1 Nutrition Basics Building Healthy Habits. 2 Stressed spelled backwards is Desserts! Habit: Pattern developed, often becoming involuntary Coincidence?

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  • 1 Nutrition Basics Building Healthy Habits
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  • 2 Stressed spelled backwards is Desserts! Habit: Pattern developed, often becoming involuntary Coincidence? I think not! ~Author Unknown
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  • 3 Definition: Added sugars Added sugars are sugars and syrups added to foods during processing or preparation. http://www.mypyramid.gov/downloads/MyPyramid_education_framework.pdf They do NOT include naturally occurring sugars found in milk and fruits. Extra sugar in your diet that is not burned off, leads to weight gain, over time!
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  • 4 Read the Nutrition Facts label for TOTAL sugars Which food has more TOTAL sugar? Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 container Amount Per Serving Calories: 110 Total Carbohydrate: 15 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 15 g A Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 container Amount Per Serving Calories: 240 Total Carbohydrate: 44 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 44 g B
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  • 5 Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 container Amount Per Serving Calories: 110 Total Carbohydrate: 15 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 15 g A has more TOTAL sugar Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 container Amount Per Serving Calories: 240 Total Carbohydrate: 44 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 44 g B B
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  • 6 4 grams sugar = 1 teaspoon How many teaspoons of sugar are in this 12 ounce can of pop? Answer: About 10 teaspoons! 38 g sugar 4 = 9.5 teaspoons sugar Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Amount Per Serving Calories: 152 Total Carbohydrate: 38 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 38 g
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  • 7 Look at the ingredient list for ADDED sugars Which food has more ADDED sugar? INGREDIENTS: cultured grade A reduced fat milk, apples, high-fructose corn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, natural flavors, pectin. B INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurized grade A nonfat milk, whey protein concentrate, pectin. A
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  • 8 TIP: the ingredient that weighs the most in a food is listed first with the ingredient that weighs the least, listed last. has more ADDED sugar B INGREDIENTS: cultured grade A reduced fat milk, apples, high-fructose corn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, natural flavors, pectin. B INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurized grade A nonfat milk, whey protein concentrate, pectin. A
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  • 9 These words indicate ADDED sugar Brown Sugar Corn Sweetener Corn Syrup Dextrose Fructose Fruit Juice Concentrates Glucose High-fructose Corn Syrup Honey Invert Sugar Lactose Maltose Malt Syrup Molasses Raw Sugar Sucrose Sugar Syrup http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_sugars.html
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  • 10 Foods containing most of the added sugars in American diets are: Regular soft drinks Candy Cakes Cookies Pies Fruit drinks, such as fruitades and fruit punch Milk-based desserts and products, such as ice cream, sweetened yogurt and sweetened milk Grain products, such as sweet rolls and cinnamon toast http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_sugars.html
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  • 11 Foods containing most of the added sugars in American diets are: Regular soft drinks Candy Cakes Cookies Pies Fruit drinks, such as fruitades and fruit punch Milk-based desserts and products, such as ice cream, sweetened yogurt and sweetened milk Grain products such as sweet rolls and cinnamon toast http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_sugars.html Its OK to eat these foods if you meet MyPyramid food group recommendations and dont exceed your calorie level.
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  • 12 Definition: Solid fats Solid fats are fats solid at room temperature, like butter and shortening. Solid fats come from many animal foods and can be made from vegetable oils through a process called hydrogenation. Some common solid fats are: Butter Beef fat (tallow, suet) Chicken fat Pork fat (lard) Stick margarine Shortening http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_fats.html
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  • Comparing Calories and Calories from Fat SKIM MILK 2% MILK 13
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  • Judging Calories and Calories from FAT in a Label 40 CaloriesLow 100 CaloriesModerate 400 CaloriesHIGH Check if the calories from FAT are the amount or more of the calories in your product. If they are this is considered a HIGH fat food, if close, moderate, if or less, low fat. 14
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  • 15 Foods high in solid fats include: Many cheeses Creams Ice creams Well-marbled cuts of meats Regular ground beef Bacon Sausages Poultry skin Many baked goods, such as cookies, crackers, donuts, pastries, and croissants http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_fats.html Its OK to eat these foods if you meet MyPyramid food group recommendations and dont exceed your calorie level.
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  • 16 The BAD news 100 extra calories per day 10 pound weight gain per year
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  • 17 Example of 100 calories 10 large jelly beans (1 ounce) 10 jelly beans
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  • Nutrients: A Balancing Act Carbohydrates Fats Protein Vitamins Minerals Water We are 60-70% water 18
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  • 19 Sample Nutrition Facts label http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/foodlab.html 1.Check Serving Size 2. Calories/serving 3-6. Check nutrients
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  • Other Parts of a Label YELLOW These nutrients should be limited BLUE Should consume more of these nutrients Purple % Daily Values are based on 2000 calorie a day diets. 5% or less = low 20% or more = HIGH 20
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  • The FOOTNOTE Based on a 2,000 calorie diet. This is not what is in the product! These are the amounts needed each day. Total Fat: 65 g.Sat. Fat: 20 g. Carbs: 300 g.Fiber: 25 g. Cholesterol: 300 mg. Sodium: 2,400 mg. (Max number) 21
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  • 22 Nutrition Facts Serving Size: Serving Size: 1 cup (228 g) Servings Per Container: Servings Per Container: 2 Amount Per Serving Calories:Calories from Fat: Calories: 250 Calories from Fat: 110 How many calories are in one Serving Size of this food? ANSWER: 250
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  • 23 Nutrition Facts Serving Size: Serving Size: 2 Tbsp. (30 g) Servings Per Container: Servings Per Container: 8 Amount Per Serving Calories:Calories from Fat: Calories: 90 Calories from Fat: 80 How many calories are in 4 tablespoons of this salad dressing? ANSWER: 180; 90 calories is for 2 Tbsp.
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  • 24 MyPyramid and MODERATION Each food group narrows toward the top. The base represents foods with little or no solid fats or added sugars. Select foods from the MyPyramid base more often. The narrowing top represents foods higher in sugar and fat. You can eat more of these if youre more active.
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  • 25 Would whole milk be near the TOP or the BOTTOM of MyPyramid? Whole milk would be nearer the top Fat-free milk would be at the bottom
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  • 27 MyPlate: Dairy products Consume 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk or equivalent milk products for ages 9 & up and 2 cups per day for ages 2 8 Equivalents: 8 oz. milk 1 cup yogurt 1 oz. natural cheese 2 oz. processed cheese
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  • 28 MyPlate: Grains Eat 6 ounces each day* 3 oz.-equivalents or more of whole-grain foods Remaining grains should come from enriched or whole-grain foods Ounce-equivalents: 1 slice bread 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal cup cooked pasta, rice or cereal *2,000 calorie diet level
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  • 29 MyPlate: Meat & beans Eat 5 ounces total each day.* Choose lean meat and poultry. Vary choices more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds. Ounce-equivalents: 1 oz. meat, poultry or fish cup cooked dry beans or peas 1 egg 1 tablespoon peanut butter oz. of nuts or seeds *2,000 calorie diet level
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  • 30 Portion sizes: Meat A typical 3 ounce portion of cooked meat, fish, or poultry = a deck of cards
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  • 31 When it comes to fruits & veggies For optimum health, scientists say eat a rainbow of colors. Your plate should look like a box of Crayolas. ~ Janice M. Horowitz, TIME, January 12, 2002
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  • 32 MyPlate: Fruits Eat the equivalent of 2 cups of fresh, canned or frozen fruits per day* Note: cup dried fruit = 1 cup fruit or fruit juice
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  • MyPlate: Vegetables 33 Eat the equivalent of 2 cups of raw or cooked vegetables per day* Note: 2 cups raw leafy greens = 1 cup of vegetables
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  • 34 MyPlate: Oils Because oils contain essential fatty acids, there is an allowance for oils in MyPlate. Recommended intake ranges from 3 to 7 teaspoons daily based on age, gender and level of physical activity. This is for cooking or use in dressings.
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  • 35 Definition: Nutrient-dense foods http://www.mypyramid.gov/downloads/MyPyramid_education_framework.pdf Nutrient-dense foods provide large amounts of vitamins and minerals and fewer calories.
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  • 36 Which food is more nutrient- dense? 2 slices whole wheat bread 1 medium croissant http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories.html
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  • 37 http://mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories.html The 2 slices of whole wheat bread are more nutrient-dense and have no discretionary calories. 2 slices whole wheat bread have 14