1 © 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Intelligent Ethernet and EtherNet/IP Deployments Cisco Systems, Inc.

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<ul><li>Slide 1</li></ul> <p>1 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Intelligent Ethernet and EtherNet/IP Deployments Cisco Systems, Inc. Slide 2 222 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Why Ethernet? From just 500Kbps10,100, Gig, 10 Gig From limited Many management managementoptions ProprietaryCommon standards From isolation WW connectivity Ethernet... the everlasting advantage of simplicity and total cost of ownership Challenge on the Factory Floor Solution Ethernet From single vendorMultiple vendors Slide 3 333 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Intro to Networking World: Understanding the OSI Model NO.NAMEENCAPS / PDUDEVICES PROTOCOLS NOTES 7 Application Raw Data Software PCs Crayons, Pictures, Writing, Sound Checks availability with comm. partner Ideas, Thoughts 6 Presentation.doc.xls.midi.ppt.jpg.bmp.gif.mp3.ascii.ebcdic Syntax, Compressio n, Formatting Standardized format 5 Session NFS SQL NetBios RPC Establish, manage and terminate sessions Negotiate a session set up 4 Transport Segment TCP UDPWindowing, Buffering Reliable or unreliable 3 Network Packet Routers, PCs IP IPXLogical Addressing, Best path Routed or routing protocols 2 Data Link Frame Bridges, Switches FR, TR, ATM, FDDI, Ethernet, SDLC, ISDN, SNA BIA address, Flow Control MAC address 1 Physical Bits Hubs, Repeaters Cables, Connectors, NIC Cards Like Morse Code Slide 4 444 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Media Transmission Chart NAMEACRONYMLENGTHDATA RATESTANDARD Twisted PairTP100 M10 MBPS802.3 Shielded Twisted PairSTP10 MBPS Coax - Thick500 M10 MBPS Coax - Thin185 M Fast EthernetTP (UTP) Fast E 100 M100 MBPS802.3 Fiber - Multimode2000 M Fiber - Singlemode15000 M Gigabit EthernetGig E Slide 5 555 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Sender Data Link Network Transport Session Presentation Application Physical Receiver Data Link Network Transport Session Presentation Application Physical How the OSI Model Works MEDIA Slide 6 666 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Ethernet Original Implementations PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E Ethernet was originally designed as a bus topology Slide 7 777 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Basic Ethernet Implementation PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E Whoever transmits owns the wire! Broadcast Domain Slide 8 888 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Basic Ethernet Implementation PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E So, What Happens When Two Data Streams Are Sent At The Same Time? Broadcast Domain and aCollision Domain Slide 9 999 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Ethernet Collisions PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E PCs B and D Transmit Simultaneously Broadcast Domain and aCollision Domain Slide 10 10 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Ethernet Collisions PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E If both transmit at the same time, there is a Collision Broadcast Domain and aCollision Domain Collision Slide 11 11 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Ethernet Collisions PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E When there is a collision, both sides back off (stop, wait a for a random time segment, and re- transmit) Back Off Broadcast Domain and aCollision Domain Slide 12 12 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Random Backoff and Re-Transmission PC APC BPC C PC FPC G PC D PC HPC J PC E Both sides re-transmit successfully Re-send 5 ms. Re-send 7 ms. Slide 13 13 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Watch out for COLLISION DOMAINS What makes up a collision domain? Half Duplex Transmission Ethernet Hubs (creates a shared bus) Avoid designs that create a COLLISION Domain -- Data transmission is not predictable NOT DETERMINISTIC Deploying Ethernet in a collision domain architecture is NOT acceptable for Manufacturing Control applications!!! Slide 14 14 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Deploying Deterministic Ethernet Networks FULL DUPLEX Ethernet vs. HALF DUPLEX Ethernet Switches vs. Hubs Intelligent Switching vs. basic Switching Slide 15 15 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Half versus Full Duplex transmission Half Duplex One station transmits, other listens. While transmitting, you do not receive, as no one else is transmitting. If someone else transmits while you are transmitting, then a collision occurs Any Receive-while-Transmit condition is considered a collision NON-DETERMINISTIC Full Duplex (standardized in 802.3x) Transmit and receive at the same time. Transmit on the transmit pair, and receive on the receive pairs. No collision detection, backoff, retry, etc Collision Free. No CS, no MA, no CD. Only relationship to HD is frame format &amp; encoding/signaling method DETERMINISTIC Slide 16 16 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Switches vs. Hubs Ethernet 10 One device sending at a time Hub All nodes share 10 Mbps Layer 1 Domain Ethernet Switch Each node has 10 Mbps Backbone Switched Ethernet 10 Multiple devices sending at the same time Layer 2 Domain Slide 17 17 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Shared Ethernet 10 Each node has 10 Mbps Switched Ethernet 100 Ethernet has progressed exponentially since it was first introduced Cost Performance Shared Media vs. Switches Collisions vs. Determinism Requirements for an scalable industrial networking solution go even farther Intelligent Ethernet switches enable personalized bandwidth per port Ethernet Switching Delivers Determinism Slide 18 18 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID A C B 2 4 1 10 Mbps Forwards packets based on a forwarding table Forwards based on the MAC (Layer 2) address Operates at OSI Layer 2 Learns a stations location by examining source address Sends out all ports when destination address is broadcast, multicast, or unknown address Forwards when destination is located on different interface Interface Stations 123 4 AX BX 3 LAN Switch Operation Slide 19 19 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Motors, Drives, Actuators Robotics Sensors and other Input/Output Devices Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) Human Machine Interface (HMI) PC Based Controllers Back-Office Mainframes and Servers (ERP, MES, CAPP, PDM, etc.) Device Level Network Ethernet Office Applications, Internetworking, Data Servers, Storage Corporate IT Network Central NMS Pager Handheld Scanner Wireless Video Apps Video Feed Industrial Ethernet is Extended to the Control Layer Slide 20 20 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Challenges of Implementing Ethernet Ethernet Evolution Intelligent Services in the Network Agenda Availability, QoS, and Security Summary Slide 21 21 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Benefits Enhanced Productivity and Efficiency Reduced Costs Remote Diagnostics Streamlined Network Infrastructure Scalability Challenges Determinism: Is the Control Data always on time? Uptime: Is my network as resilient? Access Control: Are authorized entities the only ones accessing the control traffic and data? The Benefits and Challenges of Ethernet Slide 22 22 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Industrial Ethernet deployments must focus on three key areas for scalable deployments Availability: Insure that network resources are resilient and scalable Quality of Service: Provides assurance of low latency and delay of the Control Data Security: Protect the factory floor data and network resources from threats and/or unauthorized access By implementing these functions, Industrial Networks will institute a solid foundation for supporting incremental applications and solutions Challenges to Implementing Ethernet Can be Addressed Slide 23 23 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Challenges of Implementing Ethernet Ethernet Evolution Intelligent Services in the Network Agenda Availability QoS Security Summary Slide 24 24 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Ring Topology Distribution Core Access Dual Homed Tree Network Design Traditional Redundant Network Designs Slide 25 25 2003 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Presentation_ID Logical Industrial Ethernet Template Access/Client Layer- IGMP Snooping will be employed to control multicast Producer/Consumer communication model Distribution/Access Layer- 802.1D, 802.1W and 802.1S will be employed to ensure layer 2 convergence</p>

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