that from riow on each individual will find out what she can do for Alpha Sigma Tau and then perform her duties, Alpha Sigma Tau's fu-tUre would be successful and assured. It is just as simple as that-and it can be done. Ori my last inspection trip I quoted the little jingle found in old spellers and copy books: . ~ittle drops of water-Little grains of sand

    Make the mighty ocean and the pleasant land.

    I repeat it because it applies to us. It is a stupendous thought that the ocean is made up of drops of water-but just so is the sorori ty made up of members and unless they all work together, we have no sorority.

    Along with telling chapters when you re-turn home about the convention favors, par-tie and fun , stress also these three things that we have mentioned-the development of social competence-the need for expan-sion- and the individual member's respon-sibilities.

    Members at this convention-Alpha Sigma Tau is your sorority-it is the only national one to which you may ever belong- Let's make it one of the best.

    The. Ninth National Convention SOCIAL EVENTS

    INFORMAL PARTY AN . informal party was held Tuesday

    night in the Wayne Room under the direc-tion of Theta chapter. A movie depicting the Aluminum Products Corporation was shown at the beginning of the party, in order to acquaint chapters with the possibility of using free movies for entertainment.

    The queen judging contest was conducted next. The queen being Miss June Banks ot" Zeta Tau. H er attendants were Joyce Popp of Theta and Jocelyn Loyster of Beta chap-ter. A photographer took pictures of indi-viduals and of various groups.

    Then the singing contest was held, various chapters singing whatever songs they wished . The prize was won by Detroit I alumnae.

    Refreshments were served, following which - a skit was presented by Theta chapter. The

    awarding of door prizes closed the party.

    BA