16) S. Baring-Gould The Lives of the Saints apndice

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Text of 16) S. Baring-Gould The Lives of the Saints apndice

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CORNELLUNIVERSITY LIBRARY

BRV.16

Cornell University Libraru

1710.B25 1898Lives of the saints.

3

1924 026 082 689

Thetine

original of

tliis

book

is in

Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright

restrictions intext.

the United States on the use of the

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924026082689

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THE

3Ltt3e0 of ti)eREV.

faints

S.

BARING-GOULD

SIXTEEN VOLUMESVOLUME THE SIXTEENTH

^

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This Volume containsto

Two

INDICES

Sixteen Volumes of the work, one an INDEX of the SAINTS whose Lives are given, and the other u. Subject Index.the

B-J(

&-

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THE

ilttieg of tt)eBY THE

^amtsiM.A.

REV.

S.

BARING-GOULD,Editionin

New

i6

Volumes

Revised with Introduction and Additional Lives ofEnglish Martyrs, Cornish and Welsh Saints,

and a

full

Index

to the Entire

Work

ILLUSTRATED BY OVER

400

ENGRAVINGS

VOLUME THE SIXTEENTH

LONDON

JOHN:

C.

NIMMOGREEN,&- CO.II

NEW YORK LONGMANS,MDCCCXCVIII

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Printed by

Ballantyne, Hanson &' Co.

At the Ballantyne Press

>i5i

Brittany,in fact, only

its

Princes and Saints.

95

two years, and then, as the legend says, rather than become bishop, probably thinking to obtain a wider

field for his energies, fled to Armorica, where he disembarked in the island of Ouessant, at a port which he named

after his

native place, Porz Ejenned (Port of the Oxen). His community consisted of twelve priests, twelve laymen of noble birth, nephews or cousins of the saint, all impatient to found tribes, and each taking with him wife

and

children,

and clansmen and

clients,

who threw

in

their fortunes with their leader.

Finally, they

brought with

them a quantity of slaves and priests were saints, and foundedmemorial chapels erected overhis

servants.lanns,

All the twelveto

and meritedS.still

have

their graves.

Paul erected

own

llan at a place in the island

called after him,

Lampaul, which is the principal village of the island. But the limits of Ouessant were too contracted for Paul's ardent spirit, and he crossed over to the mainland and founded another llan in a clearing of the forest, whereremains tothis

day

his

foundation of Lampaul-Ploudal-

same time one of his lay companions, named Pedr, founded a plou and established himself in amezan.thefortified caer thatstill

At

carries his

name, Ker-Ber, or the

castle of Peter.

But Paul could not remain quiet at this new station. on the move again, and now he went along the north coast in an easterly direction till he reached a Plou-Meinin, a rocky land colonised by some of the clansmen of Withur, whom he resolved on visiting,After two years he waspartly because he could not settle in his district withouthis consent,

and

also because

he was aisle

relative.

He

ac-

cordingly boated over to the

of Batz.

Paul was wel-

comed by

the count,

whom

he found engaged on making

Withur, who was now very much a copy of the Gospels. taken up with making his peace with God, made over the

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.,

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^

96island of Batz

Lives of the Saints.to

Paul,

Childebert to negotiate for him

ToS.

this

he agreed.

on condition that he went to some political settlement. Finally Paul settled where is now

Pol de Leon, where he ruled as a true saint-prince over ten trefs or, as the monastic scribes translate them, tribes,the whole constituting one ecclesiastical principality, con-

terminous in later times with the diocese of L^on.

On

the

death of Withur without children his principality was absorbed into Domnonia, with the exception of that portion

which Paul had claimed and received by right of kinship tothe tiern or chief

The

later writers of the lives of

some

of the saints could not understand early systems of partition of lands,

and they make Paul go

to Childebert

receive the episcopate whilst with him, forced

and on him by

the king. The course of affairs was probably this. Paul, knowing well that Withur was without heirs, went to him and demanded as his right as a kinsman a large slice of his principality. Withur consented, acknowledging the right, but bade him get Childebert's consent. Paul visited Paris, and there the Frank king expressed his willingness to ratify the negotiation on condition of Paul's being made

bishop over theall

district.

Paul did not see that

this

was

at

necessary.

An

abbot kept his bishops on hisit

staff to

ordain, but according to his ideasto

accumulate

offices in his

own handssteward.

was quite unnecessary ; he might as well

constitute himself his

own

However, Childebertecclesiastics

had been taught

differently

by the Latin-Frank

he associated the idea of jurisdiction with episcopacy, as essential he persisted, and Paul acquiesced reluctantly. Again, another arrival from Gwent is to be noted, and;

that

about the same time

;

this

was the immigration of

Carenkinal and Arthmael.the latter as ecclesiastical

The former came as secular, chief. They landed, where hadAberIldut,

others, in the estuary of the

and there Plou-

^-

-ij.

Brittany,Arzelbears the

its

Princesof the

andfirst

Saints.

97

still

name

colony planted byhis

Arthmael and

his cousin.

This remained in the hands ofvisit

Carenkinal, and Arthmael went east to

fellow-

countryman Paul, and see whether he could be useful to him, and perhaps also better himself. It is, however, possible that there may have been a quarrel between him and Carenkinal, and that the layman turned out the ecclesiastic. Such is the story as we have it, very fragmentary, of the colonisation of Lyonesse or Leon.

We

will

now

turn to that of Domnonia, that

is

to say,

the whole of the north coast from the river Keffleut or

Morlaix to the Couesnon at Pontorson, roughly speaking,of the present departments of C6tes-du-Nord and of the

northern portion of Ille-et-Vilaine.

The

early history

is

vague and legendary.

We know

so much, that before

460low

S.

Budoc was

settled

as abbot of a monastery in the isle of Lauret, near that of

Brehat, and connected with

it

at

tides.

He

would not

have been there unless he had powerful relatives establishedas secular chiefs near.

He

was doubtless a brother or son

of one of the

Domnonian

princes in Britain.

He

is

not to

be confounded with his namesake. Bishop of Dol, who diedin 588.

wife

Gwen and

In or about 460 one Fragan or Brychan, with his his sons, arrived in the bay of S. Brieuc

andstill

settled near the river Gouet,

and founded a plou

thathis

bears his name.

He

was a native of Gwent, andsettlements in Brittany.S.

wifetiern

was

grand-daughter of Aldroen or Alder, king or

of the

West Welsh

Their

son, Winwaloe, they to

committed to

Budoc, to be trained

become an ecclesiastical chieftain. Another arrival was Rhiwal, from Cardiganshire, at the head of a large body of clansmen, who landed where had Fragan, and who sought to establish themselves between the Gouet and the Urne in close proximity to Fragan, G VOL. XVI.4,

ii(

98wheretheis

Lives of the Saints.nowS. Brieuc.

About 485

arrived in the

same

harbour

S. Brioc,

with at least sixty persons with him in

same

vessel.

Brioc was probably from Ceredigion, the

present Cardiganshire; the date of his arrival was about 485.

Rhiwal received him favourably, and gave him land on which to settle, and when he died constituted him his successor,as they

were kinsmen

;

consequently the whole of the colonyecclesiastical

land and tribesmenprincipality..

was converted into anprinceor

We

next

hear of a

king over

Domnonia

bearing the same name, possibly the same man, Hoel ori.e. Rhi (the chief) Hywel, who lived between 511 and 520; but at precisely the same time we find a prince This Riwal is reported of the same name in Cornouaille. to have been son of Deroc, and to have had two brothers, Erbyn or Urbinian and Dinothus. Hoel of Cornouaille was the son of Budic I., who had been expelled from Armorica, and had taken refuge in Britai