OSHA Compliance with Flammable and Combustible Liquids

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The presentation discusses the OSHA requirements using, storing, and handling flammable and combustible liquids. It provides information on design and construction of inside storage rooms and the risks associated with operations and processes using flammable and combustible liquids. If you wish for us to develop/provide occupational health and safety training for your organizaiton, feel free to contact us by email at windsgroup@aol.com.

Text of OSHA Compliance with Flammable and Combustible Liquids

  • Flammable Liquids Standard: How to Prevent Explosions & Fire Hazards and Stay in Compliance Presented by: Bernard L. Fontaine, Jr., CIH, CSP The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc. Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Introduction The two primary hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids are explosion and fire Safe handling and storage of flammable liquids requires the use of NFPA approved equipment and practices per OSHA standards Webinar does not cover risks on combustible dust or flammable gas or solids Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Session Objectives You will be able to: Identify a flammable and combustible liquids Know the hazards of flammable and combustible liquids and the types of controls to prevent their ignition Procedures to safely store, dispense, and handle these liquids Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Whats the Big Deal? Flammable and combustible liquids are easily ignited Ignite with explosive force Burn readily and give off twice the heat as paper or wood fire Common materials taken for granted or used carelessly Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Fire Tetrahedron Fuel Combustible Flammable Liquid Heat Source Increased Surface Temperature Production of Vapor Oxygen Sustained Combustion Suitable Chemical Reaction Flame Established Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Flammable Liquids Flammableflashpoint below 100F (37.8C) Isopropyl alcohol Propane Solvents such as acetone, MEK, paint thinner, varnish Fuels such as gasoline Aerosol cans Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Combustible Liquids Flashpoint at or above 100 F Oil, kerosene Greases and lubricants Oil-based paints Although combustible liquids have higher flash points than flammable liquids, they can pose serious fire and/or explosion hazards when heated. Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classifying Flammable Liquids Flashpoint Category N/A (1910.106 Not Applicable) unless 199.4 F 140 F Flammable 73.4 F heated for use to within 30 F of its FP, then treat as Category 4 Category 4 Category 3 Category 1 Category 2 < 95 F > Boiling Point Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classifying Flammable Liquids Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classifying Combustible Liquids Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classes of Flammable and Combustible Liquids Flash Point (oF) 200 IIIA 140 Combustible (FP > 100oF) II 100 Flammable (FP < 100oF) 73 IA IB 100 Boiling Point (oF) Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classes of Flammable Liquids Common Name Flash Point (oF) CLASS IA Ethyl Ether -49 CLASS IB Gasoline Methyl Ethyl Ketone Toluene Benzene -45 21 40 12 CLASS IC Xylene Turpentine Hydrazine Styrene 81-115 95 99 88 Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Classes of Combustible Liquids Common Name CLASS II Acetic Acid Naphtha Stoddard Solvent Flash Point (oF) 103 100-109 102-110 CLASS IIIA Cyclohexanol Formic Acid Nitrobenzene 154 122 190 CLASS IIIC Formalin Picric Acid 185 302 Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Whats the Hazard? Flammable and combustible liquids vaporize and form flammable mixtures with air when: Exposed to air (containers are left open) Leaks or spills occur Heated or aerosolized Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Degree of Hazard Risk Determined by: The flashpoint , boiling point, and the vapor pressure of the solvent The vapors concentration in the air The presence of potential ignition sources Remembervapors burn or explode, not the liquid Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Flashpoint The lowest temperature at which a liquid gives off enough vapors at its surface to form an ignitable mixture in air Low flashpoint = high flammability Flammable liquids flashpoint is 25% LEL atmosphere Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Sources of Ignition Some potential sources of ignition are: Open flame Smoking Welding and cutting Hot surfaces Internal combustion engines Electrical/mechanical spark Lightning Static electricity Flammable vapors can travel some distance to a source of ignition and flash back Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Static Electricity Generated when a fluid flows through pipe or from an opening into a tank Main hazards are fire and explosion from sparks containing enough vapor to ignite flammable vapors Bonding and grounding of storage containers is necessary to dissipate any stored static charge Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Prevent Fire and Explosion Eliminate ignition sources prevent flames, sparks, and arcs Eliminate static electricity ground or bond containers Minimize vapor concentrations Image credit: Tom Ouimet Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Bonding Containers Physically connect two conductive objects together with a bond wire and clip to remove a difference of static charge between them Bonding wires are placed between two containers during liquid filling or dispensing operations unless a metallic path is place in between them Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Grounding Containers Eliminates a difference in static charge potential between conductive objects and ground. Bonding eliminates a difference in potential between objects. Does not eliminate a difference in potential between these objects and earth. Unless one of the objects is connected to earth with a ground wire. Copyright 2014 The Windsor Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Industrial Plants Category 1, 2, or 3 (FP