© 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ z/VM Module 11: Networking

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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ z/VM Module 11: Networking
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Objectives Describe TCP/IP setup in conjunction with z/VM Understand the fundamental concepts of computer networks List and describe the four different protocols of the TCP/IP architecture and their purpose Describe the purpose and function of routing
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Objectives continued List the reasons for using a routing table and the major differences between these dynamic routing table formats: RIP-1 RIP-2 OSPF List and describe the four different types of internet addressing: Network address format Broadcast address format Multicast address format Subnetwork address format
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Objectives continued Explain the major differences between the fiber connectors ESCON and FICON Show and describe how a Parallel Sysplex is set up and the enhancements it can provide Describe the devices and protocols that are available when configuring your network, including: QDIO (can be configured into guest LANs with z/VM 4.3) OSA-Express and OSA-2 HiperSockets (can be configured into guest LANs)
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Objectives continued Describe how VIPA is capable of adding another level of protection against network failures, along with recovery Discuss the four major commands needed to monitor your TCP/IP network: NETSTAT RPCINFO PING TRACERTE
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ z/VM and TCP/IP
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Computer Network Is a group of connected nodes that are used for data communication Its configuration consists of data processing devices, software, and transmission media that are linked for information interchange Nodes are the functional units, located at the points of connection among the data circuits Some of the more common network architectures, or protocols, used today are OSI, TCP/IP, SNA, and ISDN.
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Internet Addressing
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ OSI Model
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Internet Environment The internet is a logical collection of networks supported by: Gateways Routers Bridges Hosts Various layers of protocols Protocols specify a set of rules and formats required to exchange and transfer packets of information.
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Internet Environment continued Internet a worldwide network of computer networks Intranet a private network, usually used within a closed environment supporting one company Extranet a private network that uses the Internet protocols and the public telecommunication system to share part of a companys business information with outside vendors
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ TCP/IP Architecture
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ TCP/IP Architecture continued
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Routing: Overview It is the method by which a host or a gateway decides where to send a datagram. There are two kinds of routing that are involved in communication within an internet: Direct routing is used when the source and destination nodes are in the same logical network within an internet. Indirect routing is used when the source and destination nodes are on different networks within an internet, where source nodes send packets to a gateway or router on the same network using direct routing and the packets are forwarded through intermediate gateways until the destination is reached
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Routing: Overview - Terms Important terms are: Router Gateway Daemon Network Interface Network Subnetwork FTP TELNET
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Routing Tables
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Routing Table Management The most complex task in configuring the TCP/IP network routing is establishing the routing tables. Static routing requires you to manually configure the routing tables yourself. With dynamic routing, information is automatically exchanged among various routers in your network, which allows IP address to be found when a new IP host come online. The more common interior gateway protocols in dynamic routing are: RIP-1 RIP-2
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Dynamic Routing: RIP Version 1
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Dynamic Routing: RIP Version 2
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ OSPF Open Shortest Path First OSPF differs from RIP in these ways: No limitations on the hop count Intelligent use of VLSM Uses IP multicast to send link-state updates Better convergence Better load balancing Allows for routing authentication
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ BGP Border Gateway Protocol is an interautonomous system routing protocol. The attributes that BGP uses in the route selection process include: Weight Local preference Multi-exit discriminator Origin AS_Path Next hop Community
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Virtual IP Addressing (VIPA)
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Internet Addressing and Network Address Format
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Internet Addressing: Broadcast, Multicast, and Subnetwork TCP/IP uses IP broadcasting to send datagrams to all the TCP/IP host on a network or subnetwork Multicasting also sends datagrams, but you will only receive the datagrams if the host is signed up to listen for the particular IP multicast address; otherwise it is discarded The subnetwork capability of TCP/IP divides a single network into multiple logical networks
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Networking Device Options
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ ESCON (Enterprise System Connectivity) The high-speed fiber optic architecture first available on ES/9000 and many other peripherals Originally used LEDs and worked at 10MBps over 3 km stretches A laser version announced in 1991 is capable of working at greater distances Was replaced by FICON in 1998, though still available
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ FICON (Fibre Connections)
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ FICON CTC
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Parallel Sysplex Cluster Technology The zSeries Parallel Sysplex cluster contains innovative multi-system data sharing technology. This allows direct, concurrent read/write access to shared data from all processing modes in the configuration without sacrificing performance or data integrity. The Parallel Sysplex manages this multi-system environment, providing these benefits: Continuous availability Dynamic workload balancing Application compatibility
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Parallel Sysplex Cluster Technology continued Within a Parallel Sysplex cluster it is possible to construct a parallel processing environment with no single point of failure. The features of the Parallel Sysplex solution that contribute to increased availability and also help eliminate some system management tasks are: Workload manager Sysplex failure manager Automatic restart manager Cloning
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Queued Direct I/O (QDIO)
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Open System Adapters
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ OSA-2 An integrated hardware feature that allows a zSeries 900 to provide industry-standard connectivity directly to clients on local area networks. The clients on the attached LAN can use the TCP/IP or the SNA/APPN protocol, or both. Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, and ATM LAN attachment to the z900 is supported by OSA-Express, but not by OSA-2.
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ OSA-Express Characteristics
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ Virtual IP Addressing
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ What Are HiperSockets and What Benefits Do They Provide? They provide very fast TCP/IP communications between servers running in different LPARs on a zSeries CEC. HiperSockets uses internal Queued Input/Output (iQDIO) at memory speeds to pass traffic between the virtual servers. Important aspects of HiperSockets include: They can be used to communicate among consolidated servers in a single processor They can be customized to accommodate varying traffic sizes Since there is no server-to-service traffic outside the zSeries CEC, they provide a much higher level of network availability, security, simplicity, performance, and cost effectiveness
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ How Do HiperSockets Work?
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ HiperSockets Usage Example
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  • 2004 IBM Corporation IBM ^ HiperSockets Microcode Functions HiperSockets implementation is based on the OSA-Express QDIO protocol, hence HiperSockets is also called internal iQDIO. TCP/IP stacks are a